Tag: 爱上海LD

first_imgThe Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series and NASCAR XFINITY Series are at Phoenix Raceway this weekend. Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series (Race is Sunday, 3:30 p.m. ET, FOX)Stage 1: Ends on Lap 75Stage 2: Ends on Lap 150Final Stage: Scheduled to end on Lap 312 Below are the stage lengths for each race. Click here to bookmark stage lengths for every race this season. BUY TICKETS: See the races in Phoenix RELATED: Full schedule for Phoenix XFINITY Series (Race is Saturday, 4 p.m. ET, FOX)Stage 1: Ends on Lap 60 Stage 2: Ends on Lap 120 Final Stage: Scheduled to end on Lap 200last_img read more

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreSince astronomers confirmed the presence of planets beyond our solar system, called exoplanets, humanity has wondered how many could harbor life. Now, we’re one step closer to finding an answer.NASA/Jpl-Caltech/T. PyleAccording to new research using data from NASA’s retired planet-hunting mission, the Kepler space telescope, about half the stars similar in temperature to our Sun could have a rocky planet capable of supporting liquid water on its surface.Our galaxy holds at least an estimated 300 million of these potentially habitable worlds, based on even the most conservative interpretation of the results in a new study to be published in The Astronomical Journal. This new finding is a significant step forward in Kepler’s original mission to understand how many potentially habitable worlds exist in our galaxy. Previous estimates of the frequency, also known as the occurrence rate, of such planets ignored the relationship between the star’s temperature and the kinds of light given off by the star and absorbed by the planet.The new analysis accounts for these relationships, and provides a more complete understanding of whether or not a given planet might be capable of supporting liquid water, and potentially life. That approach is made possible by combining Kepler’s final dataset of planetary signals with data about each star’s energy output from an extensive trove of data from the European Space Agency’s Gaia mission.“We always knew defining habitability simply in terms of a planet’s physical distance from a star, so that it’s not too hot or cold, left us making a lot of assumptions,” said Ravi Kopparapu, an author on the paper and a scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “Gaia’s data on stars allowed us to look at these planets and their stars in an entirely new way.”Gaia provided information about the amount of energy that falls on a planet from its host star based on a star’s flux, or the total amount of energy that is emitted in a certain area over a certain time. This allowed the researchers to approach their analysis in a way that acknowledged the diversity of the stars and solar systems in our galaxy.“Not every star is alike,” said Kopparapu. “And neither is every planet.”Though the exact effect is still being researched, a planet’s atmosphere figures into how much light is needed to allow liquid water on a planet’s surface as well. Using a conservative estimate of the atmosphere’s effect, the researchers estimated an occurrence rate of about 50% — that is, about half of Sun-like stars have rocky planets capable of hosting liquid water on their surfaces. An alternative optimistic definition of the habitable zone estimates about 75%.Kepler’s Legacy Charts Future ResearchThis result builds upon a long legacy of work of analyzing Kepler data to obtain an occurrence rate and sets the stage for future exoplanet observations informed by how common we now expect these rocky, potentially habitable worlds to be. Future research will continue to refine the rate, informing the likelihood of finding these kinds of planets and feeding into plans for the next stages of exoplanet research, including future telescopes.MORE: Today Marks 3000 Days on Mars For the Genius ’Curiosity Rover‘ –See Celebration Photos From the Red Planet“Knowing how common different kinds of planets are is extremely valuable for the design of upcoming exoplanet-finding missions,” said co-author Michelle Kunimoto, who worked on this paper after finishing her doctorate on exoplanet occurrence rates at the University of British Columbia, and recently joined the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “Surveys aimed at small, potentially habitable planets around Sun-like stars will depend on results like these to maximize their chance of success.”RELATED: NASA Uses Supercomputers and AI to Count Earth’s Trees From Space for the First TimeAfter revealing more than 2,800 confirmed planets outside our solar system, the data collected by the Kepler space telescope continues to yield important new discoveries about our place in the universe. Though Kepler’s field of view covered only 0.25% of the sky, the area that would be covered by your hand if you held it up at arm’s length towards the sky, its data has allowed scientists to extrapolate what the mission’s data means for the rest of the galaxy. That work continues with TESS, NASA’s current planet hunting telescope.CHECK OUT: Australia Blows Science’s Collective Mind by Mapping 3 Million Galaxies in 300 Hours“To me, this result is an example of how much we’ve been able to discover just with that small glimpse beyond our solar system,” said Bryson. “What we see is that our galaxy is a fascinating one, with fascinating worlds, and some that may not be too different from our own.”Source: NASA, Original written by Frank Tavares, NASA’s Ames Research Center.SHARE the Far-Out News from NASA With Your Pals…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Some of these exoplanets could even be our interstellar neighbors, with at least four potentially within 30 light-years of our Sun and the closest likely to be at most about 20 light-years from us. These are the minimum numbers of such planets based on the most conservative estimate that 7% of Sun-like stars host such worlds. However, at the average expected rate of 50%, there could be many more.This research helps us understand the potential for these planets to have the elements to support life. This is an essential part of astrobiology, the study of life’s origins and future in our universe.The study is authored by NASA scientists who worked on the Kepler mission alongside collaborators from around the world. NASA retired the space telescope in 2018 after it ran out of fuel. Nine years of the telescope’s observations revealed that there are billions of planets in our galaxy—more planets than stars.“Kepler already told us there were billions of planets, but now we know a good chunk of those planets might be rocky and habitable,” said the lead author Steve Bryson, a researcher at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley. “Though this result is far from a final value, and water on a planet’s surface is only one of many factors to support life, it’s extremely exciting that we calculated these worlds are this common with such high confidence and precision.”For the purposes of calculating this occurrence rate, the team looked at exoplanets between a radius of 0.5 and 1.5 times that of Earth’s, narrowing in on planets that are most likely rocky. They also focused on stars similar to our Sun in age and temperature, plus or minus up to 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit.That’s a wide range of different stars, each with its own particular properties impacting whether the rocky planets in its orbit are capable of supporting liquid water. These complexities are partly why it is so difficult to calculate how many potentially habitable planets are out there, especially when even our most powerful telescopes can just barely detect these small planets. That’s why the research team took a new approach.Rethinking How to Identify Habitabilitylast_img read more

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first_img Sharing is caring! Share EducationLocalNewsPrimary Khobie Darroux’s winning short story by: Dominica Vibes News – June 12, 2015 Share 424 Views   3 commentscenter_img Share Tweet The following is a short story written by Khobie Darroux, 7, of the Convent Preparatory School in the Grade Two Class’ Short Writing Competition.The competition was initiated by class teacher Lenore Zamore as part of efforts to motivate students and nurture their writing skills.The students were asked to write one (1) paragraph of 100 words on the topic: Pretend you are a snack kit, describe how you spend your day.Eighteen (18) students participated and in the competition and five (5) were selected to be featured on DA Vibes Inc’s website and The Chronicle Newspaper.Khobie Darroux, who second place to Rohaan Pascal. His short story was featured yesterday.“I am a pink and purple snack kit. Today is my favourite day because it’s fruit day. Khobie packed me with water, juice, mango, oranges and a banana. I like fruit day because fruits make Khobie strong and healthy. I arrive at school at 8 o’clock and I sit on the bench outside the classroom. I can’t wait for break time. Ring! Ring! 10:15! Khobie joins her friends and we all go to the eating area. Khobie opens me and shares the fruits with her friends. After the peelings are thrown in the bin, I sit on the bench. When we get home Mommy cleans me and I’m ready for tomorrow”.Ahmik Hunter, 8, placed 3rd, Ciara Gachette, 7, placed 4th and Tamarind Slater, 8, placed 5th.The other three short stories will be featured subsequently.last_img read more

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first_imgRelated2019 AITEO Cup Final: Kaduna Comes Alive as Pillars, Tornadoes, Amazons, and Angels Battle for GloryJuly 28, 2019In “Federation Cup”Women’s AITEO Cup: Bayelsa Queens, Abia Angels & Ibom Angels progress to semisSeptember 23, 2017In “Nigeria”Angels, Queens, and Amazons Clash for Berth in 2019 Women’s FinalJuly 3, 2019In “FA Cup” KADUNA – Nasarawa Amazons are the 2019 Aiteo Cup champions after they dethroned 8-time defending champions 5-4 in a penalty shootout at the Ahmadu Bello Stadium, Kaduna.Saiki Mary scored the decisive kick for Amazons after Rita Orji had missed from the spot after the game ended goalless in regulation time.In a largely uneventful game played in front of a respectable crowd, top dignitaries of the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) and government functionaries, it was Amazons who last won the Aiteo Cup in 2005 that were the better side and although penalties are no measure of a team’s prowess, Rivers Angel can have no real complaints having been second best throughout.NFF 2nd Vice President and LMC Chairman Shehu DikkoNFF 1st Vice President Barr. Seyi AkinwunmiChances were few and far in between with Vivian Ikechukwu shining the brightest for Angels while Igboamalu Chinyere and Ejaloniba Adegoke both went close for Amazons.But with no real penetration from either side, it was no surprise that the game ended goalless and headed straight to penalties.Angels have held such a stranglehold on the trophy having won the trophy eight times in the last nine years and were perhaps hopeful that penalty kicks would swing the tide in their favour.And indeed, the spot-kick went as planned until Rita Orji faltered in Angels’ fourth from the spot. Philip Lola then held her nerve to put Amazons 4-3 up and although Evelyn Nwabuoku scored to keep Angels in it, Saiki Mary was a picture of calm as she rolled in the winning spot-kick to hand Amazons a first triumph in the Aiteo Cup in fourteen years.last_img read more

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