Month: May 2021

first_imgCHARLOTTE, N.C. – Rory McIlroy’s putter is just one tool in his toolbox. Apparently, he wants to make sure his putter understands that. After all the extra time McIlroy has spent with his putter the last two weeks, he sounded Thursday like a man who doesn’t want the shortest club in his bag developing an overly important sense of itself. “I’ve always been the type of player that I’ve never had to rely on my putting too much,” McIlroy said after posting a 3-under-par 69 to get in the early hunt at the Wells Fargo Championship. “Obviously, you putt well, you’re going to do well and contend in tournaments. “But, I feel like I’ve always been a different sort of player, where even if sometimes I don’t putt so well, I’ll still be able to get it under par, because I can hit the greens on the par 5s and two-putt those and hit a couple of iron shots close. “I never felt like I needed to rely on my putting so much.” You got that, little stick? McIlroy’s quotes came after he was asked if his struggles with his putter ever seep into the rest of his game. His answer was terrific. Wells Fargo Championship: Articles, photos and videos His answer was the hard logic of a tough competitor refusing to let a potentially damaging idea take hold. Yes, of course, putting is important, but McIlroy can beat you even if his flat stick isn’t fully cooperating. That’s what he’s telling anyone who doubts him. That’s what he’s telling himself, really. “To be honest, he hasn’t really putted that well this year,” Dave Stockton told GolfChannel.com after walking with McIlroy Wednesday in the pro-am. Stockton then went on to explain that McIlroy seems to have fixed himself. McIlroy did so without asking Stockton for help following a miserable putting effort at the Masters two weeks ago. So there you have it again. If McIlroy isn’t going to rely too much on his putter, he isn’t going to rely too much on a putting coach, either. “I think he really did figure it out on his own, and he looked good to me,” Stockton said. “I just let him go.” McIlroy entered the Wells Fargo Championship 141st in strokes gained putting. He has failed to crack the top 100 in strokes gained putting in three of his four years as a PGA Tour member. In his big year in 2012, when McIlroy won four PGA Tour titles, including the PGA Championship, he was just 82nd in strokes gained putting. At Quail Hollow on Thursday, McIlroy wasn’t bad with his putter, but he had to walk away feeling like he hit the ball well enough to go even lower. He missed a 3-footer for par at the fourth hole. He missed a 10-footer for birdie at the eighth and a 7-footer for birdie at the 12th. “It was a good start, good score,” said McIlroy, who won his first PGA Tour title here at Quail Hollow in 2010. “I probably could have squeezed a couple more out of it.” McIlroy made some good putts Thursday. He holed a 6-footer for birdie right out of the gate at No. 10. He holed a nice 7-footer for par at the 14th and a 40-footer for birdie at the 18th. He ran off five one-putts in a row closing out his first nine. “I holed some nice putts today, which was good to see,” McIlroy said. “At least it tells me the stuff I’m working on is going in the right direction.” If there’s a club McIlroy truly adores, it’s his driver. He was asked Thursday if his putter can dent his confidence in the 13 other clubs, but McIlroy’s confidence runs the other way. He believes his confidence feeds from the driver down through his bag. He believes when he’s hitting driver well, the rest of his game will fall in line. “He hits it farther than I thought, hits it really far,” said Jonas Blixt, who played with McIlroy for the first time on Thursday. “Some really big drives.” What McIlroy liked most about his round is how he manhandled the par 5s. He birdied three of the four. At Augusta National, McIlroy finished third-to-last in the field in putting, and he played the par 5s in even par for the week. “Playing the par 5s today in 3 under was much better,” McIlroy said. That bodes well for McIlroy as he seeks to claim his second PGA Tour title here.last_img read more

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first_img“A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man David KlinghofferSenior Fellow and Editor, Evolution NewsDavid Klinghoffer is a Senior Fellow at Discovery Institute and the editor of Evolution News & Science Today, the daily voice of Discovery Institute’s Center for Science & Culture, reporting on intelligent design, evolution, and the intersection of science and culture. Klinghoffer is also the author of six books, a former senior editor and literary editor at National Review magazine, and has written for the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Seattle Times, Commentary, and other publications. Born in Santa Monica, California, he graduated from Brown University in 1987 with an A.B. magna cum laude in comparative literature and religious studies. David lives near Seattle, Washington, with his wife and children.Follow DavidProfileTwitter Share Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share But as Professor Axe explains, there are major problems with this underlying assumption. For one thing, scientists have experimented extensively on the classic lab animal, the fruit fly, mutating its genes in every way they can. The mutations produce either no effect, or debilitating effects. None sets the creature out on a road to becoming a new type of animal. A more fundamental question involves the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic from bacterial cells. Even if we assume the truth of the endosymbiotic theory, that the eukaryotic cell originated from the engulfing of a smaller bacterium by a larger bacterium, first, that is not a Darwinian process, and second, while it might explain the origin of mitochondria, it leaves unexplained the origins of other organelles in the cells that make up your body, or the body of a fruit fly, or any complex organism. That is to say, if the only road open is the neo-Darwinian one, evolution “Can’t get there from here.” Only intelligent design can get around the roadblock. Enjoy a brief, accessible discussion of the conundrum by molecular biologist Doug Axe, author of Undeniable: How Biology Confirms Our Intuition That Life Is Designed, and consider enrolling for the full course. It’s an amazing resource for adult learners, homeschoolers, and anyone curious about the ultimate mystery of life, how it arose and diversified. For just one more day, you can get a 30 percent discount on the course by using the code axesubscriber30 at checkout. The discount ends Friday, April 30, at midnight! Find more information here, including an outline of the series. Recommended A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to All Evolution Evolution’s “Can’t Get There from Here” ProblemDavid KlinghofferApril 29, 2021, 12:39 PM Photo credit: Michael Rivera, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons.Neo-Darwinism faces what you could call the “Can’t get there from here” problem. Doug Axe explains in a sample lecture from his new online course, “Douglas Axe Investigates Molecular Biology and Intelligent Design.” Modern Darwinian theory assumes that all life’s wonders were arrived at by unguided genetic mutation. In other words: You CAN get there from here, via known, purely material processes.  TagsbacteriumDouglas Axeendosymbiotic theoryeukaryotic cellsgenetic mutationhomeschoolersintelligent designmolecular biologyNeo-Darwinismorganellesroadblock,Trending Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Our Debt to the Scientific Atheistslast_img read more

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first_imgMontana is making national headlines lately, and for a very proud reason: We are one of only two states in America operating without a deficit.The state of Montana has balanced its checkbook five years in a row with no tax increases, no cuts to education or other essential services, and with $327 million in cold hard cash left in the bank. The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, FOXNews, MSNBC and CNN (among others) have all taken notice, describing our work as a national example of fiscal discipline.When people from out-of-state ask me why Montana is doing so well, I say it’s because we’re running government like a ranch. They think I’m joking when I say that. I’m not. Since ranching is what I knew before running for governor, my administration uses the same basic common-sense principles that a rancher or farmer (or for that matter, any small businessman or household) must use in order to survive. It works surprisingly well.The rules are:1. Keep some grain in the bin. A few years ago when the economy was strong, like other states we ran a surplus. We sent part of that money back to Montanans in the form of a $400 tax rebate – the largest tax relief in Montana history – and then put the remaining $250 million in the bank. That money has allowed us to get through the recession in solid shape. Contrast this to the behavior of 48 other states, not to mention the federal government. When they had extra cash, they found ways to spend it. Now they are raising taxes or borrowing money – or both.2. Live within your means. When the recession hit, I told my cabinet members to cut their agency budgets by 5 percent. Families and businesses are cutting back and the state of Montana should be no different. But we didn’t cut essential services. We looked for ways to save money by simply doing things with greater efficiency – and it worked. As a result, those agencies are now providing the same essential services to Montana citizens – whether fighting forest fires, printing hunting licenses, paving roads or imprisoning criminals – for 5 percent less than before.3. Challenge every expense, and do more with less. Where did we find these savings? It wasn’t easy. We spent five years coming up with ideas. We reviewed every single item that the state spends money on, and if we were buying something for 5 cents we tried to get it for 4. In all, we trimmed about $80 million in costs. We replaced employee travel with video-conferencing. We demanded rent reductions from our commercial landlords, or in some cases simply moved to cheaper premises. We turned down thermostats, auctioned off state vehicles, and stopped printing unnecessary items that can be viewed online, like the state phonebook or the Revenue Department tax booklet. We even had a contest in which we solicited ideas from the public, with the winner receiving a shiny new coin made of Montana palladium.And even though the state workforce was already very spare (this decade, Montana’s economy has grown 65 percent while the number of state workers has risen only 2.3 percent), we reduced it further by leaving jobs vacant if someone retired. We also froze state pay, and to set an example the lieutenant governor and I cut our salaries by $17,000.4. Don’t waste your time with people who say one thing, and do another. If someone knocks on your door this fall looking for your vote and taking credit for our solid financial shape, make sure you do your research. In the last several legislative sessions I’ve vetoed about $40 million in spending bills. And back when we set aside the surplus to prepare for an uncertain future (that safety cushion which has kept us afloat while almost all other states are drowning in red ink), Republican legislators loudly criticized me for it.Now, even their own party leaders in Washington, including Newt Gingrich and Denny Rehberg, are praising us for what we did.5. Don’t rest on your laurels. Just because we have one of the most efficient state governments in America, don’t think we aren’t still working every day to cut costs. In fact, I want your help. Go to www.governor.mt.gov and give me your own savings ideas, so that Montana can keep showing the rest of the country how it’s done.Brian Schweitzer is the Democratic governor of Montana. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

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first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. GREAT FALLS – Democrat Dennis McDonald, facing an uphill battle in his bid for Congress, challenged U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg on trade with Cuba and other agriculture issues at what could be his last face-to-face battle with the incumbent with less than three weeks before the election.Rehberg, a Republican seeking a sixth term, has easily outpaced McDonald in fundraising so far this election cycle, and many view Rehberg as a clear favorite in the race.McDonald opened — and closed — the debate at the Montana Farmers Union convention by hammering Rehberg for apparently switching his stance on the embargo with Cuba that many farmers want lifted so they have another market for their product. McDonald said Rehberg started getting campaign money earlier in the decade from anti-Cuba sources.“He voted to enforce the present embargo and limit travel,” said McDonald, a Melville rancher and former chairman of the Montana Democratic Party. “It’s hurt Montanans and farmers significantly across the state.”Rehberg countered he supports lifting the agricultural trade embargo with Cuba but not the travel restriction.He shifted blame for trade issues to Democrats in charge in Washington, D.C., while also arguing much of the problem is urban legislators holding an upper hand over rural legislators of all stripes.“They just view things differently than we do in Montana,” Rehberg said.He closed the debate by saying electing McDonald won’t help.“Nancy Pelosi doesn’t need more help,” Rehberg said, noting Democrats have lowered actual spending on help to farmers and ranchers at a time when they are increasing spending elsewhere.The incumbent hammered Democratic leaders in Washington, D.C., for overspending on health care reform, stimulus spending and other issues. He said farmers are now going to be hurt because they will let the estate and other taxes expire to pay the bills.“We cannot continue down this path,” Rehberg said. “The difficulty is they need the money — much of the tax relief is going to expire, and you are going to pay more.”Rehberg said when he was young he had to sell much of the 10,000 acres of his family’s original ranch that he inherited to pay the “death tax.” He said it needs to be abolished.McDonald said the threshold on the estate tax needs to be increased so it doesn’t affect farmers and small businessman, but still taxes the super rich estates.Both candidates said they support creating a national energy policy that includes renewable energy standards and traditional sources. But Rehberg voiced stronger support for fossil fuels, including allowing drilling on the Rocky Mountain Front — while McDonald said that area needs to be protected from such development.Perennial Libertarian candidate Mike Fellows also took part in the debate, again advocating for less government spending and restrictions. Emaillast_img read more

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first_imgHealth, education, welfare … the federal government spends more than $630 billion annually on hundreds of social programs. How many of them work? No one knows. And that’s a problem.Most federal programs have never been evaluated for true effectiveness. And most evaluations that are conducted – and there are many – aren’t worth the paper they’re written on. They may examine a national program only locally, or lack a “control group” to compare against.The best way to determine whether such programs work is to conduct large-scale, multisite, experimental evaluations. These studies should use random assignment to compare results of people assigned to programs with those in similar circumstances but not assigned to the programs. The good news is that federal programs are ideally situated to accommodate such evaluations. The bad news: The federal government has conducted only 13 such evaluations since it began to study itself in the 1960s.Maybe the Feds just don’t want to be purveyors of bad news. That’s certainly what emerged from the 2010 Head Start Impact Study. A rigorous experimental evaluation, the study placed almost 5,000 children eligible for Head Start into two treatment conditions, determined by a lottery. Children who won the lottery got access to prekindergarten Head Start services; the others either didn’t attend preschool or found alternatives to Head Start.The study tracked the children’s progress through kindergarten and the first grade. Overall, the program yielded little to no positive effects. On all 41 measures of cognitive ability, Head Start failed to raise abilities of those who entered the program as 4-year-olds. Specifically, their language skills, literacy, math skills, and school performance were no better than those of the children denied access to the program.Those who entered as 3-year-olds had similar results. They scored no better than nonparticipants on 40 of the cognitive measures and significantly worse on one: Head Start grads, according to their kindergarten teachers, were significantly less well prepared in math skills.The quintessential “Great Society” program, Head Start was intended to give disadvantaged children an educational boost before starting elementary school. When enacted in 1965, its $96 million budget was intended to help kids in the summer. Early, small-bore evaluations were positive, and the program grew.Today, Head Start has a $7 billion budget and legions of invested stakeholders. But it’s not working for the kids and it’s awfully expensive. Even liberal Time magazine columnist Joe Klein, commenting on Head Start, recently wrote, “[W]e need world-class education programs, from infancy on up. But we can no longer afford to be sloppy about dispensing cash….”It’s past time for lawmakers to figure out just how well the programs Congress funds are working. As a first step, every time it authorizes or reauthorizes a social program, Congress should specifically mandate that the program undergo a rigorous experimental evaluation.This is imminently doable. When Congress creates social programs, the funded activities spread out across the nation. The stage is set for a large-scale, multisite evaluation.Unfortunately, mandating evaluations isn’t the same as getting them done. Federal agencies fearful of losing funding for pet programs are expert dawdlers when it comes to performing hard-nosed evaluations.In 1998, Congress passed the Workforce Investment Act, which authorized the Labor Department’s major job-training programs. Given the past failure of these programs, Congress stipulated that the department had to complete a large-scale, multisite evaluation of its job-training efforts by September 2005.Labor promptly procrastinated. It didn’t even award a contract for the evaluation until June 2008. According to the US Government Accountability Office, the evaluation will not be completed until June 2015 – nearly a decade past the original due date.The second step, then, is meaningful congressional oversight – and consequences. Lawmakers must be diligent in ensuring that reluctant agencies carry out any and all congressionally required program evaluations. Funding should hinge on their compliance.Congress is morally obligated to spend taxpayer dollars effectively. Experimental evaluations are the only way to determine to a high degree of certainty the effectiveness of the government’s social programs.David Muhlhausen is a research fellow in empirical policy analysis at the Heritage Foundation. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

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first_imgWork could begin on a new bike trail between Coram and West Glacier as early as next summer, according to Randy Gayner, treasurer of the Gateway to Glacier Trail. Since the nonprofit was established in 2011, the group has raised more than $85,000 toward building the seven-mile bike path along U.S. Highway 2. “We are just tickled pink that we’ve raised so much money as fast as we have,” said Gayner, who also runs Glacier Guides and Montana Raft Company.On Saturday, Sept. 21, the group is holding its first ever Pedal For Paths fundraiser. The event will feature two cycling clinics and two different bike rides – a 7-mile trek on the lower South Fork Road or a more vigorous 30-mile ride along the Hungry Horse Reservoir, including the 4-mile climb up and over the Hungry Horse Dam. Currently, a paved bike path goes 3.5 miles from Hungry Horse to Coram. It was built when U.S. Highway 2 was widened in the 1990s. Gateway to Glacier Trail President Valerie Parsons said the nonprofit group’s long-term goal is to support the construction of a trail from the Flathead Valley to Glacier National Park. The next step toward that goal is the extension of the path from Coram to West Glacier. “Right now, people ride on the shoulder and that’s pretty scary,” Parsons said. According to the group, it will cost more than $1 million to extend the trail. The project got a big financial boost in December when Flathead County awarded $871,745 from the Community Transportation Enhancement Program, which uses federal highway tax dollars to develop non-motorized transportation access for the public. In order to use the money, the nonprofit had to put up a 13.42 percent match, or about $117,000. The group has recently received large donations toward that goal, including $3,000 from the Whitefish Credit Union, $5,000 from the Plum Creek Foundation and $10,000 from the Dennis and Phyllis Washington Foundation. Gayner said with the money in hand, work would begin in 2014.“We’ll hopefully be able to break ground next summer,” he said. “We’re close to our goal, but hopefully will keep fundraising afterwards so we can get started on the other sections.”Gayner and Parsons said the eventual goal is to extend the trail on the west side too, through Bad Rock Canyon to Columbia Falls and the Flathead Valley. That may happen in the coming years when the Montana Department of Transportation rebuilds U.S. Highway 2 through the canyon.Organizers hope the event on Sept. 21 will bring another boost to the trail’s fundraising efforts. Registration for the event is $25 for adults and $15 for children, but bikers are encouraged to have a personal goal for raising additional donations. The deadline to preregister is 10 p.m. Sept. 18. Event-day registration is also available and bikers get an event T-shirt and grab bag. Festivities kick off early Saturday morning at the old Canyon Elementary School in Hungry Horse and bike rides start at 10 a.m. For more information, visit www.gatewaytoglacier.com. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

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first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. One year ago, the Kalispell Boulder Project took aim at achieving a lofty goal – to raise $100,000 for a brand new bouldering park near downtown Kalispell.This week, thanks to help from a familiar Flathead Valley philanthropist, the nonprofit organization reached its goal, and plans to break ground on the project in April.The money will be used to manufacture and install a pair of concrete climbing boulders at Lawrence Park, said Jandy Cox, manager at Rocky Mountain Outfitter in Kalispell. Cox said the fundraising efforts have been met by strong community support.Bouldering is a form of climbing that is performed without the use of ropes or harnesses. It can be done without any equipment, but many climbers use special climbing shoes to help secure footholds.Spearheaded by a group of Flathead Valley climbers and outdoor enthusiasts, the bouldering project will offer climbers and non-climbers of all abilities the opportunity to scramble up artificial rock features designed to correspond with the natural setting, Cox said.The nonprofit hopes to have the boulders installed by summer 2016.Through the Kalispell Community Foundation, the Kalispell Boulder Project established a fund last January and worked with the Kalispell Parks and Recreation Department so secure space for the bouldering features, which will be constructed at the southern end of Lawrence Park in Kalispell. After the boulders are installed, the city of Kalispell will assume responsibility for the park.Cox said the final funding boost came through a $25,000 donation from Flathead Valley philanthropist Michael Goguen.The gift effectively completes the Kalispell Boulder Project’s fundraising endeavors to raise $100,000 for the purchase, installment and landscape finishing of two synthetic climbing boulders. Project volunteers are also working with Montana Conservation Corps to break ground in April.“We are ecstatic,” Cox said. “Fundraising for KBP was a grass roots effort.”Cox said he was optimistic from the beginning that the project would be well received, but he didn’t anticipate the degree to which individuals and organizations stepped up.The Daybreak Rotary Club offered to put up a $20,000 matching grant, which gave the project an enormous boost, while local businesses also helped out.“We appreciate how the community rallied around our project and helped make our ideas a reality,” Cox said. “We could not have reached our goal without the fiscal management and administrative support of the Flathead Community Foundation; and the generosity of Kalispell Daybreak Rotary Club, local businesses, private foundations, and every individual donation from $1 to $1,000.”For more information about the Kalispell Boulder Project visit kalispellboulderproject.com. Emaillast_img read more

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first_img Email The Montana Department of Environmental Quality is accepting public comments on a wastewater discharge permit for a water-bottling plant proposed in Creston.The state agency released the draft permit Monday for the Montana Artesian Water Company’s proposed plant at 1085 Egan Slough Rd.The permit, if granted, would regulate the discharge of wastewater into an unnamed tributary of the Flathead River. The draft permit includes effluent limits and monitoring requirements to protect the receiving water quality and habitat, according to the DEQ.Lew Weaver, the owner of Montana Artesian Water Co., is seeking to pump 710 acre-feet of water annually from an underground aquifer near Egan Slough along the Flathead River, the equivalent of 1.2 billion 20-ounce water bottles.Weaver’s request, and his goal to produce 140,000 water bottles per hour, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year at a facility on his farmland, drummed up considerable attention, fueling concerns among neighbors and residents across the valley.Weaver has defended his plans, saying he followed the proper regulatory steps and studied the potential environmental consequences.As proposed, the company would discharge water from the building’s temperature control system and water used to rinse bottles before being filled. Water would be drawn from an onsite, artesian, public water supply well.The same water bottled for drinking would be used for two purposes that result in a discharge of effluent to be authorized by the proposed permit, according to the DEQ. The first would be non-contact heating water, which is an enclosed heating system. The second would be drinking water bottle rinsate, which is the water used to rinse the drinking water bottles, as a cleaning step, prior to the bottles being filled with drinking water. This rinsate water would be discharged to the receiving water via a second pipe.According to the draft permit, the discharge flow into the receiving water body is not expected to have any adverse impacts on the geology, soil quality or stability.The DEQ says the permit would include effluent limits, monitoring requirements and other conditions that would ensure the water quality standards were protected. The permitted outfalls will cause a slight increase in water quantity within the receiving water.An increase in local traffic may occur with the potential to increase dust, according to the DEQ. “However, the increase particulate matter would be short-lived and not significant,” the draft permit states. “Flathead County has approved a road approach for this project.”Seven plant species of special concern were identified by the Montana Natural Heritage Program to potentially be in the project area. This project would be located in a well-developed residential and agricultural area and it is not anticipated that any of the species of concern will be impacted by the proposed project, according to the DEQ.Effluent limits and permit conditions will ensure water quality standards for aquatic life are protected, according to the DEQ.Eleven animal species and seven plant species of special concern were identified by the Montana Natural Heritage Program to potentially be in the project area. The discharges to the unnamed tributary are proposed to be located approximately 1,300 feet from the confluence of the receiving water with the Flathead River, which is considered bull trout habitat at this location. Bull trout are protected as a threatened species.The DEQ states the permit limits would protect aquatic life in the receiving water prior to its confluence with the Flathead River and would prevent impacts to bull trout.A public hearing will be held on Monday, Aug. 1. The hearing is strictly limited to accepting and recording public comments on the draft wastewater discharge permit. DEQ officials will respond to all comments received during the public-comment period, including the public hearing, in writing at a later date. It will begin at 6 p.m. in the Creston School gymnasium at 4495 Montana Highway 35.The deadline for submitting comments is Aug. 5.The DEQ permit does not grant a water right. Instead, the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation is reviewing whether to issue a water right permit for the plant.The DNRC in May validated dozens of formal objections from farmers, property owners and other entities over the water-bottling plant, prompting an additional layer of government review and triggering a hearing around the controversial plan.The draft wastewater permit, fact sheet and environmental analysis can be reviewed on the DEQ website.Comments may be submitted at the hearing or by mail to DEQ Water Protection Bureau, PO Box 200901, Helena, MT 59620-0901 or by email to [email protected] Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

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first_img Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. For the first time in history, hundreds of young women will become Eagle Scouts with the inaugural class of females, including Gabrielle Thorsen of Bigfork and potentially three others in Montana.“As soon as Scouts opened for females, I was excited, and I signed up on the first day,” Thorsen, a 13-year-old eighth-grader at Swan River School, said. “Scouting has impacted my life in great ways with opportunities for me to learn leadership skills, community service and to work with great people.”As the Boy Scouts of America’s (BSA) highest rank, only an average of 6% of Scouts achieve the Eagle Scout status. Scouts must earn at least 21 merit badges covering topics ranging from first aid to community service projects.For Thorsen’s project, she organized volunteers to sew masks and used a 3D printer to make and donate more than 1,300 masks to essential workers locally and internationally.“After completing my Eagle Scout project, I felt like some of the masks I donated helped or saved someone that I don’t even know,” Thorsen said. “This project is and was very important and maybe even made a small difference that we don’t notice today but affected someone’s future in some way.”While BSA has offered co-ed programs for decades, it has recently expanded to welcome girls into Cub Scouts and last February began allowing girls into the Scouts BSA for youths ages 11 to 17, previously known as Boy Scouts. Thousands of young women have started joining state and nationwide to work toward the Eagle Scout rank.“We are honored to recognize these accomplished young women as the inaugural class and we are immensely proud of each Scout achieving their Eagle,” Montana Council Scout Executive Dirk Smith said. “Eagle Scouts are some of the world’s finest leaders, demonstrating strong ethics and morals and making direct and lasting impacts in their communities. We are thrilled to see these female Scouts BSA members exemplify this adventure.”The window for boards of review of the Inaugural Class of Female Eagle Scouts is from Oct. 1, 2020 to Feb. 8, 2021. All Eagle Scout credentials will be dated Feb. 8, 2021 to commemorate the milestone alongside the recognized “birthday” of the Boy Scouts of America, according to the National Council.The Montana Council aims to help young people make ethical and moral decisions over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law. For more information, visit www.montanabsa.org.The Boy Scouts of America organization is composed of more than 2.1 million youth members between the ages of 5 and 21 and approximately 800,000 volunteers in local councils throughout the United States and its territories. For more information on the Boy Scouts of America, please visit www.scouting.org.last_img read more

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first_img 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Google+ HIQA has raised concerns about Letterkenny General Hospital and has identified a number of high risks.It carried out an unannounced inspection in June and discovered poor hygiene standards in various areas.HIQA inspectors visited Letterkenny on June 18th.They found a number of areas of concern that warranted an immediate high risk finding.There was dust in many places, and some floors were not cleaned to an acceptable standard.There were also brown stains in some toilets, red stains on some patient equipment, window leaks and flaky paint.A follow up inspection found no significant improvement.Read the report hereMeanwhile Regional Health West Forum member Gerry McMonagle is calling for an investigation into the findings:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/gerry530.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter HIQA concerned about Letterkenny General Hospital identifying a number of high risks By News Highland – October 8, 2015 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Pinterest Twitter Google+ Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry center_img Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleGAA Programme – 07/10/15Next articleIrish Water will fail despite conservation grant “sweetener” – Doherty News Highland Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th WhatsApp Facebook Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Homepage BannerNews Facebook Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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