Tag: 爱上海KH

first_imgOn Monday afternoon in Hoie Hall at St. Luke’s Church in East Hampton, the Ladies’ Village Improvement Society shared their concern for keeping East Hampton Village beautiful. In honor of Arbor Day on April 27, the LVIS held a panel discussion, inviting four top local tree experts, Deborah Green from Bartlett Tree Experts, Mike Gaines from CW Arborists, Charlie Marder from Marders, and Mariah Whitmore from Whitmore’s, to take turns speaking about everything “tree,” from planning, selecting, and caring for our precious resource. LVIS President Anne Thomas and Olivia Brooks, LVIS Vice Chair of Trees, welcomed the guests and introduced the speakers. Sharelast_img read more

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first_img GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMES KUWANA, MIE PREF. – Tatsunori Nukaga followed his first-round 64 with a 2-under 69 on Friday to hold a two-shot lead at the halfway stage of the season-opening Token Homemate Cup.Ryo Ishikawa recovered from three dropped shots in his first three holes to shoot his second straight 69, leaving him five strokes off the pace in a tie for 16th at Token Tado Country Club. IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5center_img Nukaga got to 9 under for the tournament in the hunt for his first career JGTO Tour title.The long-hitting 28-year-old eagled the par-5 fourth hole by hitting a 4-iron second shot to about 10 feet. His round also included three birdies and three bogeys.“Things were completely different from yesterday, including the quality of my play,” Nukaga said. “It was chilly out there in the morning. I had a hard time controlling the distance of my shots, but I played patiently and somehow eked out a good round.“I never expected to be the tournament leader after two rounds. This is my first experience taking the lead into the weekend, so I have no idea at this point how I’m going to play the remaining two rounds.”Richard Lee (67) of New Zealand, Satoshi Tomiyama (67) and Yui Ueda (69) were tied for second at 7 under.Four players sat three shots behind Nukaga, including 2010 money leader Kim Kyung Tae of South Korea.Ishikawa, starting his round in the afternoon on the back nine, was in danger of missing the cut after missing a par putt from inside three feet on the 10th hole and hitting his tee shot out of bounds right for double bogey two holes later.But the 20-year-old bounced back with four birdies in a five-hole stretch around the turn and two more at Nos. 7 and 9.“I couldn’t get my rhythm early, but I stayed patient and gradually began to play better,” Ishikawa said. “After driving out of bounds on the 12th, I tried not to make the same mistake again the rest of the way. I made birdies at the 18th and first holes — two tough holes.”Ishikawa returned to Japan last Sunday after playing in eight U.S. PGA events in three months through the Masters Tournament, where he missed the cut for the third time in four Augusta National appearances.He is looking for his 10th career victory on the Japanese tour after a winless 2011.“I’m happy with the way I finished the round today, and from the third round I want to think only about going up on the leaderboard,” Ishikawa said.Tadahiro Takayama, the 2011 Token winner who finished second on last year’s money list, missed the cut by three strokes after a 75 dropped him to 4 over. last_img read more

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first_imgIn a new effort to crack down on illegal immigrants, federal authorities are expected to announce tough rules this week that would require employers to fire workers who use false Social Security numbers. Officials said the rules would be backed up by stepped-up raids on workplaces across the country that employ illegal immigrants. After first proposing the rules last year, Department of Homeland Security officials said they held off finishing them to await the outcome of the debate in Congress over a sweeping immigration bill. That measure, which was supported by President George W. Bush, died in the Senate in June. Now administration officials are signaling that they intend to clamp down on employers of illegal immigrants even without a new immigration law to offer legal status to millions of illegal immigrants already in the work force. “Across the employer community, people are scared, confused, holding their breath,” said Craig Regelbrugge, co-chairman of the Agriculture Coalition for Immigration Reform, a trade organization. “Given what we know about the demographics of our labor force, since we are approaching peak season, people are particularly on edge.” The expected regulations would give employers a fixed period, perhaps up to 90 days, to resolve any discrepancies between identity information provided by their workers and the records of the Social Security Administration. If workers’ documents cannot be verified, employers would be required to fire them or risk up to $10,000 in fines for knowingly hiring illegal immigrants. Immigrant-rights groups and labor unions, including the AFL-CIO, predicted that the rules would unleash discrimination against Hispanic workers. They said they are preparing legal challenges to try to stop them from taking effect. The new rules codify an uneasy partnership between the Department of Homeland Security, which enforces the immigration laws, and the Social Security Administration, which collects identity information from W-2 tax forms of about 250 million workers each year, so it can credit the earnings in its system.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The approach is expected to play well with conservatives who have long demanded that the administration do more to enforce existing immigration laws, but it could also lead to renewed pressure from businesses on Congress to provide legal status for an estimated 6 million unauthorized immigrant workers. “We are tough and we are going to be even tougher,” Russ Knocke, the spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security, said Tuesday. “There are not going to be any more excuses for employers, and there will be serious consequences for those that choose to blatantly disregard the law.” Experts said the new rules represent a major tightening of the immigration-enforcement system, in which employers for decades have paid little attention to notices from the Social Security Administration advising that workers’ names and numbers did not match the agency’s records. Illegal workers often provide employers with false Social Security numbers to qualify for a job. Employers, especially in agriculture and low-wage industries, said they are deeply worried about the new rules, which could force them to lay off thousands of immigrant workers. More than 70 percent of farm workers in the fields of the United States are illegal immigrants, according to estimates by growers associations. last_img read more

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