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first_imgMontana is making national headlines lately, and for a very proud reason: We are one of only two states in America operating without a deficit.The state of Montana has balanced its checkbook five years in a row with no tax increases, no cuts to education or other essential services, and with $327 million in cold hard cash left in the bank. The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, FOXNews, MSNBC and CNN (among others) have all taken notice, describing our work as a national example of fiscal discipline.When people from out-of-state ask me why Montana is doing so well, I say it’s because we’re running government like a ranch. They think I’m joking when I say that. I’m not. Since ranching is what I knew before running for governor, my administration uses the same basic common-sense principles that a rancher or farmer (or for that matter, any small businessman or household) must use in order to survive. It works surprisingly well.The rules are:1. Keep some grain in the bin. A few years ago when the economy was strong, like other states we ran a surplus. We sent part of that money back to Montanans in the form of a $400 tax rebate – the largest tax relief in Montana history – and then put the remaining $250 million in the bank. That money has allowed us to get through the recession in solid shape. Contrast this to the behavior of 48 other states, not to mention the federal government. When they had extra cash, they found ways to spend it. Now they are raising taxes or borrowing money – or both.2. Live within your means. When the recession hit, I told my cabinet members to cut their agency budgets by 5 percent. Families and businesses are cutting back and the state of Montana should be no different. But we didn’t cut essential services. We looked for ways to save money by simply doing things with greater efficiency – and it worked. As a result, those agencies are now providing the same essential services to Montana citizens – whether fighting forest fires, printing hunting licenses, paving roads or imprisoning criminals – for 5 percent less than before.3. Challenge every expense, and do more with less. Where did we find these savings? It wasn’t easy. We spent five years coming up with ideas. We reviewed every single item that the state spends money on, and if we were buying something for 5 cents we tried to get it for 4. In all, we trimmed about $80 million in costs. We replaced employee travel with video-conferencing. We demanded rent reductions from our commercial landlords, or in some cases simply moved to cheaper premises. We turned down thermostats, auctioned off state vehicles, and stopped printing unnecessary items that can be viewed online, like the state phonebook or the Revenue Department tax booklet. We even had a contest in which we solicited ideas from the public, with the winner receiving a shiny new coin made of Montana palladium.And even though the state workforce was already very spare (this decade, Montana’s economy has grown 65 percent while the number of state workers has risen only 2.3 percent), we reduced it further by leaving jobs vacant if someone retired. We also froze state pay, and to set an example the lieutenant governor and I cut our salaries by $17,000.4. Don’t waste your time with people who say one thing, and do another. If someone knocks on your door this fall looking for your vote and taking credit for our solid financial shape, make sure you do your research. In the last several legislative sessions I’ve vetoed about $40 million in spending bills. And back when we set aside the surplus to prepare for an uncertain future (that safety cushion which has kept us afloat while almost all other states are drowning in red ink), Republican legislators loudly criticized me for it.Now, even their own party leaders in Washington, including Newt Gingrich and Denny Rehberg, are praising us for what we did.5. Don’t rest on your laurels. Just because we have one of the most efficient state governments in America, don’t think we aren’t still working every day to cut costs. In fact, I want your help. Go to www.governor.mt.gov and give me your own savings ideas, so that Montana can keep showing the rest of the country how it’s done.Brian Schweitzer is the Democratic governor of Montana. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

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first_imgChiccoDodiFC/iStock(LOS ANGELES) — A 14-year-old boy and 16-year-old girl are dead and three other students are injured after a classmate opened fire at a high school in Southern California Thursday morning, officials said.The 16-year-old male suspect was taken into custody and is in the hospital in “grave condition” from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, authorities said.Detectives reviewed video from the scene which showed the gunman in the quad of Saugus High School in Santa Clarita when he took a gun from his backpack, shot five people and then shot himself in the head, authorities said. The early morning school shooting was on the suspect’s birthday, authorities said.The surviving victims are a 14-year-old girl, a 15-year-old girl and a 14-year-old boy.Terrified students barricaded in classrooms before they fled the campus to search for their concerned parents, who had gathered in the streets.“I just started running,” sophomore Brooklyn Moreno said. “There was girls falling in front of me and I tried to help them up, then just kept running ’cause I didn’t want to get hurt, either.”The weapon, a .45 caliber semiautomatic pistol, was recovered with no more bullets left, authorities said.The suspect’s girlfriend and his mother are speaking with detectives, authorities said.The shooting was reported at 7:38 a.m. local time during what’s called “Zero Period,” roughly an hour before the school day officially begins at 8 a.m. and is often used for extracurricular classes, police said.When 17-year-old Hayden Trowbridge heard the gunshots, his classmates pushed their desks to the door as a barricade, he told ABC News.The teen said he grabbed his metal water bottle to use as a weapon as they all hid under their desks, crying and holding each other.Trowbridge said he had also practiced putting a book in front of his chest to protect against a fatal shot, but he didn’t have anything big enough nearby.Choir teacher Kaitlin Holt said one girl, shot in the hip and shoulder, was rushed into her classroom by other students. Holt told ABC News she gave the girl first aid and called 911.Moreno said she was in the school’s quad when she heard what she thought was a balloon popping. She took off running.“I never thought this would happen at my school,” Moreno told ABC Los Angeles station KABC. “I’m still kinda in shock right now. I’ve been shaking and crying a lot — I’m an emotional wreck.”As the search for the suspect was unfolding, officials urge those who live in the area to lock their doors and other schools were placed on lockdown.Misty Wolf, a Saugus High School graduate whose 16-year-old daughter goes to a nearby school, said they were just arriving when her daughter’s school was placed on lockdown.“We were all getting there and parents heard shots — or what we thought were shots,” Wolf told ABC News. “The nice guy who waves us in the lot every morning started shouting at the kids walking to get out of the way get up the hill. We were all trying to get out. People were confused.”“Having my kid, who is already dealing with things in life, being scared because I told her to duck down because they don’t know where the shooter is — is hard,” Wolf said. “There was another [school lockdown] a few years ago and she never wanted to leave her classroom after it. I’m worried that this will make her not want to be at school because she doesn’t feel safe.”Moments before news of the shooting broke, Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., was on the Senate floor calling on his colleagues to bring up a universal background checks bill that was passed by the House earlier this year.He asked for unanimous consent to pass the legislation dubbed the “Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019” that would establish new background check requirements for firearm transfers between private parties. The House approved of the measure in February in a 240-90 vote.His fellow Democratic Connecticut senator, Richard Blumenthal, was in the middle of his remarks on gun violence when he was handed a note informing him of the reported shooting.In August, the William S. Hart Union High School District, which includes Saugus High School, voted to extend a contract for school safety for another year for $1.05 million, local newspaper, The Santa Clarita Valley Signal, reported. Schools in the district began holding lockdown drills several years ago, a public information officer for the school district told Santa Clarita radio station KHTS in 2018 after the Parkland shooting in Florida.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgUS dispute financier Burford Capital is to acquire UK legal expenses insurer Firstassist in a £10.3m deal to create a firm offering both after-the-event (ATE) insurance and litigation funding. Burford is one of the world’s leading financiers of litigation and arbitration and listed on the London Alternative Investment Market. It was attracted to the UK market by the Jackson proposals for litigation funding. In a statement to investors, the company said the acquisition of Firstassist ‘is attractively priced and structured at a multiple that reflects the uncertainty associated with the Jackson reforms on the ATE business’. It said: ‘Through it, Burford gains the services and brand of a leading team to launch an aggressive push into third-party funding as an adjunct to, and hedge for, the ATE business. ‘The acquisition is expected to be significantly earnings-enhancing in 2012 and to produce the leading UK provider of litigation capital and insurance solutions.’ Firstassist, which has been providing ATE insurance on the UK market for more than 15 years, will continue to have its underwriting capacity provided by Great Lakes Reinsurance, a subsidiary of Munich Re. Peter Smith, managing director of Firstassist, said he expects demand to increase for third-party funding in the coming years. He added: ‘We will look to capitalise on our existing track record, wide network of relationships and transferable risk assessment skills to create a one-stop shop for litigation funding and insurance, offering significant benefits to solicitors and their clients.’ The deal, which will see Burford chairman Sir Peter Middleton become the chairman of Firstassist, is subject to FSA approval. Burford’s share price rose 3% on the news.last_img read more

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first_imgThis time last year, a much less likely win was secured at the Matchroom Stadium to help propel City clear of relegation trouble.Nowadays, ambitions are rather loftier, as Steve Cotterill’s league leaders came from behind to go ten points clear at Sky Bet League One summit.Goals from Luke Freeman, Aden Flint and Aaron Wilbraham propelled the league leaders further clear of the chasing pack after Chris Dagnall had prodded the hosts in front early on.Cotterill made one change to his side after the same XI came through back-to-back games against Doncaster Rovers and Rochdale with maximum points, as Joe Bryan reverted to left-wing back at the expense of Greg Cunningham.The manager had been wary of a repeat of City’s last visit to the Matchroom Stadium in which the team fighting against the drop upset opponents gunning for promotion.On that occasion the shoe was on the opposite foot, as Cotterill’s City struck twice in the first 12 minutes to stun the title-chasing O’s.This time around City were caught napping as Dagnall profited from a moment of hesitation from Mark Little, latching on to a pass from strike partner David Mooney to slide the ball into the bottom corner for a neatly-taken opener.But City continued their happy habit of breaching the O’s in minute 12 with a quick-fire leveller, created by the industry of the recalled Bryan.There seemed no danger as the Bristolian chased a lost cause down towards the corner flag, but he showed admirable persistence to slide in and hook the ball away from right-back Luke O’Neill, who was attempting to shepherd it out of play.Instead the ball rolled invitingly into the penalty area for Kieran Agard to collect with his back to goal and lay it off for Freeman, who struck a first-time shot from eight yards already destined for the bottom corner before it beat goalkeeper Alex Cisak via a late deflection.There had been little to report by way of non-goalscoring chances, a trend that continued until after Flint registered his seventh goal of the season with a bullet header nine minutes later.When Freeman was bundled over near the left touchline, the midfielder picked himself up to swing in a teasing cross powered high into the net by the towering City defender.The league leaders’ slack start was already a distant memory, but it was hard to see that being the end of the scoring in a wide open contest.Dagnall was close to celebrating his second of the night when his shot on the turn deflected down into the ground to deceive Fielding only to loop up and over his crossbar from close range as City breathed a collective sigh of relief.At the other end Orient looked susceptible to further damage. Having already forced ex-Liverpool left-back Andrea Dossena into a cynical foul on the halfway line, Little burst to the byeline and stood the ball up to the back post, only for Bryan and Freeman to get in each other’s way as the latter headed wide when perhaps the former would have presented the greater aerial threat.To their credit, the O’s were not afraid to commit bodies forward, dispensing with the stereotype often associated with teams managed by Italians.Veteran winger Jobi McAnuff forced Fielding to shovel a left-footed shot wide of goal before Swansea loanee Ryan Hedges volleyed a presentable loose ball into the stand behind the City goal.But Orient’s best chance to go in at the break on level terms would arrive in the third and final minute of added time when Dossena’s left-wing corner was headed over by Roman Vincelot when left unmarked only six yards from goal.If City’s second-half remit was to kill the game quickly, Cotterill’s players seemed hell-bent on carrying out the plan to the letter as they flew out of the blocks.First Marlon Pack sent Cisak stooping to his right to keep out a 25-yard daisy-cutter, before the resulting corner flashed across the face of goal with Agard just unable to react in time to convert from point-blank range.Freeman tried his luck from distance with a thunderous drive only a couple of yards wide, whilst at the other end Fielding had to be at his best to help Dossena’s brilliantly-struck shot on its way over.It was an isolated scare for the visitors following the restart, and City’s increasing superiority was rewarded on the hour mark by Wilbraham’s 16th goal of an individual season well on track to be a season’s best at the ripe old age of 35.As for the early equaliser, Bryan and Agard would share assisting duty, as the striker did well to bring a high ball under control and wait for the impending arrival of Bryan, who sent a glorious low ball across goal which tempted Cisak but proved just out of reach for the keeper before Wilbraham slid in to convert at the far post.Fielding would have to be alert to keep out substitutes Gianvito Plasmati and Jay Simpson in the closing stages, but City’s third goal had already knocked the stuffing out of a home team nervously looking over their shoulders.What a difference a year makes.last_img read more

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first_imgShare This!Maybe you’re looking to step a foot off the (extremely) well-beaten path to get away from the crowds. Maybe you have an appreciation for the under-valued (or a defiantly contrarian attitude, generally). Or maybe it isn’t your first rodeo, and you and your family need an injection of something different and fresh at the parks.Regardless of the reason, it’s time for you to enjoy the smaller, more neglected, and – let’s be honest here – less-polished offerings that Disney, Universal, and SeaWorld have to offer. It’s time to experience the Best Worst Attractions.Poseidon’s FuryPark: Islands of AdventureLocation: The Lost ContinentOpening date: May 28, 1999Let’s get all of the good stuff out of the way first: Poseidon’s Fury is a walk-through attraction (the last remaining one at either of Universal Orlando’s two parks), which provides a nice change of pace from the rip-roaring thrill rides (such as the absolutely stellar Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey) but yet still contains more energy than a standard theatrical show (like The Eighth Voyage of Sinbad stunt show, which is located right next-door). Even better, its premise holds all kinds of potential: guests join Taylor (a live actor, and not some audio-animatronic or video-projection concoction) from the Global Discovery Group as he explores the ancient Temple of Poseidon.The attraction’s theming is more than up to the task of keeping pace with the story. The design of each of the three sets guests walk through is detailed and immersive, and the queue has an almost ethereal quality to it, providing hints of long-buried secrets about to be uncovered while also maintaining a beauty that isn’t to be found in all the rest of Islands of Adventure (yes, yes – The Wizarding World of Harry Potter – Hogsmeade is gorgeous, but in an entirely different way). But neither can possibly hope to match Poseidon’s exterior – the majesty and grandeur of the dilapidated temple is simply unparalleled. It’s easy to imagine that the façade alone has enticed most of the attraction’s guests to give it a spin over the past 17 years.And then there are the special effects. Poseidon’s Fury’s grand finale, in which the titular god has an ultimate, superpowered showdown with the evil Lord Darkenon, is projected onto special rain screens – that is to say, screens made out of cascading water as opposed to pieces of fabric or plastic (the first application of this particular technology in the theme park industry, Universal is only too happy to point out) – but is punctuated by explosions of water set off by various cannons and mortars, four different types of lasers, and over 200 individual flame effects (the weapon of choice for Darkenon).Image © UniversalThe single biggest show-stopping moment, however, has nothing to do with divine battles and everything to do with water (are you surprised, given the title of the attraction?). As guests shuffle along to the final scene, they must pass through a giant water vortex – 40 feet long and 18 feet in diameter, with 40 giant nozzles shooting out water somewhere between 90 and 100 mph in order to have it arch all the way along the tunnel’s circumference, making it look as if the wall is truly made out of water. It’s a magical, dizzying display, the highlight of the attraction and easily one of the neatest sights to be had at the entire resort.Now let’s get to the bad news: despite all the well-crafted individual pieces-parts, they can’t possibly hope to add up to an overall experience that is actually any good. The walk-through nature of the attraction can leave many in the audience without a good perspective of all the action (we suppose there’s a reason why Universal has never made another one), Taylor’s acting is written to be way over the top, and the grand finale is marred by incredibly cheesy character designs (not that a name like “Lord Darkenon” demands anything less), even worse dialogue, and a final battle that plays out mostly on large screens in front of the huddled crowd instead of being stretched out all around them. Even the famed water vortex tunnel, which many diehard Universal fans claim the whole attraction is worth schlepping through exclusively for, is oftentimes plagued with technical glitches and, thus, isn’t operational a surprising portion of the time.Still, even with all of Poseidon’s struggles with quality, the attraction can still be fun and is well worth experiencing, even if once – and if one can focus all of his attention on the specific aspects that are worth singling out and concentrating upon, he will find his time well-rewarded. This is especially true given all the repeated rumors that The Lost Continent is soon to go the way of the theme park dodo, making room for a new property (perhaps Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, the Harry Potter spinoff) to help usher even more people through the front gate.(Are you a member of the small-but-incredibly-dedicated Poseidon’s Fury fan club? Please share your experiences at, and appreciation of, this attraction with all the rest of us in the comments below – your insights are more definitely welcome.)last_img read more

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first_imgLast June, a report by Gartner Inc. and the Financial Executives Research Foundation (FERF) reported a shift in the relationship between IT and business operations.  42 percent of IT organizations now report directly to the CFO, and in 45 percent of organizations, the CFO plays the lead role in determining IT investment strategy, and in 26 percent of organization, IT budget decisions are made solely by the CFO.A parallel report by Liz Herbert, principal analyst at Forrester Research,  found that SaaS and Cloud Computing makes it increasingly easy for non-IT departments to by-pass their IT staff.  On the business side, many departments now directly engage SaaS application services, without any assistance from their internal IT.  Business groups have become the “primary driver” behind the engagement of SaaS applications.  The Forrester report found that 49 percent of SaaS engagements are purchased by line-of-business VP’s and managers.Gartner predicts that this trend of moving technology decisions out of the hands of IT will only accelerate in 2012.   In 2012, 35 percent of technology expenditures will fall under the management of business units outside of IT.Daryl Plummer, managing vice president and Gartner fellow, said that “the continued trends toward consumerisation and cloud computing highlight the movement of certain former IT responsibilities into the hands of others.  As users take more control of the devices they will use, business managers are taking more control of the budgets IT organisations have watched shift over the last few years. As the world of IT moves forward, CIOs are finding that they must coordinate their activities in a much wider scope than they once controlled. While this might be a difficult prospect for IT departments, they must now adapt or be swept aside…   CIOs will see some of their current budget simply reallocated to other areas of the business. In other cases, IT projects will be redefined as business projects with line-of-business managers in control.”Increasingly, the role of IT is becoming one more of coordinator or bean counter rather than implementor.  Plummer said that “what it means is that IT has to change itself.  It has to change itself to become more of a broker of services than just a provider of technology, or even as a technology service provider. Many IT providers think of themselves as service providers to the business, when in fact, 80% of IT budgets go to just keep the lights on… Eight out of 10 dollars spent on IT is ‘dead money,’ because it goes to just keeping the lights on.”last_img read more

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first_imgThe City of Booneville, Mississippi, has passed a 2% tax on the gross sales proceeds of restaurants and the gross proceeds of hotels and motels from room rentals, effective September 1, 2017.Sales Tax Notice 72-16-12, Mississippi Department of Revenue, July 27, 2017Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img

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first_imgIn my previous posts How to Maximise CPU Performance for the Oracle Database on Linux and Testing C-State Settings and Performance with the Oracle Database on Linux I described the relation of C-States and P-States to database CPU performance on Linux.  For these I use an easy Oracle PL/SQL based test to measure performance and I have been asked if I use an equivalent T-SQL approach for SQL Server. The answer is yes so in this post I cover how to quickly verify that you are getting the maximum CPU performance for SQL Server from your system.Firstly if you are not familiar with P-States and C-States or the importance of the correct BIOS settings then the posts referenced above provide the technical details relevant to both Linux and Windows and you should be able to translate the details between the two operating systems. For example in regards to Linux I reference the Powersave, Ondemand and Performance frequency scaling governors, whereas in Windows you have the Power Saver, Balanced and High Performance Power Plans. The similarity is not coincidental and nor is the fact that the default plans are Ondemand and Balanced in Linux and Windows respectively.   Similarly for Linux I use the PowerTop utility to observe current C and P-States. In Windows if you run the command “powercfg –energy” you can observe on up to date systems an “Idle State Type of ACPI Idle (C) States” and “Performance Controls Type ACPI Performance (P)” confirming that the operating system is taking advantage of the same underlying technology.With a common background established you should be aware that the use of Turbo Boost Technology is going to play just as important a factor on Windows as it does on Linux for performance and therefore the next place to look is ark.intel.com. Find your CPU model from your system information (such as right-clicking on “This PC”) and look up the specifications, here is the example from my test system:Even though this CPU is detailed as intel ® Core ™ i7-4770K CPU @ 3.50GHz in certain circumstances this CPU can run at 3.9GHz and therefore the next step is to identify the correct utilities that can show the active frequencies whilst noting that with multiple cores the individual cores can and will be able to run a different frequencies from the cores in the same and different sockets in the same server.  Within the updated Task Manager with Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 the Turbo Boost frequency is shown, with previous and current versions of Windows the downloadable utility CPU-Z will also show actual frequencies therefore I will use this tool for measuring SQL Server performance.Moving over to SQL we want a simple T-SQL routine that will run on a single core or thread using maximum frequency to test the CPU configuration. Such a routine written in PL/SQL is described for Oracle and therefore an equivalent port of this routine to SQL Server is shown below:USE [tpcc]GOSET ANSI_NULLS ONGOCREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[CPUSIMPLE][email protected] numeric(16,6) = 0,@a DATETIME,@b [email protected] intSET @f = [email protected]=CURRENT_TIMESTAMPWHILE @f <= 10000000BEGINSET @n = @n % 999999 + sqrt(@f)SET @f = @f + 1ENDSET @b = CURRENT_TIMESTAMPPRINT 'Timing = ' + ISNULL(CAST(DATEDIFF(MS, @a, @b)AS VARCHAR),'')PRINT 'Res = ' + ISNULL(CAST(@n AS VARCHAR),'')ENDBeing close to the PL/SQL original here the routine completes in similar times to the Oracle based original on the same system and therefore also provides a first test as an indication of the potential performance gains compared to databases running on RISC based architectures.To create the procedure enter the T-SQL above in a query window specifying the database in which to create the routine (In this case [tpcc]) and click on Execute.  This creates a stored procedure called dbo.CPUSIMPLE in your database.  To run the stored procedure right click on the procedure name and select “Execute Stored Procedure …” This brings up a New Query with the following and begins to Execute.USE [tpcc]GODECLARE       @return_value intEXEC   @return_value = [dbo].[CPUSIMPLE]SELECT 'Return Value' = @return_valueGOWhen complete, if successful under Results it shows a Return Value of 0 and under Messages it shows the result and completion time, for example:Timing = 6500Res = 873729.721235(1 row(s) affected)The Result should always be the same and it is the completion time we are interested in – in this case 6.5 seconds.  This may vary slightly but only by a narrow margin.We can now modify the settings in the Power Plan (accessed under Control PanelHardware and SoundPower Options) and observe the impact on SQL Server performance when running the routine by using Tasking Manager and or CPU-Z.  By default on the test system it is running the Balanced power plan and at idle the frequency (identified under Clocks (Core #0) noting that this is only measuring the first core) is lower than the nominal frequency.  From the previous posts we can identify that under the Balanced plan this is the impact of EIST (Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology) dynamically adjusting processor voltage and frequency.  In the example below the Reference or Base Clock (BLCK) is set at 100MHz (On K series processors as with this example this can be modified however on production based systems this  will be fixed) and the multiplier has been dynamically reduced to x 8 .0 resulting in a core frequency of 800 MHz.CPU-Z reports that the multiplier can be increased dynamically to x 39.0 which not surprisingly corresponds to a core frequency of 3.9GHz (which is the Max Turbo Frequency).  The actual multiplier will depend upon the number of active cores and in this example is x 37.0 for 4 active cores, x 38.0 for 3 active cores and x 39.0 for both 2 and 1 active cores and therefore depending on the overall processor load the peak turbo frequency will adjust dynamically above the maximum non turbo ratio which is x 35.0.Given our T-SQL test running on a single core we can expect EIST to dynamically increase the multiplier and voltage (given power and temperature constraints) and as shown this increases up to the maximum Turbo Frequency of 3.9GHzThis confirms that the current BIOS and operating system settings are correctly using Turbo Boost with a result in this case as follows:Timing = 6406Res = 873729.721235(1 row(s) affected)If we set the Power Plan to High Performance then the operating system requests that the CPU runs at the maximum frequency. The impact that this has on performance depends on the Processor, BIOS and Operating system.  Even if the full Turbo Mode frequency is reported by CPU-Z, all active states above the standard rated frequency are hardware controlled and C-States will still be entered when idle.  As this processor is based on the Haswell Microarchitecture with enhanced power management features it is not surprising that the results on this system are similar to that experienced with the Balanced Power Plan.Timing = 6496Res = 873729.721235(1 row(s) affected)Nevertheless by switching between Balanced and High Performance Power Plans you can run this routine and observe the impact on performance and determine what is best for your configuration.As a further illustration in this example running the Power Saver Plan limits the processor to a maximum of 1Ghz and the stored procedure takes almost 28 seconds to complete:Timing = 27950Res = 873729.721235(1 row(s) affected)Clearly the impact on SQL Server performance is severe and therefore running in Power Saver mode is not advisable.  Instead testing between the Balanced and High Performance settings will indicate the optimal settings.  If on the other hand with this test you are not seeing the performance that you would normally expect (and typically with a modern processor this would be around 10 seconds, but could take longer depending on the CPU in question) then the next step is to troubleshoot the system BIOS settings.After maximising your single threaded configuration you can then look to maximising CPU performance for multi-threaded workloads.  Typically with a scalable database such as SQL Server running a scalable database application will mean that the SQL Server workloads benefit in the same way that Oracle does from enabling Hyper-Threading  and therefore enabling Hyper-Threading should be the default option for scalability.  When enabling Hyper-Threading especially on systems with large core counts it is important to note that Windows Server 2008 and prior supported up to 64 CPUs only. Windows Server 2008 R2, 2012 and 2012 R2 supports up to 256 processors however divides these processors up into processor groups of 64 processors with handling of processor groups improving with each release of Windows.  For example on a test system with E7-4890v2 providing 120 logical processors Windows Server 2012 R2 presents these CPUs as 2 Processor Groups of 60 logical processors each.  SQL Server is able to operate across multiple Processor Groups however it is always a prudent approach with highly scalable workloads to ensure that sessions are evenly distributed across available CPU cores to ensure maximum performance.  For example the following screen taken from the metrics monitor of HammerDB while running a SQL Server workload illustrates a desirable distribution.For further troubleshooting I find these Open Source SQL Server Scripts useful.  Primarily designed to find I/O bottlenecks they are nevertheless useful to identify other resource bottlenecks as well. If you monitor a workload and these scripts report high wait events on the resource_type  of CPU under the resource_category of Threading and CPU then  it is worth investigating your Server Properties under processors to ensure that the workload is correctly balanced. Typically an automatic setting will be optimal however testing can confirm this for you.In this post I have looked at CPU single and multi-threaded performance applying some of the knowledge from Oracle on Linux workloads to ensure that SQL Server is similarly optimized to take advantage of the available CPU resources.last_img read more

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first_imgIt’s easy to dismiss small online actions as “slacktivism” that won’t affect real change, but studies have shown that online activism can turn into fundraising results and offline action. Technology—especially the explosion of mobile and social—has made it incredibly simple for people to take small, easy actions in support of a cause. Even more amazing is the way our connected society allows us to tap into much larger networks than we would be able to build ourselves.“Slacktivists” often have large circles of influence and are more likely to spread the word, volunteer and donate down the road. According to Stanford Social Innovation Review, “For a nonprofit, this valued supporter could be the small donor—with the big network or degree of social platform savvy—who is able to influence others to give well beyond her own capacity.”If you’re still not convinced, consider this: altruism typically inspires more altruism. In one experiment, an initial act of kindness prompted others to donate, albeit in progressively smaller amounts. Yet the total dollar value donated was triple the initial gift. Generosity is contagious.So, how do you tap into the generous potential of the crowd? When it comes to turning small actions into big results, the key is to keep it simple, focus on volume, and leverage your momentum.The key word is easy.Embrace and enable slacktivists by lowering the barrier of entry to participate–especially on social media. This means making your calls to action easy to understand, easy to do, and easy to afford. Remember: these supporters will not be your high-dollar donors—yet.Turn up the volume.To get the most out of your efforts, take every opportunity to amplify your message through your newly-expanded network. Give your audience simple tools to spread your message through social media and email. Encourage sharing by making these options ubiquitous and don’t be afraid to remind your fans and followers to get the word out. Again, make it easy by giving them prepared tweets, Facebook updates, and email copy to use.Keep the momentum going.As you build up steam, use the social proof of those collective actions to rally support for your cause. Create a ticker or donation thermometer to show your progress. Encourage your supporters to leave comments that you can use as testimonials. Showing a groundswell of support for your campaign will make others take notice.Use that foot in the door.Supporters who take a small action are more likely to take additional, larger actions over time. Create a plan to cultivate these audiences specifically and encourage more involvement with your cause. Depending on how they came to your organization, these donors, petition signers, or social media warriors may need an additional introduction to your work and why it’s important.last_img read more

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