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first_imgConcerns particularly focus on councils with authority for food safety and other checks at ports. Advice contained in the government’s no-deal papers on this issue are “purely technical,” the report says.British Chancellor Philip Hammond set aside additional funds for cross-Whitehall preparations for Brexit, but it is unclear how much will go to local councils | Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images“They do not consider the training/change management needed locally nor do they consider any additional resource that might be needed,” it states.”Councils are capable to manage this change but they need new resources for new duties. Change requires training and an understanding of detail of front-line staff. Under a no deal scenario, the time and training needed for such additional capacity may not be available and ‘a period of grace’ may be needed in which any confusion between the sudden shifts in regulatory systems will result in support rather than punishment,” the report argues.Dysfunctional governmentPainting a picture of dysfunctional cross-government working on Brexit, the paper describes how the local government sector itself has had to “deal with and coordinate the work of all departments in order to understand the scale of the work needed by councils. This continues to be a concern.”“There is still an onus on the sector itself to join up the action plans of Whitehall,” it adds.The report, which was submitted for discussion at a board meeting on October 17, ahead of the government’s latest budget statement on October 29, says that the LGA is in discussion with the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government about the need for “resources or capacity which deal with these local risks and opportunities.” ‘Stark’ concernsThe LGA, which represents English and Welsh local councils in their dealings with central government, has told Whitehall that its heavily publicized no-deal “technical notices” do not cover key issues and that more advice papers are needed “to address the impact across all services at a local level,” the report adds.Councils lack clear guidance on what will happen to EU citizens in their jurisdictions in the event of no-deal, the report states.However, it concludes these are “unlikely to be delivered,” adding: “Under the no deal scenario, these issues are stark as preparedness is needed by March 2019 when a switch from EU rules to new UK rules becomes effective.”In a further complaint, the papers note that “much of the Government’s preparations on Brexit is being undertaken through confidential meetings,” a phenomenon described as “clearly unhelpful” and “hampering efforts by councils to prepare for Brexit.”Councils lack clear guidance on what will happen to EU citizens in their jurisdictions in the event of no-deal, the report states, while noting that there has been “no response” from government to concerns raised by the LGA about potential costs to local authorities — which have faced deep budget cuts in recent years — if the price of new tariffs on EU goods is passed on to them.Equally, details of how a U.K. plan to replace EU regional funding would operate in the event of no-deal is also “yet to be developed.” LONDON — Councils in England and Wales are lobbying the U.K. government for help to avoid “local economic shocks” in the event of a no-deal Brexit, according to a report prepared for the Local Government Association (LGA) board.The document, which was discussed at an October meeting of the organization’s leadership board, warns of “stark” issues facing councils and raises concerns they are being kept in the dark by Whitehall on major aspects of no-deal planning.It predicts that councils may not find out “the detail of Brexit” until “the last minute” and that preparations for “local economic shocks or emerging local opportunities [may] need to be developed quickly.” In some cases, it may already be too late for councils to train staff to cope with changes in time for a possible no-deal Brexit in March 2019, the document, which has not previously been reported, warns.center_img In the budget, Chancellor Philip Hammond set aside an additional £500 million for cross-Whitehall preparations for Brexit, but it is not yet clear how much of this will be allocated to local councils.A government spokesperson said: “We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the U.K. to strike a deal, and we remain confident we will agree a mutually advantageous deal with the EU.“However, it is the duty of a responsible government to continue to prepare for a range of potential outcomes.“We continue to work closely with local areas and meet representatives regularly. Our Brexit Ministerial Local Government Delivery Board, which the LGA are part of, is meeting regularly.” Also On POLITICO London and Brussels push for Brexit deal this week By Jacopo Barigazzi and Hans von der Burchard Labour will vote down any ‘blind Brexit’ deal, Starmer warns By Eddy Waxlast_img read more

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first_imgMen’s basketball and hockey ticket renewals on parGophers fans had to pay an additional $100, $250 or $400 donation on top of their season tickets, but that didn’t stop fans from purchasing them. Andrew KrammerJune 14, 2012Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrint Gophers fans weren’t deterred by the forced donations that accompanied men’s basketball and men’s hockey ticket sales this offseason.Despite the institution of a “preferred-seating” system — the same one football started when TCF Bank Stadium opened in 2009 — Gophers fans still ordered to renew their men’s basketball and men’s hockey tickets at high rates.Men’s basketball, which finished its season ticket renewals June 8, had a renewal rate of 85 percent, while men’s hockey had an 89 percent renewal rate.“We are happy with our overall renewal numbers,” associate athletics director Jason LaFrenz said. “It is about what we projected.”Minnesota’s athletics department announced last summer the plan to start a “Gopher Points” system, which awards ticketholders points based on the years of consecutive ticket ownership, donations and ties to the University. The new pricing structure required donations of either $400, $250 or $100, depending on the seat location.The plan drew ire from fans in blogs and public forums when it was first announced. But Gophers fans renewed their tickets at normal rates last year, and this year is similar. To counter any potential loss of business, LaFrenz said Minnesota lowered prices for single games in the upper level of Williams Arena for men’s basketball and added two new prices for cheaper seats — either $20 or $28 per game.LaFrenz and Minnesota have an uphill battle: The Gophers had the lowest average attendance last season — 11,685 — at Williams Arena since coach Tubby Smith’s arrival to the program in 2007. That’s a 12 percent drop from the 2010-11 season. “With lots of optimism on the team side and the facility enhancements, we think Gophers basketball and hockey continues to be a good value for the entertainment dollar,” LaFrenz said.In May, the University announced plans to replace the scoreboards and sound systems in both Mariucci and Williams Arenas. The University plans on making the LED scoreboards and sound systems, which cost about $8 million, installed and functional by the start of the 2012-13 season. Athletics spokesman Garry Bowman told the Minnesota Daily in May that the funding will come from the premium seating changes.“There will definitely be a ‘wow’ factor when the seasons start in the fall,” LaFrenz said.Gophers football has used a similar system since TCF Bank Stadium opened three years ago. The results have been undeniably beneficial, with more than $1 million in additional ticket revenue coming in from 2009 to 2010.Gophers football season tickets were renewed at an 89 percent rate this offseason, LaFrenz said.In April, Minnesota announced a partnership with The Aspire Group, an outside company aimed to help professional and collegiate sports sell tickets. The group began by helping the Gophers sell football season tickets in late May and in June. LaFrenz said The Aspire Group will begin selling unsold basketball season tickets in early July.last_img read more

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