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first_imgCoronavirus | Federal Government | Southeast | TourismThere have been two attempts in Congress to save Alaska’s cruise season in the last week. They’ve both failed.April 29, 2021 by Eric Stone, KRBD – Ketchikan Share:Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski urges Senate colleagues to support a bill that would waive a federal law and allow Alaska-bound cruises to bypass Canada Thursday. (Still from U.S. Senate video)The U.S. Senate on Thursday blocked consideration of a waiver that would have allowed foreign-flagged cruise ships to visit Alaska ports this summer. The Passenger Vessel Services Act, a 19th-century law that aims to protect the domestic shipping industry, requires Alaska-bound foreign-flagged cruise ships to stop in Canada. With Canada’s ports closed to cruise ships though next February due to COVID-19 concerns, the law effectively prevents Alaska’s cruise season from going forward.Alaska Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski asked the Senate to fast-track a short-term waiver of the law for voyages between Washington and Alaska. She said hope for a 2021 season was fading in Alaska.“Back home right now, people are not talking about the season for 2021 coming up. The motto is: ‘Get through to ‘22,’” Murkowski said on the Senate floor. “That’s an awful way to be approaching our situation, and so they have asked for help. They realize that anything that we can do to try to salvage even a few weeks of a tourist season is going to be important to us.”She offered an amendment to the waiver bill, dubbed the Alaska Tourism Recovery Act, that would require cruise lines to carry defibrillators, provide passengers with a bill of rights and ask regulators to draw up new rules for cruise lines to return human remains when a passenger dies at sea. She said the amendment had been negotiated with two Democratic colleagues: Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal and Washington Sen. Maria Cantwell. Blumenthal described the amendment as a “negotiated compromise” with Alaska’s Senate delegation.“These are simple, common-sense changes that ensure cruising is safe for passengers and for crew,” Murkowski said. She said the industry already adhered to two of the three provisions, though she did not specify which.Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah objected, stalling the bill. He said he was amenable to waiving the Passenger Vessel Services Act — he said he’d like to see it repealed entirely — but the amendment was unacceptable.“Unfortunately the bill that’s now before us has deviated from that purpose. It now has poison pill provisions that add duplicative, unnecessary and unrelated regulations that will harm, not help the cruise industry,” Lee said.Because Murkowski’s fast-track maneuver required consent from all present senators, Lee’s objection was enough to derail the waiver for the time being. But Alaska Republican Sen. Dan Sullivan, who co-sponsored the waiver, said he’s optimistic.“Here on the Senate floor, despite what you’ve seen, there’s actually been momentum and movement, and I’m confident we can get there,” Sullivan said.Federal maritime law is only one barrier to a summer 2021 Alaska cruise season. Orders from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have prevented large cruise ships from sailing since last March. The CDC’s No-Sail Order was instituted after COVID-19 outbreaks aboard cruise ships spread rapidly in the early months of the pandemic. A 2020 Miami Herald analysis linked cruise ship outbreaks to more than 100 deaths among nearly 4,000 cases.Last year, after pressure from the White House, the CDC replaced that blanket ban with what it calls the Conditional Sail Order, billed as a way to resume cruises safely. It requires that cruise companies submit detailed COVID-19 mitigation plans and conduct training and drills before sailing. But the CDC has yet to tell cruise lines what those should look like. So, progress towards the resumption of U.S.-based cruises has been slow. Last week, Sullivan and Florida Republican Sen. Rick Scott asked to fast-track the CRUISE Act, which would require the CDC to lift its order by July 4. Washington Democratic Sen. Patty Murray objected, blocking its passage. Murray said she was concerned that lifting the CDC rules would risk lives.But there’s a ray of hope from the CDC. A letter sent to cruise industry figures said the agency “remain[s] committed to the resumption of passenger operations in the United States following the requirements in the CSO [the Conditional Sail Order] by mid-summer, which aligns with the goals announced by many major cruise lines.” The letter clarified guidance issued by the CDC in April regarding crew testing, vaccination and pandemic preparedness measures at ports that receive ships.A CDC spokesperson told USA Today that if cruise lines submit their port plans promptly, passenger voyages could resume in mid-July. When the CDC issued updated rules for cruise ship sailings in early April, the mayor of the small Southeast cruise port of Skagway said he was concerned that some CDC rules on medical capacity at ports would leave small towns without a chance to receive ships.Alaska’s cruise season generally runs from about May through September.Share this story:last_img read more

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first_imgFriday 31 July 2015 5:07 pm whatsapp Tags: Green energy whatsapp Germany just set a new record in renewable energy, with solar, wind, biomass and hydro accounting for 78pc of the country’s energy consumption Germany set a new record in renewable energy, with over three-quarters of the country’s consumption coming from green energy.A few sunny hours last Saturday were enough for a new high in renewables, as green energy accounted for 78 per cent of Germany’s energy consumption. Solar and wind alone accounted for 40.65 gigawatts of the country’s power last weekend, thanks to a sunny day and strong winds in the north of the country, where most of the wind farms are based, according to Craig Morris, writing about Germany’s transition to renewable energy:The combination of sunny weather in the south with strong wind throughout the country is rare – and led to a new record.Factoring in biomass and hydropower put the total renewable energy consumption at 47.9 gigawatts, or 78 per cent of all power consumed.The previous record was 74 per cent.Despite this new high, Germany remains some distance away from being fully powered by green energy, as coal continues to make up 40 per cent of the country’s power consumption. The growth in renewables is instead largely replacing nuclear energy.   center_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunGameday NewsNBA Wife Turns Heads Wherever She GoesGameday Newszenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorTheFashionBallAlica Schmidt Is The Most Beautiful Athlete To ExistTheFashionBallLoan Insurance WealthGrab A Tissue Before You See Richard Simmons At 72Loan Insurance Wealth Share Show Comments ▼ More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgWhite House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comSidney Crosby, Alex Ovechkin are graying and frayingnypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.com Clara Guibourg last_img read more

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first_img Hauliers remained in limbo today as governments on both sides of the Channel seek a resolution to the border closure imposed by France after the UK identified a new variant of Covid-19.UK prime minister Boris Johnson is to provide an update later today, with expectations that French authorities will reopen the border to accompanied freight by tomorrow for drivers who test negative for the virus.Nonetheless, the queue of trucks waiting to leave the UK continues to build, alongside concerns over driver welfare and the spoilage of fresh produce.Chief executive of Scotland Food & Drink James Withers slammed the “upbeat assessment” of the UK government, noting not only that the situation is continuing to deteriorate, but that the number of stranded trucks exceeds reported figures.“Contrary to an upbeat assessment from the prime minister yesterday, the situation has been deteriorating,” Mr Withers said.“We understand the number of lorries parked up in the wrong place in the UK is now in the thousands. There has been a very small amount of seafood that was caught in the backlog that has managed to switch to unaccompanied freight and get to France. But the vast bulk of the problem remains and is worsening.“Government should be holding a COBRA meeting again today and focusing all efforts on agreeing a protocol with France.”Other reports suggested the prime minister had failed to reference the impact on goods sent via Eurotunnel, which makes up 26% of the trade between the EU and UK.Chief executive of the Road Haulage Association (RHA) Richard Burnett accused the government of issuing “misleading” figures.Mr Burnett tweeted: “Why mislead the public regarding vehicles parked on the M20? At 11.30am yesterday there were 700 in the queue. By 6.30pm last night there were 945 and a further 600 in Ashford truck stop. Where did you get 170 from?”Yesterday, both the RHA and Logistics UK urged government to keep driver welfare front and centre of their efforts to address the situation. RHA MD of public and policy affairs Rod McKenzie said “major question marks” surrounded the facilities available to truckers, who “deserve to be treated better”.Mr Burnett added: “Truckers typically have low Coviod-19 infection rates, given the nature of their jobs and minimal contact they have with others, so it doesn’t make sense that they can’t cross the border into France.”Director of food & sustainability at the British Retail Consortium Andrew Opie said the situation raised fresh concerns over driver availability in the UK.“While goods can enter from France, few haulage firms will be willing to send trucks and drivers to the UK without a guarantee they can return to the EU in a timely manner. This is a key supply route for fresh produce at this time of year,” said Mr Opie.“Channel crossings see 10,000 trucks passing daily during peak periods, such as in the run up to Christmas. We urge the UK government and the EU to find a pragmatic solution to this as soon as possible, to prevent disruption for consumers. Retailers have stocked up on goods ahead of Christmas which should prevent immediate problems.“However, any prolonged closure of the French border would be a problem as the UK enters the final weeks before the transition ends on 31st December.”For suppliers, concerns are now building over the financial impact of the ban, with Mr Withers stating that discussions with the insurance industry presented a bleak picture.“The focus is, rightly, on seafood, as it is the most time-sensitive and threatened sector, but there are other Scottish food exporters and importers whose worries are significant and growing,” he said. “Based on discussions with the insurance industry, we aren’t aware of any companies that will be able to claim for losses, despite suggestions otherwise from UK ministers yesterday.“Also, the options for alternative markets are minimal. The major supermarkets in the UK are well supplied for Christmas and the hospitality sector is facing another Covid lockdown.” By Alex Whiteman, Brexit reporter 22/12/2020 Photo 56162041 © Sue Martin – Dreamstime.comlast_img read more

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first_img DURHAM, N.C. — If you leave the American Tobacco Trail and drive east, past Dame’s Almost Famous Chicken & Waffles, Bullock’s Bar-B-Que, and the Truly Blessed Hair Salon, you will eventually come to the world’s largest research park.This 16-square-mile stretch of Piedmont pine forest is home to about 200 companies that develop drugs and devices, run clinical trials, and otherwise push the boundaries of bioscience. GlaxoSmithKline, Merck & Co., and Biogen all have offices here, as do other industry leaders and startups.This is Burr country.advertisement Burr is Senator Richard Burr, and this is the heart of the state’s pharmaceutical and biotech industry, which the veteran lawmaker has spent his career protecting. Now, with Burr facing a strong challenge from a former Democratic state representative, the industry is returning the favor, with pharmaceutical executives and lobbyists pouring money into his campaign.“The industry feels very positive about Senator Burr, because he’s always taken a strong leadership role in policy that we’re interested in,” said Samuel Taylor, president of the state’s bioscience trade group, set in a sprawling brick structure in the rolling hills of The Research Triangle Park, as the area is known. “He’s done a stellar job.”advertisement The Research Triangle Park is the heart of North Carolina’s pharmaceutical and biotech industry. Alex Hogan/STAT, Google EarthIt’s a job that those here in The Research Triangle, and those in the nearby Wake Forest Innovation Quarter, badly want him to keep.Burr, now in his second term following a decade in the House, has been uniquely positioned to press for faster regulatory approval of drugs and medical devices and lower taxes for the industry, and to generally be a booster for his state, which touts itself as the nation’s third-largest biotech cluster, behind Boston and Northern California.His committee posts have given him oversight of both the Food and Drug Administration and Medicare and Medicaid. He is also the chairman of the Select Committee on Intelligence.“I’ve always found him to be somebody who is very thoughtful, smart, and works to learn the issues,” said Stephen Northrup, a partner at Rampy Northrup, a lobbying firm, who got to know Burr as GOP health policy director for the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.Polls, however, show Burr in a tight race with Deborah K. Ross, who served 10 years in the State House and who previously served as director of North Carolina’s American Civil Liberties Union.That has not sat well with the drug industry.“I told my pharmaceutical clients to get down there and help,” said one lobbyist who spoke on condition of anonymity to speak candidly.Drug makers, medical device companies, related health care political action committees, and the companies’ lobbyists and employees, have so far given Burr more than $1.2 million this election cycle, making the industry by far his most generous supporter, according to a STAT analysis.Nearly every firm has chipped in. GlaxoSmithKline, the largest company in The Research Triangle Park, gave $10,000. Abbott Laboratories donated $7,500 to the senator, and its spinoff, AbbVie, gave $9,000. The Bayer Corporation donated $7,000; Davita gave $8,000; Emergent Biosolutions gave $10,000; and Eli Lilly & Co. kicked in $8,000.With the election getting closer, the pharmaceutical and medical-device industry has hosted a series of fundraisers in Washington for Burr. Lobbyists for Abbvie and Johnson & Johnson, for example, invited prospective donors to dine with the senator at an Italian trattoria. King & Spalding, a law firm with a large pharmaceutical practice, threw a fundraiser reception for him on the rooftop of its Pennsylvania Avenue quarters.The Advanced Medical Technology Association, which represents the majority of the nation’s medical technology companies, hosted two events for Burr, who has pushed for the repeal of the medical device excise tax.Some companies have contributed $10,000 to Burr’s campaign, then donated an addition $10,000 to his leadership PAC.That kind of support, industry insiders say, reflects the commitment that Burr has made to them over the years. Leave this field empty if you’re human: PoliticsIn a tight race, one of pharma’s favorite senators gets a little help from his friends By Sheila Kaplan Oct. 25, 2016 Reprints Please enter a valid email address. Medical device makers rally to save their ‘go-to guy’ in Congress center_img Supporters point to Burr’s sponsorship of the FDA Modernization Act of 1997, which cut the agency’s review time for new drug approvals and called for increased patient access to experimental drugs and medical devices. That measure was approved while Burr was in the House.In the Senate, he was a driving force in creation of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), a federal office that serves as a kind of government venture capital arm for fighting bioterrorism. BARDA develops and buys vaccines, drug therapies, and diagnostic tools for public health threats, such as anthrax, and possible pandemics.Northrup, who worked on the legislation, said Burr deserves more credit for it than he’s usually given.“There would not be a BARDA today if it was not for the work that Senator Burr did,” Northrup said. “That was his first major accomplishment in the Senate, in his first two years.”Jesse Hunt, a spokesman for Burr, said the senator continues to push for funding for BARDA and the National Institutes of Health. Asked about the drug industry’s support, he noted that Ross’s campaign coffers have been filled by liberal Democratic groups and labor unions, which he said were out of step with North Carolina values.Ross’s campaign declined to comment on Burr’s industry support, but throughout the campaign has stressed his support from health insurers.Senator Richard Burr and Democratic challenger Deborah K. Ross participate in a debate in Research Triangle Park, N.C., earlier this month. Gerry Broome/AP“North Carolina voters know better than to trust the insurance industry’s hand-picked candidate to look after their Medicare,” said Cole Leiter, Ross’s press secretary.Burr’s supporters have expressed concern that their candidate could be dragged down by Donald Trump. Burr has stood by Trump, calling for forgiveness after the surfacing of comments in which the Republican candidate suggested sexually assaulting women.Still, here in the biotech center, voters may be more concerned with maintaining North Carolina’s newly strong economy — and with having a friend in the Senate — than with presidential politics.The North Carolina Biosciences Organization is among the groups here supporting Burr, although unofficially. When a reporter came by for a visit, the head of the group, Samuel Taylor, said he had just called the Burr camp, seeking directions on what he might say in the interview.The campaign didn’t call back in time, but Taylor knew how he wanted to put it: “It’s important to have a member of Congress who understands the FDA, and has the respect of the FDA,” he said, “and I think that Senator Burr meets both of those criteria.” Privacy Policy Newsletters Sign up for D.C. Diagnosis An insider’s guide to the politics and policies of health care. Tags biotechFDApharmaceutical industrypolicy Related: Senator Richard Burr is in a tight race with Deborah K. Ross, a former North Carolina state representative. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Imageslast_img read more

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first_img This disconnect in communication between physicians and patients causes tens of millions of Americans to unnecessarily suffer each year and costs the US health care system as much as $300 billion a year. The missed diagnoses, emergency visits, and silent dissonance over treatment decisions that stem from this disconnect place a significant emotional and physical strain on patients and their physicians.How do we help patients open up and give doctors more tools and time to listen? The first-year medical school curriculum might have an answer.In my Patient Doctor I class, the first skill we were taught as doctors in training was to establish rapport — a mutual feeling of harmony, confidence, and trust — early in conversation with a patient. It could mean anything from mentioning the score of last night’s New England Patriots game to celebrating a mutual love of baklava.Sally and I were both dog people.Rapport fosters honesty and opens up patients to deeper conversations. Asking patients about what they hope to achieve from their care, their long-term health goals, and what’s most important to them helps align goals traditionally favored by health care professionals (healthy vital signs and lab test results, better control of illness, and good quality of life) with the goals that are on the minds of patients like Sally (will I have enough energy and be steady enough on my feet when I go home to take care of my puppy?)Physicians who manage to spend extra time listening to patients with chronic conditions heavily influenced by human behavior, such as type 2 diabetes and smoking, find that promoting preventive habits that are in line with their patients’ own goals increases the likelihood that their patients will follow their treatment plans and improve their long-term health.Another way clinicians can establish rapport is by sharing stories with their patients of others who have been in their shoes. This might be something along the lines of, “Many of my patients like you have been happy with this medication and course of treatment.” This gives patients space to confirm similarities and voice differences that can help guide their care. Sharing accounts of patients with similar illnesses can create a sense of community in what, for many people, can be an isolating experience. It also makes it evident that the doctor has taken the time to understand what makes his or her patients happy.The bottleneck that often impedes such interactions is time. To give physicians more time to listen to their patients, health care organizations need to rethink the value of each hour of a physician’s workday. Giving doctors more time with patients and easing the burden of other tasks, such as recruiting medical scribes to document visits, automating discharge paperwork, off-loading lab orders, and streamlining care transitions, will move the needle toward better long-term patient care and away from the treadmill of efficiency. APStock Sally told me that she suffers from Crohn’s disease, a condition in which the body’s immune system continuously and relentlessly attacks the gastrointestinal tract from the inside out. She had landed in the emergency department because the disease had spontaneously flared up a few hours after dinner, sparking a high fever and intense abdominal pain. The emergency physicians stabilized her, but I could see that she was still distressed.I asked her if she had any ideas why her Crohn’s might have flared up. Sally replied that she had stopped taking her new Crohn’s medications a couple weeks earlier, then added, “You are the first doctor to have asked me that question.” That caught me off guard. How could it be that I, a student with only four months of medical experience under my belt, was the first person to ask what seemed like a basic question?I followed up with the next logical question, “Why did you stop taking your medication?” Sheepishly, she told me that it had been making her nauseous and dizzy, but she had been afraid to mention the side effects to her doctor.Sally isn’t alone in not disclosing important information like that. Many patients hesitate to speak up to their doctors out of the fear that they might be viewed in a negative light and consequently receive worse care.For those who do speak up, doctors often don’t have the time to listen. Seeing dozens of patients a day, and doing the companion paperwork, can make it difficult to spend a few extra minutes listening to patients. A report in the Annals of Internal Medicine put this in context: For every hour that physicians spend seeing patients, they spend two writing notes in electronic health records. Even when clinicians do get time with patients, many — and I’m guilty of this myself — often simply cycle through a checklist of questions, fearing that any deviation will lead the patient on a 20-minute tangent down memory lane. About the Author Reprints Leave this field empty if you’re human: As more health systems transition their focus of care from volume to value, it will be well worth it for them to give physicians extra time with patients to learn their goals, align outcomes, and prevent care complications down the road.I believe that it will ultimately fall to a new generation of clinicians to reconcile the modern patient-provider relationship. Although this bond is fluid and constantly evolving, it should encourage physicians to do what idyllic first-year students are wont to do: lend an ear, give their time, and gather important information about their patients’ health and satisfaction.Luckily for Sally, there are a variety of drug classes to help manage Crohn’s disease that may help her avoid nausea, unnecessary pain, and an emergency room visit. But if she doesn’t feel comfortable and at ease speaking up about her goals and her concerns, and her care team doesn’t make it abundantly apparent that it will be there to listen, we’re more likely to see — but not hear — her again next week.Nisarg A. Patel is a third-year student at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Improving health care with the simple act of listening [email protected] First OpinionThe doctor will hear you now Nisarg A. Patel The day I zipped my lips and let my patients talk Related:center_img Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts. By Nisarg A. Patel March 23, 2017 Reprints Privacy Policy Please enter a valid email address. Related: @nxpatel There’s absolutely no good reason why Sally should have been in the hospital. Not a day over 60, she had come to the emergency department for severe gastrointestinal pain and was then moved to a bed on the 10th floor of one of the hospital’s two towers.I met Sally (not her real name) during my first year in medical school. Every Monday, my job was to take the medical history of one patient. Our class was short on patients that afternoon and my professor, an attending physician at the hospital, had left me to help another student find a patient to interview.That meant I was alone as I walked into Sally’s room. I greeted her and sat down in the chair next to her bed. Monitors on either side of her bed beeped steadily as they kept track of heart rate, blood pressure, and the amount of oxygen in her bloodstream.advertisement I gave her the one thing that first-year students can offer that few others in the hospital can: my undivided time and attention.“What brought you to the hospital?” I asked.advertisement Tags educationpatientsphysicianslast_img read more

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first_img GET STARTED Merck is probed by Spain’s antitrust regulator for allegedly delaying competition for a contraceptive About the Author Reprints @Pharmalot Ed Silverman Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Pharmalot What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTEDcenter_img Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. By Ed Silverman Nov. 25, 2019 Reprints Log In | Learn More Tags legalSTAT+women’s health Alex Hogan/STAT [email protected] The antitrust regulator in Spain has accused Merck (MRK) of working with other companies to hinder the entry of generic versions of a hormonal contraceptive, the latest effort by a European government to crack down on anti-competitive practices in the pharmaceutical industry.In a statement issued last Thursday, the National Commission on Markets and Competition announced that it is pursuing sanctions against Merck Sharp & Dohme, its European affiliate, and MSD Human Health Holding, the European parent, for possibly delaying competitors from entering the market for a vaginal ring in Spain. What’s included?last_img read more

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first_img [email protected] Tags biotechnologyBostonneurologySTAT+ By Adam Feuerstein and Damian Garde Jan. 29, 2021 Reprints Log In | Learn More What is it? Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. Damian Garde FDA delays approval decision for Biogen’s Alzheimer’s treatment Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Adam Feuerstein Ruby Wallau for STAT GET STARTEDcenter_img [email protected] @adamfeuerstein Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @damiangarde Biotech The Food and Drug Administration is delaying its decision on Biogen’s closely watched Alzheimer’s drug aducanumab, requesting more evidence that the treatment can slow the cognitive decline associated with the disease, the company said Friday.The FDA had promised to render a decision on the approval of aducanumab by March 7. The process is now being extended by three months to June 7, the company said. About the Authors Reprints What’s included? National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast.last_img read more

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first_imgFORT MYERS, Fla. — A motorcycle and semi-truck crashed on Colonial Boulevard near Summerlin Road on Monday night.Traffic on westbound Colonial Boulevard was backed up as crews worked to clear the scene.The motorcycle involved in the crash was on its side the in the road and the semi-truck was stopped partially in the median.Officers with the Fort Myers Police Department responded to the scene. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments WATCH: Cars driving nose to bumper on Fort Myers highway May 24, 2021 Advertisement RELATEDTOPICS Car thief speeding down McGregor Blvd flips stolen vehicle in overnight crash June 3, 2021 AdvertisementTags: Colonial BoulevardMotorcycle crashcenter_img Motorcyclist rushed to the hospital after Fort Myers crash June 7, 2021 Two people taken to hospital after Gateway motorcycle crash May 27, 2021 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments AdvertisementIt’s not known if anyone was injured in the crash or what caused it. Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_img Previous articleLaois hits hottest temperature in midlands as possibility of further weather warningNext articleLaois minors suffer Kildare defeat in sweltering conditions Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. LIVE BLOG: Follow all the action as the Laois minors face Kildare Home Sport GAA LIVE BLOG: Follow all the action as the Laois minors face Kildare SportGAAGaelic Football Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding By Alan Hartnett – 27th June 2018 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Twitter While there are three new faces in the forward line. Ballyroan-Abbey’s Cathal Doyle replaces clubmate Enda McWey at half forward and there are two changes in the full forward line.Arles-Killeen’s Oisin Byrne and Portarlington’s Rioghan Murphy drop to the bench with Killeshin’s Ross Bolger and St Joseph’s Seamus Farrelly coming in.This is potentially a must win game for Laois if they wish to reach the Leinster championship semi finals.If they fail to defeat Kildare, they may be overtaken by Longford or Carlow who both also clash tomorrow night and then have one further game remaining each while Laois will be finished.And you can follow all the action as it happens below: Rugby We are live from St Conleth’s Park in Newbridge Community center_img SEE ALSO – Where Things Stand: A rundown of all the adult GAA leagues in Laois Pinterest Pinterest Brought to you in association with Joe Mallon Motors PortlaoiseThe Laois minor footballers will be looking to reach the Leinster semi finals when they face Kildare this evening.At 7.30pm today, they will go head to head against their opponents in St Conleth’s Park Newbridge in the fourth round of the Leinster championship.It is potentially a season defining match for Laois.Manager Donncha Phelan has made five changes to the team which drew with Carlow a few weeks ago.Mikey Bennett returns to the team at full back with his Portarlington cousin Cathal Bennett moving to centre back and Stradbally’s Eamonn Delaney moving to the bench.There is another change in midfield as Seán Michael Corcoran starts there with St Joseph’s Josh Lacey also dropping to the bench. WhatsApp WhatsApp Ten Laois based players named on Leinster rugby U-18 girls squad Community Twitter TAGSLaois v KildareLeinster MFCLive Blog Facebooklast_img read more

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first_imgNewsEconomy US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once again News RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News News Kang Mi JinKang Mi JinKang Mi Jin is a North Korean defector turned journalist who fled North Korea in 2009. She has a degree in economics and writes largely on marketization and economy-related issues for Daily NK. Questions about her articles can be directed to [email protected] Koryolink changes numbers for Kim Il Sung’s birth yearcenter_img Facebook Twitter By Kang Mi Jin – 2015.11.25 10:04am Koryolink, one of two majortelecommunications providers in North Korea, has recently amended its numberassignment policy to incorporate Kim Il Sung’s birth year, Daily NKhas learned. Koryolink, a joint venture with theEgypitan company Orascom, provides service for inland regions includingPyongyang while Kangsung Net services more northern areas such as Yanggang andboth Hamgyong Provinces. Areas serviced byKoryolink, which includes Pyongyang, have phone numbers beginning with ‘191’ (191O-OOO-OOO), while areasthat are under the service provider Kangsung Net have phone numbers beginningwith ‘195’ (195O-OOO-OOO). But recently, according to a Daily NK source in thecapital, as part of a propaganda campaign to celebrate Kim Il Sung’s year ofbirth–1912–the authorities have required that Koryolink add a ‘2’ to the endof its ‘191’ numbers so that all citizens have phone numbers beginning with‘1912’. Daily NK crosschecked this information withan additional source in Pyongyang. She added that this change will also apply to foreign residents.The southern areas, such as South HamgyeongProvince, have many Koryolink subscribers with 191 numbers, although thenorthern areas including North Hamgyong Province are primarily serviced byKangsung Net, so phone numbers beginning with 195 are the norm there. Althoughthe services available through each provider, including access to the Party-runpublication Rodong Sinmun, are nearly identical, Kangsung Net is slightlycheaper and thus preferred by customers. Kangsung Net’s service comes with a baserate of 200 minutes, and there is a charge of 30 KPW for exceeding this limit.In addition, subscribers to Koryolink must use a foreign currency card in orderto purchase additional minutes. Kangsung Net allows subscribers to pay theirphone bills in local currency–an increasingly rare case amid a prevalence of and preference for foreign currencies. Koryolink subscribers must pay a fee of3000 KPW [0.35 USD] each quarter, which comes out to an average of 1000 KPW [0.12 USD] more than whatKangsung Net subscribers pay. The first 200 minutes of phone calls are free,but for citizens who run businesses or do other commercial activities, this isoften inadequate. As a result, many people purchase cards worth about12,000-25,000 KPW [1.40-2.90 USD] to make phone calls. Meanwhile, as previously reported by Daily NK, cell phone coverage for domestic networks now extends into China. Proposal to shift “general markets” to “specialized markets” finds little support among N. Korean leaders SHARE North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) last_img read more

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