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first_imgLezyne teased their Smart Connect light concept earlier this year when they called out new connectivity functions in a revamped line-up of affordable GPS cycling computers. But while little detailed information had been available, we now had a chance to play with the Smart Connectivity to see how & why you might want to control a set of bike lights from either your GPS or a mobile phone.Plus, Lezyne’s original compact little Femto front & rear lights get a much needed USB-rechargeable update…Lezyne Smart Connect customizable LED bike lightsThe most obvious benefit of Smart Connect is customization. With six or more steady & flash modes available with most of Lezyne’s bike lights, it can just be nice to pare down to the three or so that you might actually want to regularly use.Smart Connect also lets you connect multiple lights together. The typical setup allows you to pair a front & rear light together, then you can actually operate both in sync by only using one set of controls. That means you can use the button on the front light to turn both front & rear on or off, and to cycle through their modes together. Or of course you can use the Lezyne Ally mobile app, or one of their latest cycling computers.More than just pairing & simplifying steady or flashing modes, the mobile app allows you to create up to four light pair modes, so you can mix & match for your ideal setup.For example, preconfigure: 1. a daytime riding mode with bright daytime flash (DTF), 2. a morning/evening commute mode with daytime flash up front & pulse in the rear for low light visibility, and 3. a night mode with full-power Blast up front & fast flash in the rear for optimal visibility riding in the dark. You can make whatever combination you think works best.Then you can quickly cycle through your custom preset modes via the buttons on your connected cycling computer or either of the lights themselves. (The mode control on the mobile phone app is mostly intended for easy customization, but you can cycle through modes there too.)Smart Connect availabilityLezyne Mega Drive 1800i & KTV Pro Smart Connect Rear comboSo far, we’ve seen four Smart Connect capable front lights – the Mega Drive 1800i, Super Drive 1600XXL, new Connect Smart 1000XL, & new KTV Pro Smart Connect Front.The 206g Mega Drive 1800i is the next generation of the Deca Drive, ratcheting up power output another 300 lumens to 1800 lumens max with additional cooling fins. The 3-LED light features a brighter spot in the center of the beam pattern, supported by wide angle lighting to the sides. the 1800i is the most advanced light that Lezyne sells, with auto Day/Night modes controlled by an ambient light sensor, remote switch & external extra battery pack compatible, and now with Smart Connect. It is available on its own, or in a Loaded Kit with the smart taillight, the extra Infinite Light power pack, extra direct/bar mounts & a storage case.The 193g SuperDrive 1600XXL is a similar update with a slightly higher power output than before up a hundred lumens to 1600 lumens max, and improved CNC alloy cooling fins. Like the Mega, it also gets Tri-Focus Optics, auto Day/Night control, the ability to run an external remote switch, and up to 148 hour burn time in the lowest power setting. It also is available on its own, or in a simpler Loaded Kit with the smart taillight.The 152g Connect Smart 1000XL is a connected update of the Lite Drive with a max 1000 lumen output in DTF and max 87 hour runtime in the low-power Femto mode. It will be available as a set, paired with the KTV Pro Smart Connect Rear taillight.Lezyne KTV Pro Smart PairThe new 47.5g KTV Pro Smart Connect Front is designed to be a compact, lightweight front light to pair with a KTV rear in the new KTV Pro Smart Pair combo kit. It puts out a max 200 lumen output in DTF, or a max 20 hour Flash runtime.For rear lights, there looks to be just one option – the new 45g KTV Pro Smart Connect Rear. It puts out a mac 75 lumens with a 19.5 hour Flash runtime, uses a wide angle lens for 270° visibility. Both KTV Pro lights are rechargeable with a built-in USB plug so no cables are needed, just stick it directly into a USB port for 3hr charge.New 2020 Smart Connect pricing & availability hasn’t been announced yet, but we expect to hear more in the next week or two.Lezyne Femto USB Drive, rechargeable mini blinkie light refreshTiny Femto LEDs have been in the Lezyne line-up almost from their first bike lights. The idea was always small & simple – a tiny, low-cost light that would strap around your bar or seatpost to make you more visible.Now, a refresh brings the Femto USB Drive – 15lumen front/5 lumen rear light output, five light modes, Wide Angle Optics for greater than 180° visibility, and long battery life (22hr front/15hr rear) with easy micro-USB cable recharging (2.5hr charge time.)The new Femto USB lights are IPX7 water resistant, easy to install with rubber strap mount, and use a lightweight (22g front/23g rear) cast alloy body. They are available in four colors (black, white, red & blue) and separately for 16€ each or 30€ for a pair.Ride.Lezyne.comlast_img read more

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first_imgA study today in Open Forum Infectious Diseases has found that consultation with an infectious disease (ID) physician is associated with significant reductions in mortality in patients with certain multidrug-resistant (MDR) infections.The single-center study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that 30-day mortality in patients with MDR Staphylococcus aureus was 52% percent lower when ID specialists were involved in care, and 59% lower in patients with MDR Enterobacteriaceae. ID consultation remained associated with reduced mortality in patients with these infections 1 year later.While previous research has shown that ID consultation is associated with reductions in mortality, treatment failure, and readmission for patients with different types of infections, few studies have looked specifically at how ID specialists can affect outcomes for patients infected with invasive MDR organisms (MDROs). The lead author of the study says the findings reiterate the critical role of ID specialists in helping patients with these types of infections, especially at a time when antibiotic resistance—including with MDROs—is becoming an increasing problem in healthcare.”If there was a drug that reduced heart-attack mortality by 50%, you can bet all the cardiac patients would be on it,” Jason Burnham, MD, an infectious disease specialist and instructor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine, told CIDRAP News. “I think we provide a benefit that not everyone is aware of.”Reductions in mortality, readmissionThe retrospective cohort study, conducted at a 1,250-bed academic medical center in St. Louis from 2006 through 2015, analyzed hospitalized patients with MDR Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus spp., S aureus (including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S aureus), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Acinetobacter spp. isolated from a sterile site, such as the bloodstream, or from a bronchoalveolar lavage/bronchial wash culture.The primary end points were death and readmission after infection. The association of these end points with ID consultation was determined using Cox proportional hazards models, a statistical method for investigation the association between the survival time of patients and one or more variables.Overall, 4,214 patients with MDRO were identified; 840 (19.9%) died or were discharged on hospice within 30 days of the first positive culture, and 1,832 (43.5%) died within 1 year. Among 2,371 patients without an ID consult, 578 (24.4%) died within 30 days of positive culture, and 1,115 (47.0%) died within a year; among the 1,843 patients who had ID consults, 262 (14.2%) died within 30 days, and 717 (38.9%) died within a year.After multivariable adjustment, ID consultation was significantly associated with reductions in 30-day and 1-year all-cause mortality for MDR S aureus (hazard ratio [HR], 0.48 and 0.73, respectively) and MDR Enterobacteriaceae (HR, 0.41 and HR 0.74), as well as 30-day mortality risk in patients with several different MDR infections.For MDR Enterococcus infections, ID consultation was marginally associated with reductions in all-cause mortality at 30 days (HR, 0.81). No association between ID consultation and reduced mortality was found for patients with Acinetobacter or Pseudomonas infections, the two smallest groups on the study.ID consultation was also associated with reduced risk of 30-day readmission, but only for patients with MDR Enterobacteriaceae (HR, 0.74). Burnham said the lack of an association between ID consultation and readmission for other MDR pathogens could be due to small sample size or underlying medical conditions in the patients, such as diabetes or heart problems, that may have resulted in hospital readmission. “Sometimes it’s hard to prevent a readmission,” he said.Since Burnham and his colleagues did not have access to drug administration data, they can’t definitively attribute the reduced mortality to higher rates of appropriate antibiotic therapy. But Burnham speculates that understanding the right antibiotic therapy likely plays a role.”Because we’re trained in this, we know which antibiotics to give…so it seems quite logical that we’d be better equipped to choose the most appropriate therapy,” he said. “Sometimes that doesn’t necessarily just mean knowing which antibiotic fits up with the susceptibility profile of the organism. It might mean the one that’s best for their kidneys, or maybe they need two because they have a hard-to-control infection.”Breadth of expertiseAs an ID specialist, Burnham isn’t surprised by the results of the study. But he said that not everyone, including other physicians, is aware of the breadth of ID specialists’ expertise. It’s more, he explained, than simply understanding the appropriate drug-bug match.Burnham brought up methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) as an example to illustrate his point. While MRSA in the bloodstream is a serious problem, he explained, the pathogen is also notorious for “hiding” on heart valves, in prosthetic joints, and in the spine. Because ID specialists know this, they might recommend spinal imaging studies or heart ultrasounds for patients who showing typical invasive MRSA symptoms like fever and chills but may not have the bacteria in their bloodstream—something that might not occur to non-specialists.In addition, patients with MDROs frequently have to be put on intravenous antibiotics, which tend to be more toxic and require closer monitoring for appropriate levels and potential interactions.Burnham said it’s the deep understanding of these issues, from source control to drug toxicities, that makes ID specialists so valuable.”It’s a very complicated area, and because we do it all the time we’re more comfortable with it, but not everyone necessarily is,” he said. “If you needed brain surgery, you’d go see a brain surgeon, so if you have a bad infection, you want to see an infectious disease doctor.”Unfortunately, Burnham noted, there aren’t enough ID physicians to see all the patients with bad infections. And interest in the field appears to be waning. A 2017 paper in Clinical Infectious Diseases noted that the number of trainees entering the specialty has plummeted since 2011, and that ID continues to have a substantially higher percentage of vacant positions than most other medical specialties.”In an ideal world, we would increase the capacity of the infectious disease profession to see all these patients…but I’m not certain that’s possible,” Burnham said. One solution, he suggested, might be the development of an algorithm that can determine levels of ID complexity. That might enable hospitals to figure out patients who may not need an ID specialist but could be helped by an ID pharmacist.”Maybe that would be a way to get infectious disease involvement for the patients who need it,” he said.  See also:Mar 15 Open Forum Infect Dis studylast_img read more

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first_imgAdvertisement tc4wuNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs9ceWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Expsc( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 3y4Would you ever consider trying this?😱2ah6Can your students do this? 🌚bn8ksRoller skating! Powered by Firework Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder are set for a big heavyweight showdown at the Staples Center in Los Angles, California on Dec. 1.Advertisement This is the biggest heavyweight fight to be staged on the American soil in a long long time and for the first time in more than a decade, a heavyweight clash is scheduled to air on Pay-per-view.Advertisement The tickets are moving very fast and demands are very high and the successful three-city promotional tour has definitely caused a huge buzz amongst boxing fans as they managed to sell $1million (£770,000) of tickets in just 25 minutes.In an interview with Michelle Joey Phelps from Behind the gloves broke the news to wilder.Advertisement And he looks at the camera, says “oh my God,” before dropping to the floor. But the 32-year-old was only messing around and manages to get back to his feet.“I appreciate you guys so much, two months still to go let’s go baby.” Wilder said.VIDEO:Also Read-Boxing: Tyson Fury vs Deontay Wilder is OFFICIAL   Advertisementlast_img read more

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