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first_imgWXYZ via ABCNews.com(DETROIT) — Hockey pucks have been known to cause some serious injuries on the rink, but now school officials are hoping that they can do similar damage in more dangerous situations.Oakland University in Michigan is passing out hockey pucks to be used as possible weapons against mass shooters. The school’s initiative is twofold: circulating hockey pucks around campus in case of a dire situation, and raising funds retrofit the school’s classroom doors so that they can be locked from the inside.The impetus for these efforts in suburban Detroit came after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida in February, in which 17 students and staff members were killed. At the time, Oakland University was on break. But when students came back, they were shaken by what had happened.“I walked into the classroom and a young woman approached me and said ‘Will you please lock the door? After what happened in Florida, I don’t feel safe,’” said Tom Discenna, a communications professor at Oakland University and the president of the school’s chapter of the American Association of University Professors.“At that point, something inside me just kind of snapped,” he added.Training sessions with the university’s police chief, Mark Gordon, were organized for the staff. Gordon cited his experience getting hit with hockey pucks while serving as a youth hockey coach as proof that they could be used to hurt, Discenna said.Beyond the punch they pack, there are some other helpful advantages that hockey pucks provide, he explained.“It’s not considered a weapon, it fits easily into a backpack or a brief case. It has a lot of advantages,” he said.Discenna stressed that while they can be potentially handy in a dire situation, the real point of the hockey pucks is to raise enough money to install thumb locks on the doors across campus. The pucks have the name of the fundraising effort emblazoned on them and the school has received at least $10,000 for the effort so far.The federal guidance on how to respond to active shooters urges people to “Run, Hide, Fight,” in that order. While the pucks are part of the “fight” part of the equation, doors that can be locked from the inside are a critical part of the second phase: hide.As of now, many of the school’s classrooms are only able to be locked from outside, which would mean that a person would have to exit the room during an active shooter situation to secure the room.“Not being able to lock their doors basically puts them in a very vulnerable position if the shooter is nearby and is able to enter their room,” said Steve Gomez, a former FBI special agent and current ABC News contributor.“Those students and faculty that are in classrooms that do not lock from the inside, my suggestion is that if they hear shots being fired, they should immediately position themselves next to the door with an item that can be used to attack the shooter if the shooter enters their classroom,” he added.Gomez said when he speaks to family and friends about what to do in an active shooter situation, he urges them to look around for any objects that could be used to stop the shooter.“A lot of times, whenever I have these discussions, I will look around and say, ‘You can grab that chair, you can grab that trash can.’ If you can’t run or hide, then the fight scenario involves any item you can get your hands on,” he said.As for what that object can be, Gomez said that he’s heard a range of options, including soup cans that students have been urged to keep at their desk, or a wrench, or a stapler. And now, hockey pucks.“Its a great idea. I applaud them for their creativity,” Gomez said of Oakland University’s initiative.David Chipman is a former ATF agent and a senior policy adviser at the gun violence prevention advocacy group Giffords, which was started by former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.He said that the Oakland University initiative “is very personal” to him because his father was a professor there for 40 years.“I talked to my dad about this and his reaction was ‘Wow, I’d be more scared that the kids would throw hockey pucks at me if I gave them a bad grade,’” Chipman said.He said that he isn’t inherently opposed to the idea of using hockey pucks as a last resort, but he said he’d rather see the focus shift to preventing of mass shootings rather than just dealing with them after they happen.“That notion of providing a distraction so that you can possibly survive a mass shooting isn’t in and of itself a stupid idea, but we’ve got to be thinking about how to prevent mass shootings, not survive them,” Chipman said. “The likelihood of a hockey puck helping you to survive a mass shooting is like nil.”Chipman said he hopes that in the new year, new state and federal legislative initiatives around guns could help prevent shootings. Those include measures to raise the minimum age at which a person can buy an assault rifle and instituting more extreme risk protection orders that let law enforcement temporarily remove firearms from individuals.“There’s a whole host of things that organized groups could be talking about that would involve preventing shootings from ever happening in the first place rather than just giving up and saying, ‘You know, they’re going to happen so how do you survive them?’” he said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgSusan Dio, chairman and president of BP America: “Frontline medical providers depend on PPE to treat patients suffering from COVID-19 and to save lives. BP is working to help deliver this equipment quickly by donating jet fuel to air carriers who will get supplies where they need to go. COVID-19 is a human crisis. People are suffering, and BP wants to help. We’re pulling together our global resources to ensure first responders, health care workers and patients know that they’re not alone.” Photo provided by BP The donation to FedEx Express, supplied by Air BP, will be used solely for international air transportation to and from the U.S. to deliver critical medical supplies, including gloves, gowns, ventilators and masks, that support the effort to fight COVID-19. Supplies will be directed by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency to communities in greatest need based on data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The fuel for Alaska Airlines will be supplied by BP’s Cherry Point Refinery and delivered to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.center_img Alaska Airlines is stepping up to restore air service to several remote Alaska communities recently cut off after local carrier Ravn Air declared bankruptcy. Working through BP Alaska and Air BP, the donated fuel will help Alaska Airlines to activate its response in support of the supply chain, delivering food, medical supplies, mail and emergency passenger services. FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享BP announced on Wednesday that the company will be donating 3 million gallons jet fuel to FedEx Express and Alaska Airlines. According to the announcement this donation is at no cost in order to support ‘the timely delivery’ of personal protective equipment (PPE) and other essential goods to areas of the U.S., and to help restore air service to several remote Alaska communities.last_img read more

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first_imgPlain Dealing sophomores Teunna Perry and Draunatika Thomas were named first team on the All-District 1-1A girls basketball team.Thomas, a center, averaged 12.0 points, 10.5 rebounds and 3.0 assists for the Lady Lions, who finished second in the district to state champion Arcadia.Perry, a guard, averaged 10.6 points, 5.5 rebounds and 3.0 assists.Senior forward Darmesha Noble and sophomore guard Hershey Stumon made the second team. Dra Briggs and Laterrica Stewart were honorable mention.Arcadia senior guard Khelsea Foster was named the MVP.Plain Dealing junior forward Keldrick Carper and freshman guard Tyjuan Thomas made the boys second team. Max Scott, Dakeldrick Oliver, Desmond Ford and Jakeleb McGee were honorable mention selections. Senior guard Travious Fielding of state champion Arcadia was named MVP. The All-District teams were selected by the district’s coaches.— Russell Hedges, [email protected] Expat InsuranceExpat Living in Hong Kong without Health Insurance?Top Expat Insurance|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Secret Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unblock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoCelebsland.com9 Celebrity Before-And-After Plastic Surgery DisastersCelebsland.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoPerfect-Dating.comAre You Ready to Meet Cool Guys in Tung Chung?Perfect-Dating.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Trick Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unlock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoAspireAbove.comRemember Abby from NCIS? Take A Deep Breath Before You See How She Looks NowAspireAbove.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndolast_img read more

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first_imgNew Delhi: The end to months of fundraising, planning and practice ended with a press release and tears. Mike DeLuca envisioned his youngest son, John, capping his baseball career the same way most 12-year-old All-Star squads from Monroeville, Pennsylvania, had for the last two decades: with a week spent playing teams from all over the country at Cooperstown Dreams Park in early August. Then the COVID-19 pandemic arrived in the United States and the shutdowns began. The sprawling complex near the Baseball Hall of Fame in central New York was no exception. Park officials announced in March they had canceled the entire 2020 summer tournament season. When Mike DeLuca told his son, the boy cried. “It’s devastating,” said DeLuca, who is also the team’s coach. “But it also is a hard lesson in life and unfortunately thousands upon thousands of 12-year-olds are learning this lesson right now. It’s still a kids’ game.They should always play like the cliche says: Play it like it’s your last game, because you never know.” No one does. Youth sports leagues and businesses all over the country are scrambling, though baseball and softball are feeling immediate effects more acutely than most. Basketball and hockey seasons are over, their tournaments called off. Soccer runs year-round in many places. Football for many seems months away.Baseball and softball had an estimated 4.5 million players between the ages of 6-12 in 2018, according to the Aspen Institute. Yet fields normally filled with the familiar “ding” of aluminum bats this time of year now sit silent ? a particular sting as winter finally gives way to the warmth of spring. “It’s like Mother Nature is mocking you,” said Lafe Hermansen, treasurer of North Shore Little League in the northern Seattle suburbs.Hermansen’s sons, ages 14 and 11, are trying to fill the void with games of catch in the yard and batting practice in the garage. It will have to do for now even as their patience is being tested while they wait until at least May 11 ? the date until which Little League International has (for now) suspended all league activities. President Donald Trump tweeted he hopes youth baseball returns “soon.” Soon enough to salvage some semblance of a season? That’s where things start to get tricky. Even if federal guidelines limiting crowd size are eased, it doesn’t mean teams will sprint to the field to play. Some leagues are already offering refunds to families wary of having their kids put back in a team setting. Others are concerned about the potential financial fallout. The cost for returning sponsors in the Capitol Hill Little League in Washington, D.C., is USD 800. Most are small businesses, many of which have been hit hard by the slowing economy. League president David Fox wonders if those businesses would be better served asking for their donations back.”That USD 800 might go to pay and, quite honestly, should go to pay people who need it rather than a logo on the back of a T-shirt,” Fox said. Which might produce a ripple effect a year from now. Capitol Hill LL needs to pay three different entities for field permits, an expensive proposition even for a league whose participation levels increased dramatically this year following the Washington Nationals’ World Series triumph. A drop in sponsorship could curtail momentum. “We couldn’t do anything else,” Fox said.”Couldn’t do tournaments. Couldn’t do any fun activities. We were actually starting a pretty robust fundraising effort. But we can’t do clinics, can’t pay beyond fields and equipment if we lose 15 percent to 20 percent of our sponsors.” The stakes are higher for Matt DeSantis, president and CEO of AC Baseball, which organizes baseball and softball tournaments in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and South Carolina. With the calendar seemingly changing by the day, DeSantis and his handful of full-time employees are scrambling to find a way to accommodate more than 1,400 teams that registered to play this spring and summer. He hopes the USD 2.2 trillion federal stimulus package helps him avoid layoffs. DeSantis is offering teams scheduled to play in May the option to find a tournament later in the summer. While a Canadian club has bailed, no one else has taken him up on it.”Nobody’s transferring. They want to play,” he said. Tournament teams represent the committed, but the heartbeat of local youth leagues are the recreational players who might not play this year ? and then never come back. “These in-house kids, you go to them next year, they’ll be, ‘Hey, you dropped us last year,'” said Gary Sifkey, a board member with Montour Youth Baseball League in the Pittsburgh suburbs. “We’ve lost them to deck hockey, we’ve lost them to video games, we’ve lost them to soccer.” Mike Glover, president of Central Perkiomen Youth Association north of Philadelphia, believes age 10 is the tipping point. “When they get to 10, 11, the kids start to have choices,? he said. “There might be the most at-risk age group.In our case, the 12 year-olds, they want to play their last season. They want to see it through.” Central Perkiomen holds a “bat ceremony” every spring to honour kids graduating out of the program. For some, it will be the end of baseball. A week in Cooperstown was supposed to serve as that rite of passage for John DeLuca and his teammates. Though the park is offering a chance to come back in the future, by next spring the Monroeville group will be teenagers, tooold and too big to play on fields designed exclusively for kids. They’re in the process of having their USD 17,000 entry fee refunded. Mike DeLuca found another tournament in South Carolina in early August. He’s holding out hope the lockdown will be over so he won’t have to disappoint his players yet again. The coach and the father has already made one rule, however. No one is allowed to talk about Cooperstown anymore. What’s the point? “We’re never getting back what we thought we were going to have,” DeLuca said. “We’re not.” For all the Latest Sports News News, Other Sports News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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