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first_imgOn Thursday night, Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke appeared on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to perform his latest single, “Daily Battles“, written for the forthcoming film, Motherless Brooklyn. You can watch the haunting, solo piano performance below:Thom Yorke – “Daily Battles” – 11/14/19[Video: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert]During a recent episode of Live From Here with Chris Thile, Edward Norton explained that he commissioned the song from Yorke because he felt the Radiohead frontman was the perfect person to capture the essence of the film’s main character—a private detective with Tourette’s syndrome—and the general societal outlook in the 1950s.As Norton explained, he wanted some music “that reflected the dissonance of [the main character’s] sensitive mind. And if there’s anyone in my generation who has captured both longing in the heart and terror and dissonance in the head, it’s Thom Yorke.”After Thom wrote the song, they worked with Wynton Marsalis to arrange a version of the song in the style of Miles Davis for the film. You can watch the full segment below and listen to both the Thom Yorke and Wynton Marsalis studio versions of “Daily Battles” here.Edward Norton Talks Motherless Brooklyn, Thom Yorke, Miles Davis, Wynton Marsalis, & More – Live From Here – 10/12/19[Video: Live From Here]Thom Yorke recently announced a string of 2020 tour dates with Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes, which features Yorke, frequent collaborator Nigel Godrich, and visual artist Tarik Barri.last_img read more

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first_imgEmail This study is the one of the first to use whole-brain connectome imaging to examine how disruptions to white matter connectivity after stroke affect language abilities. White matter fiber tracts are the insulated wires that connect one area of the brain to others. White matter is named for the myelin sheaths (insulation) that cover the many axons (wires) that make up the fiber tracts.“If you have two brain areas and both of them have to work together in order to carry out a function and the stroke lesion takes out axons that connect those brain areas–the two areas are intact but the communication between them is disrupted and so there is dysfunction,” said Yourganov.Currently, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used after stroke to assess lesions in the cortical tissue–the brain’s grey matter. However, the extent of cortical damage often does not correlate with the severity of language deficits.“Stroke patients sometimes have significant impairments beyond the amount of cortical damage,” said Bonilha. “It is also hard to predict how well a patient will recover based on the cortical lesion alone.”Could connectome-based imaging be a useful complement for assessing damage to the brain’s connections after stroke and for guiding rehabilitative therapy?The study led by Bonilha took an important first step toward answering these questions. The study, which enrolled 90 patients at MUSC and USC with aphasia due to a single stroke occurring no less than six months prior, assessed four areas related to speech/language using the Western Aphasia Battery–speech fluency, auditory comprehension, speech repetition, and oral naming–as well as a summary score of overall aphasia. Within two days of behavior assessment, each of the patients underwent imaging studies–both T1- and T2- weighted MRI, typically used after stroke to map cortical damage, and diffusion imaging, used for connectome mapping.The team then used a type of machine learning algorithm–support vector regression (SVR)–to analyze the imaging results and make predictions about each patient’s language deficits. In essence, an algorithm was created that could derive the WAB score from either a feature relevant to imaging of the grey matter damage by structural MRI or a feature relevant to connectome imaging of the brain’s white matter fiber tracts. The team used 89 of the 90 patients as training sets for SVR and then used the algorithm to predict language defect/preservation in the 90th patient. This was done for each of the 90 patients and, in each patient, for both features identified via structural MRI and connectome imaging.The accuracy of the algorithm’s prediction of WAB score for each patient was then assessed by comparing it to the WAB score determined via behavioral testing. Connectome-based analysis was as accurate as cortical lesion mapping for predicting WAB scores. In fact, it was better at predicting auditory comprehension scores than was lesion-based imaging using structural MRI and only slightly less accurate at predicting speech fluency, speech repetition, and naming scores.The study demonstrates that damage to the white matter fiber tracts that connect the brain’s regions plays a role beyond cortical damage in language impairment after stroke. Furthermore, this study also discloses that connections in the brain’s parietal region are particularly important for language function, especially fluency. This region is less likely to sustain damage after stroke, even in patients who experience aphasia, suggesting that damage or preservation of the brain’s connections in this region could play a key role in determining who will experience aphasia and who will have the best chances for recovery. The integrity of these connections could not be mapped with conventional structural MRI but can now be assessed through connectome-based analysis.The study findings also suggest that connectome-based analysis could be used to inform a more individualized approach to stroke care. Because the algorithms developed using these study patients as the training set are generalizable to a broader stroke population, connectome-based analysis could one day be used to identify the distinctive features of each patient’s stroke–which connections have been lost and which preserved–and then the algorithm could be used to predict the type and severity of language impairment and the potential for recovery. This information could then be used to direct rehabilitative therapy to improve outcomes.“By mapping much more accurately the individual pattern of brain structural connectivity in a stroke survivor, we can determine the integrity of neuronal networks and better understand what was lesioned and how that relates to language abilities that are lost,” said Bonilha. “This is, broadly stated, a measure of post-stroke brain health. It is the individual signature pattern that could also be used to inform about the personalized potential for recovery with therapy and guide treatments to focus on the deficient components of the network.” LinkedIn Pinterest Share on Facebookcenter_img Share on Twitter Loss or impairment of the ability to speak is one of the most feared complications of stroke–one faced by about 20% of stroke patients. Language, as one of the most complex functions of the brain, is not seated in a single brain region but involves connections between many regions.In an article published in the June 22, 2016 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the University of South Carolina (USC) report that mapping all of the brain’s white matter connections after stroke, in addition to imaging the areas of cortical tissue damage, could better predict which patients will have language deficits and how severe those deficits will be. The totality of the brain’s connections is referred to as the connectome.“Imaging the connectome of patients after stroke enables the identification of individual signatures of brain organization that can be used to predict the nature and severity of language deficits and one day could be used to guide therapy,” said MUSC Health neurologist Leonardo Bonilha M.D., Ph.D., senior author on the Journal of Neuroscience article, whose laboratory focuses on connectome imaging, particularly as it relates to language loss after stroke. Grigori Yourganov, Ph.D., is the first author on the article. Julius Fridriksson, Ph.D., Chris Rorden, Ph.D., and Ezequiel Gleichgerrcht, Ph.D, aphasia researchers at USC who recently received NIH funding to establish a Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery and who are long-time collaborators of the Bonilha laboratory, are also authors on the article. Sharelast_img read more

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first_imgALEXANDRIA – Super Eagles head coach Gernot Rohr expects a difficult encounter and says his team will enjoy no physical advantage when they play debutants Madagascar in their final Group B match in the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations on Sunday.Madagascar were in action against Burundi on Thursday, a day after Nigeria beat Guinea but speaking at the pre-match conference earlier today, Rohr said an extra day rest would confer no extra advantage on his team ahead of the 5pm encounter at the Alexandria Stadium tomorrow.“I don’t believe that they are tired because they won the game [against Burundi] and they are a team with good staff,” Rohr said.Download audio“I know them: the physiotherapist, fitness coaches, Nicolas Dupuis is also a very good coach in France so they will be very fit. I saw that the team has an average age of over 29 years, so they have the experience to recover very quickly and they started like us in the same day and we will play tomorrow match which will be very tough against this good team of Madagascar.”Nigeria are already through to the knockout round after winning both their matches and require just a point to top the group while Madagascar have four points and need a point to ensure progress although they are practically through with Guinea the only team capable of matching their four points with a victory against Burundi tomorrow.Despite having already qualified, Rohr says Nigeria will take tomorrow’s encounter against a Madagascar side he believes have shown better attacking qualities than the Super Eagles very seriously. Nigeria’s coach believes the Eagles must be very vigilant to guard against the set-piece prowess of tomorrow’s opponents and continue to exhibit the defensive solidity that has seen them yet to concede in Egypt.  Download audio“We saw them doing better than us in scoring three goals against teams we only scored two so they were better offensively against them,” Rohr said.“We had solid performance in our two games we didn’t concede a goal so there will be really an interesting match to see against a team which has a lot of offensive qualities, also they scored some free kicks, some corners and we saw them yesterday, they made a very good match and I think they will be fine.”“Also, in the group, because the winner will be on the top so it’s a big motivation for us to win this game again even if we know that a draw is enough for us to finish on top but we play to win our games all the time.”Nigeria’s head coach also revealed that with many players now back to full fitness, he intends to “put everybody under pressure” and would be making a number of changes to the starting lineup against Madagascar.Download audio“I can say yes [there would be changes] because I want to put everybody under pressure to be concerned about the matches,” Rohr said.“There’s competition in each position now, even in the goalkeeper department, even in the central defence, even for the striker positions and so we will see in the last training tonight which changes we can do you saw that already between the two first matches, we had  five changes and its possible there will be changes in the match for tomorrow.”On the possibility of injured fullbacks Jamilu Collins and Shehu Abdullahi making the team tomorrow, Rohr said Sunday’s encounter would be too soon for the duo but expects them to be ready in time for the Eagles game in the knockout stage. He also added that with their replacements having performed well, there was no need to take a “risk” rushing the players back.Download audio“They are on the good way now, they are making special training sessions with the physical coach and the physio, even this morning and I hope they will be available for the next game not for this one, this one is too short.“We don’t want to take any risks we have twenty-one players we have enough [and] Awaziem and Ola Aina did very well the job we didn’t concede any goals so there is no reason to take a risk to bring them in tomorrow.”Relatedlast_img read more

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first_img Premier League executive chairman Richard Scudamore 1 Richard Scudamore has revealed the Premier League saw “nothing” from Euro 2016 to provide cause for concern over the development of English players.The organisation reviewed England’s performances and, despite the 2-1 defeat by Iceland being considered among the worst in their history, remains confident in the players’ ability.Sam Allardyce has been appointed as England’s new manager, and on Monday he spoke of his belief the squad had been good enough to win Euro 2016.The Premier League’s verdict is similarly positive, and executive chairman Scudamore insisted they saw no need to implement change to further strengthen the national team’s chances.“We did our own post-Euros discussion, and there is nothing we saw that put us off the journey,” said the 56-year-old.“In other words, we know we’re producing good players, we saw nothing that said ‘Oh, Christ’.“Whereas, if you go back to England-Croatia (a 3-2 home defeat in 2007 that cost England qualification for Euro 2008), Steve McClaren and the umbrella, we were so angry we went and got Ged (Roddy, the Premier League’s director of football development).“We said, ‘We have to change, we have to change’, but we saw nothing in the Euros, either from other teams or from ourselves, quite frankly, that said we have to change the journey.”Roy Hodgson’s side was a young selection in which the talents of Eric Dier, Dele Alli, Harry Kane and Raheem Sterling were central.Roddy, who was speaking alongside Scudamore at the launch of the Premier League 2, added: “When we started out, lots of people would say to us, ‘There’s no English talent’. And now they say, ‘Actually there is English talent, but it needs opportunity’.“That is a seismic shift from where we were only four seasons ago.”last_img read more

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