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first_imgNHDC to Prioritise Projects on North Coast UncategorizedJune 2, 2007 RelatedNHDC to Prioritise Projects on North Coast RelatedNHDC to Prioritise Projects on North Coast FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail During the 2007/08 financial year, the National Housing Development Corporation (NHDC) will seek to prioritise projects located within the North Coast tourism corridor, given the high demand for affordable shelter in this area as a result of the high investment in the construction of new hotels. This was noted by Minister of Housing, Transport, Water, and Works Robert Pickersgill during his contribution to the Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives on May 30. “We will also move to finalise agreements for the funding of selected Operation Pride Projects. The NHDC will begin implementation on seven of the 16 projects with completion confirmed for the 2007/08 financial year,” he said.The Minister informed the House that the seven projects are located in Whitehall, Deeside, Bushy Park, Frontier, Oakglades, Port Royal and Mammee Bay.”Assuming an average household size of 5 persons, some 7,600 persons are expected to benefit from the solutions projected to be completed at the end of the financial year 2007/08,” said Mr. Pickersgill.center_img RelatedNHDC to Prioritise Projects on North Coast Advertisementslast_img read more

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first_imgChange of Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Croatia Simon Thomas Mr Simon Thomas OBE has been appointed Her Majesty’s Ambassador to the Republic of Croatia in succession to Mr Andrew Dalgleish, who will be transferring to another Diplomatic Service appointment. Mr Thomas will take up his appointment during July 2021.Curriculum vitaeFull name: Simon Derek ThomasMarried to: Kristina ThomasChildren: One daughter and one sonDatesRole2020 to presentFull-time Language Training (Croatian)2019 to 2020Royal College of Defence Studies2016 to 2019Harare, Deputy Head of Mission2013 to 2015FCO, Head, Intelligence Policy Department2009 to 2013Buenos Aires, Deputy Head of Mission2006 to 2009New York, First Secretary, UK Mission to the United Nations2003 to 2005FCO, Head, Russia Section, Eastern Department2002 to 2003Cabinet Office, Desk Officer, Counter-Terrorism2002Brussels, First Secretary, UK Representation to the European Union2001New York, Second Secretary, UK Mission to the United Nations1998 to 2001Warsaw, Second Secretary1997 to 1998FCO, Desk Officer, Russia, Eastern Research Group /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Brussels, Buenos Aires, Croatia, Defence, Eastern, Europe, european, European Union, Government, Harare, New York, Russia, UK, UK Government, United Nations, Warsaw, Yorklast_img read more

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first_img Google+ WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Pinterest Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Fisheries Minister Meeting must minimise quota cuts and prepare for Brexit – Cope Twitter Twitter Google+ WhatsApp Consultation launched on proposal to limit HGV traffic in Clady center_img Previous articleDoherty seeks clarity on Tory Ferry plansNext articleMc Hugh reaffirms commitment to new Tory Ferry and Magheraroarty breakwater News Highland Homepage BannerNews DL Debate – 24/05/21 By News Highland – December 12, 2017 Pinterest Facebook Fianna Fail’s marine Spokesperson is calling on Minister Michael Creed to ensure that EU commission quota cut proposals do not succeed at this year’s council of fisheries ministers meeting.Deputy Pat the Cope Gallagher says it is essential to the fishing industry that proposed cuts for certain key stocks are reversed, with a potential loss of €33 million.He says the Irish Fishing sector is facing very uncertain times due to these cuts and the possible impacts of Brexit and is calling on Minister Creed to ensure he retains what is best for the Irish fishing industry in order for it to have a sustainable and viable future……….Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/copefishtue.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th 45 new social homes to be built in Dungloe Harps come back to win in Waterford last_img read more

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first_imgPlaytonic: “We are never using the term spiritual successor again”The Yooka-Laylee studio on avoiding the comparisons to Donkey Kong CountryChristopher DringHead of Games B2BFriday 14th June 2019Share this article Recommend Tweet SharePlaytonic wants to be clear: its new Yooka-Laylee game may look a little like Donkey Kong Country, it may sound a bit like Donkey Kong Country, and it may feature a few similar ideas, but Yooka-Laylee and The Impossible Lair is not a spiritual successor to Donkey Kong Country. You can understand the confusion. Some of the original creators of Donkey Kong Country are working on it. And Playtonic’s last game, 2017’s Yooka-Laylee, was unashamedly a spiritual successor to Banjo-Kazooie — another Rare classic from the 1990s. Playtonic’s Gavin Price”We are never saying spiritual successor again,” Playtonic studio head Gavin Price tells GamesIndustry.biz. “It worked fantastically as a marketing beat for the first game, although it had some negative things with it, as well. But we need to stand on our own two feet more. We are going to make lots of games in lots of different genres for hopefully many years to come. You’ll always be able to point back to something in the past and go ‘oh, it’s a bit like that then’. That’s always going to happen. We need to focus on what makes our games relevant and unique.””Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze’s cinematic budget is probably as much as our entire game” To be fair, there are some significant differences between Yooka-Laylee and The Impossible Lair and the series it’s not a spiritual successor to. You can tackle the final level (the titular Impossible Lair) at any time, for starters. But the biggest difference is its Zelda-style overworld, full of puzzles to solve before players can access the next 2.5D platforming level. Yet there’s also a practical reason why Price is playing down the spiritual successor tagline this time around. Whereas the first Yooka-Laylee was following a game in a genre not seen for over 15 years, the last Donkey Kong Country was released on Wii U in 2014 and updated for Switch in 2018.”Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze’s cinematic budget is probably as much as our entire game,” Price says candidly. “We are not going to win that fight. We have to find what makes our games special. It didn’t really help that there were no other 3D platformers out there when we did Yooka-Laylee, because when people do compare you to something, they end up comparing you to that little company in Kyoto. Who, you know, are not bad.”People might go, ‘This is Playtonic, so this must be the successor to Donkey Kong Country, and so we better compare this to how Tropical Freeze looks and plays.’ So we have to have something different about us and do our best to avoid those comparisons.”Don’t mention Donkey Kong CountryThe first Yooka-Laylee was an immediate Kickstarter success when it was revealed back in 2015. It was a throwback to the 3D platform games of the late 1990s with their big worlds full of collectibles, and immediately caught the imagination of those that had grown up with such games. However, this game isn’t plugging the same gap. There’s no shortage of 2D platformers on the market. And especially on Nintendo Switch.Price argues that the popularity of the genre on Nintendo’s console is a good sign. He cites that the first Yooka-Laylee was released seven months later on Switch and after Super Mario Odyssey, but very quickly caught up with the Xbox One and PS4 versions. The Impossible Lair has been created with the Switch audience in mind, and Price believes that audience is buying more games. “Nintendo has created a device that is just perfect for a time poor person,” he says. “They’ve created more opportunity for people to play video games. That’s one reason why I think Switch games are selling in such high numbers, because people have more play time and are churning through more content.”Since the game’s trailer debuted last week, the media has already dubbed the game a spin-off. The move from 3D to 2D, for some, suggests this isn’t a ‘main’ Yooka-Laylee. Is he concerned that might impact sales?”I am now. I was absolutely fine until you asked that question,” he jokes.”You know what… we don’t have mind control devices. We can’t tell people what to think. All we can say is that proof is in the pudding, give it a go. We think there’s no other platform game like it out there.”The Zelda-style overworld is the unique feature of the new Yooka-LayleeThe first Yooka-Laylee launched amid a swell of hype and expectation, driven by Kickstarter and more than two years of build-up. The Impossible Lair is due this year and Price let slip that the game is already about to enter certification. So it’s nearly ready. There’s no huge runway to launch this time. “I didn’t put too much thought into it. I hope, in future, Playtonic can be the developer that’s in a good position where we can release something with a week’s notice, but also have something we announce two years out. I don’t think there’s one template. “This time around, Debbie [Bestwick] from Team17 was adamant that this was the right way to do it.”The first Yooka-Laylee shifted over one million units and generated £2.1 million over Kickstarter, so there’s something to be said for announcing a game early. However, that title arrived to very mixed reviews and with an expectation that the indie team at Playtonic simply couldn’t meet. The game improved significantly with a patch, but that first impression still lingers. The objective for this second game is to get it out and into people’s hands, and show them that this is a step up from what came before.”It is about getting that start right,” Price says. “Hopefully there won’t be any dramas or hype that becomes out of control. We might have been a bit guilty of fuelling that hype [with Yooka-Laylee], and there were advantages to it. But this time around it’s been about getting on with it behind-the-scenes, making it a quality product, and keeping everything under our control.”In many ways, the Kickstarter was a double-edged sword for Playtonic. It launched the studio, but the firm also felt beholden to promises that hindered their ability to deliver the game they wanted.”At times, we did fear that we had made a bad Kickstarter promise, so do we U-turn on it? Honestly, you tie yourself in knots” “Not just with game features, but we also set ourselves silly tasks… we had to sign thousands of manuals,” Price remembers. “One end of the office was just rows and rows of wallpaper pasting tables filled with manuals. All of us just kept grabbing bundles of manuals and signing them. It took some of us two days.”When you do this stuff, you just look at what has been a success for other crowd-funding campaigns. And successful ones may have over-achieved what they wanted to do commercially, but they did it with hundreds or maybe a few thousand backers. We had 80,000-odd. We had promised a lot of stuff. At times, we did fear that we had made a bad promise, so do we U-turn on it? You have tonnes of people saying: ‘Just take your time. And if things change along the way, we trust you’. But then you have other people going: ‘You promised me this and this, and I own your soul’. And you’re like: ‘Well, they might do’. Honestly, you tie yourself in knots.”You know you’re decent human beings just trying to make the best game you can that lays a foundation for many years to come, and so we can support our families and maybe have an extra topping on a Dominos pizza. But, if we were to do a crowd-funding again, there would be so many things that we’d change.”The next Yooka-Laylee is out very soonThere were numerous challenges for Playtonic when making the first Yooka-Laylee. The pressure of Kickstarter, growing the team from six to 20, setting up a company, learning a middleware engine, learning how to make a multi-format game, trying to remember how 3D platformers worked…”We even had someone in Belgium try to trademark Yooka-Laylee so that we’d have to give them money,” Price remembers. “You’re fighting battles like that in between making a level. “When you look back, we’re surprised the game came out anywhere near the quality that it did.”We do learn from mistakes. [The Impossible Lair] was set-up from the start to hit really high performance targets. We have it coming out day and date across all platforms, which we couldn’t achieve last time. Everything under the hood will be technically better. And the next game we do will be better than this one.”We even had someone in Belgium try to trademark Yooka-Laylee so that we’d have to give them money” “Commercially, hopefully, we will be that bit more successful. That means we can become the type of company that takes more creative risks. I’d be happy for us to make games that make people go ‘wow, this is fantastic’, but don’t make a 5000% return. That’s ok, because we learnt something about ourselves as developers, and we built something very niche and cherished. We will always need big hits as well, but I do want us to get to that space where we can do some different, indie-focused stuff. The sort of things that you can definitely not compare to what we’ve done in the past.”Price has always dreamed big with Playtonic. Last time we spoke with him he discussed the firm’s aim to release a game or two every year. “Maybe even three games,” he says now. Yet that ambition is tapered by a nervousness, too. What we played of The Impossible Lair felt really good. But Price knows that in this industry, success is never guaranteed, no matter how good you might be. Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games “I’m always nervous,” he concludes. “It’s been two and a half years since the first Yooka-Laylee, and the landscape for gaming has changed again. There are even more games released on Steam, and now Epic has opened a store, but that doesn’t matter because everyone is just playing Fortnite anyway. Everyone is about free games. And Game Pass is a thing, and it’s taking off from what I hear. There are so many things that have happened in a short space of time. Our first game was commercially successful, and it ended up winning over a load of people… so with the second game, surely nothing can go wrong? But the market has changed so much. I’m still not sleeping.”There are so many stories of companies who had hit after hit after hit, but don’t exist today. And those that missed a few times, but went on to be really successful with a hit game. “We are very aware that you can trip over things you didn’t see coming. We’re not going to go crazy and build that office with a slide between floors. We are just going to take baby steps and keep building, try and keep a bit more under the radar and let our games speak for themselves, rather than the hype machine we had with Yooka-Laylee. Touch wood that will work out for us.”Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Publishing & Retail newsletter and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesEA leans on Apex Legends and live services in fourth quarterQ4 and full year revenues close to flat and profits take a tumble, but publisher’s bookings still up double-digitsBy Brendan Sinclair 2 hours agoUbisoft posts record sales yet again, delays Skull & Bones yet againPublisher moves away from target of 3-4 premium AAA titles a year, wants to build free-to-play “to be trending toward AAA ambitions over the long term”By Brendan Sinclair 6 hours agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

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