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first_imgThe Iberian nation was one of the few Europen countries to not have the quarantine lifted when the UK changed its travel advice in July. Stefan Boscia High-ranking members of the government will today discuss whether to add France to the UK’s travel quarantine list as soon as next week. Show Comments ▼ France on the verge of being added to UK quarantine list “It’s such a huge call it’s likely that they might want to wait a few more days and get some more data.” Share People wearing face masks walk along Saint-Tropez harbour on August 8, 2020, as the city made wearing a protective mask mandatory in the town center. (Photo by Valery HACHE / AFP) (Photo by VALERY HACHE/AFP via Getty Images) whatsapp People wearing face masks walk along Saint-Tropez harbour on August 8, 2020, as the city made wearing a protective mask mandatory in the town center. (Photo by Valery HACHE / AFP) (Photo by VALERY HACHE/AFP via Getty Images) Also Read: France on the verge of being added to UK quarantine list Before the Open newsletter: Start your day with the City View podcast and key market data The Times reports that the government’s Covid cabinet – chaired by Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove – will today discuss the possibility of slapping a quarantine on travellers arriving from France. The Netherlands, which has a rate of infection of 34 per 100,000, could also be in line to be added to the quarantine list. center_img People wearing face masks walk along Saint-Tropez harbour on August 8, 2020, as the city made wearing a protective mask mandatory in the town center. (Photo by Valery HACHE / AFP) (Photo by VALERY HACHE/AFP via Getty Images) Also Read: France on the verge of being added to UK quarantine list The government moved to place 14-day quarantines on travellers returning from Spain and Belgium, after they far exceeded this level. For comparison, the UK has a 17 per 100,000 rate. France has seen increasing rates of coronavirus in recent weeks, prompting speculation that it could join Belgium and Spain on the quarantine list. Wednesday 12 August 2020 11:34 am More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.com A source close to the Covid cabinet told The Times: “As we speak now France is probably just shy of crossing the line but it’s certainly right on the cusp. Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyUndoDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyUndobonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comUndoFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatterUndoDefinitionThe 20 Worst Draft Picks Ever – Ryan Leaf Doesn’t Even Crack The Top 5DefinitionUndoPost Fun25 Worst Movies Ever, According To Rotten TomatoesPost FunUndoBeach RaiderMom Belly Keeps Growing, Doctor Sees Scan And Calls CopsBeach RaiderUndoJustPerfact USAMan Decides to File for Divorce After Taking a Closer Look at This Photo!   JustPerfact USAUndoOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutUndo Recently published figures show that France had 4,854 new cases between 8 August and 10 August. whatsapp Portgual, on the other hand, may be set quarantine-free travel with the UK as cases continue to fall. France has a Covid-19 rate of infection of 29 per 100,000, which is above the level that the Joint Biosecurity Centre considers “high prevalence”.last_img read more

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first_imgBy Paul Kelly 17/04/2015 Nearly 10% of the UK working population is engaged in supply chain activity, yet the sector suffers from an acute recruitment crisis that extends way beyond truck drivers.According to Christiane Beimel, vice-president of value added services at DHL Global Forwarding: “Supply chain managers are retiring faster than they can be replaced. There simply are not enough young people to backfill the pipeline.”DHL is one of 28 industry sponsors currently supporting NOVUS, a not-for-profit initiative in higher education that was launched in 2013 to provide a strategic solution to the challenge of the growing skills gap and talent shortfall in supply chain recruitment.The brainchild of BiS-Henderson chief executive Andy Kaye, NOVUS is “seeking to inspire and recruit tomorrow’s supply chain professionals” by engaging with A-level students and undergraduates to highlight the critical role the supply chain sector plays in their lives and the career opportunities open to them.NOVUS, uniquely, helps students build their careers with a single package that provides a foundation of relevant education, training and experience, and come with a guaranteed starting graduate level supply chain job with one of the programme’s sponsors.With 120 students already enrolled and the first cohort set to graduate later this year, NOVUS remains on schedule to reach its target of 300 students within three years.Although several of the 28 sponsors have forwarding capability, only one – Uniserve – actually is a freight forwarder.Mr Kaye said: “The NOVUS scheme is all about attracting and developing the future leaders that the logistics, supply chain and freight forwarding industry needs. The students will benefit, and so will the companies in the scheme, because they will have a new pipeline of talent equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed. We hope to welcome many more forwarders to NOVUS in the future”The problem is how to raise further awareness of the scheme so that it has traction beyond the traditional confines of the sector, and it remains worrying that the best ever opportunity to raise the profile of the sector with future working generations may be lost if other forwarders don’t step up to the mark.The Chartered Institute of Logistics & Transport’s freight forwarding forum has limited capability to raise awareness of NOVUS beyond the CILT membership, while graduate schemes are outside the remit of BIFA, the sector’s trade association, which means it is unable to promote NOVUS to its freight forwarding membership.Author’s comment: As chair of Chartered Institute of Logistics & Transport’s freight forwarding forum, I believe it is imperative that awareness of the initiative spreads among the forwarding community, so that more leaders can share the vision and determination of executives such as Mr Kay, or Uniserve’s Iain Liddell, in encouraging our brightest young people to recognise forwarding as a uniquely rewarding, supply chain career choice.”last_img read more

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first_img New details have emerged about the loss of containers overboard from the ONE Apus this week that suggest it could be the largest single container loss since the sinking of the MOL Comfort in 2013.Yesterday ONE released a situation report saying 1,900 boxes or more could have been lost on Monday night when the vessel hit heavy weather in the Pacific.“The vessel was on passage from Yantian to Long Beach, approximately 1,600NM north-west of Hawaii, when it encountered a violent storm cell, producing gale-force winds and large swells which caused the ONE Apus to roll heavily, resulting in the dislodging of the lost containers.“Early investigations onboard the ONE Apus have determined that the impacted container bays remain unsafe for close-quarter inspections; however, it is estimated that the number of lost or damaged units could exceed 1,900, of which some 40 are believed to be DG [dangerous goods] containers,” the statement said.It added that the 14,000 teu vessel had abandoned its original destination and was now “proceeding in a westerly direction towards Japan with plans to seek a suitable port to right unstable containers, assess any damages and determine the exact numbers of containers lost”.The ONE Apus is deployed on THE Alliance’s FP2 North Europe-Asia-North America service, according to the eeSea liner database, along with 17 other 14,000 teu vessels from the ONE and Yang Ming fleets.According to the World Shipping Council’s (WSC) Containers Lost at Sea 2020 update, an annual average of 1,382  containers were lost at sea between 2008 and 2019.The statistics are of course skewed by catastrophic casualties, such as the 2013 sinking of the MOL Comfort that resulted in a loss of 4,293 containers; the grounding and loss of M/V Rena in 2011 that saw around 900 containers lost; and the tragic total loss of the SS El Faro in 2015 with the loss of 33 crew members and 517 containers.However, between 2017 and 2019, the industry managed to reduce the average annual loss to 779. By Gavin van Marle 02/12/2020last_img read more

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first_imgFirst OpinionWe need new antimicrobials to prevent the next infectious disease crisis Newsletters Sign up for Pharmalot Your daily update on the drug industry. Please enter a valid email address. Privacy Policy @koutterson Related: [email protected] Imagine if scientists had seen Covid-19 coming years in advance yet did little to prepare. Unthinkable, right?Yet that’s exactly what’s happening with another infectious disease crisis — the one caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria and fungi. So-called superbugs already kill more than 700,000 people each year. And the World Health Organization warns that by 2050 the annual death toll could reach 10 million if we don’t use the time to get prepared.The antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs needed to prevent such a calamity don’t yet exist — and they’re years away from patients. The problem isn’t a lack of willing scientists, but rather a broken marketplace that has made it virtually impossible for researchers to attract adequate funding.advertisement Unless lawmakers take steps to jump-start antimicrobial innovation, the world will soon find itself unprepared for a global health emergency as deadly as Covid-19. Tags antibioticsdrug developmentinfectious disease Pharma giants to unveil major $1 billion venture to push novel antibiotics center_img Leave this field empty if you’re human: The idea behind PASTEUR is similar to an idea proposed in 2016 by Jim O’Neill, the former chief economist of Goldman Sachs, when he suggested a one-time “market entry reward” of $1 billion for the development of a truly novel antimicrobial in a report on antimicrobial resistance commissioned by the British government. This idea — what economists call a pull incentive — is soon to be tested in the United Kingdom but not yet in any other G20 country.America’s pharmaceutical industry is also prepared to bridge the gap. More than 20 of our country’s leading drug companies recently helped launch the AMR Action Fund, a partnership to invest more than $1 billion in antibiotic research and development with the goal of supporting later stages clinical trials so that two to four new antibiotics would reach approval by 2030.But these companies can’t go it alone, and the antibiotics they develop won’t be available to patients unless the companies can stay in business. To ensure lifesaving antibiotics are available to us all will require cooperation from Washington. Lawmakers must act to improve the pipeline of new antimicrobial drugs — and quickly.If they don’t, the world could soon face an infectious disease crisis as formidable as Covid-19.Kevin Outterson is the founder and executive director of CARB-X and a professor at Boston University School of Law. CARB-X is a global nonprofit partnership that focuses on supporting the developers of promising new antibiotics, diagnostics, and vaccines; it is funded by BARDA, the Wellcome Trust, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. John Rex is the chief medical officer at F2G Limited, a company focused on treatments for rare fungal diseases, and the founder of AMR Solutions. Both Outterson and Rex are members of the scientific advisory board of the Partnership to Fight Infectious Disease. The opinions expressed are their own and not necessarily those of their companies or organizations. @JohnRex_NewAbx About the Authors Reprints Bacteria and fungi resistant to drugs have been around as long as the drugs themselves. When a patient takes an antimicrobial, microbes generally die. But some can survive, with the potential to become immune to existing antimicrobials.advertisement The superbug Staphylcocus epidermidis is displayed on an agar plate. WILLIAM WEST/AFP via Getty Images By Kevin Outterson and John Rex Aug. 12, 2020 Reprints John Rex In the past, scientists stayed ahead of deadly superbugs by inventing newer, more potent drugs. But innovation in antimicrobials has slowed dramatically in recent years, with higher rates of failure. In the last two decades, researchers have developed just two completely new kinds of antibiotics.This slowdown has coincided with the widespread overuse of these medicines. Roughly one-third of antibiotic prescriptions are unnecessary, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This overuse has led to an explosion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.The window for avoiding a superbug crisis that kills millions of people each year is closing quickly. Pulling back from the brink will require a two-pronged approach.First, we must encourage doctors to prescribe antibiotics as smartly and sparingly as possible so patients take these drugs only when truly necessary. We must also educate patients about what antibiotics can actually do, what they can’t do, and their limitations. That will help slow the rise of antibiotic resistance, but it won’t stop it.Second, we need a large-scale effort to create newer, more effective antimicrobials. That will require addressing the fundamentally broken market for these drugs.Medicines are incredibly expensive to develop, with median R&D costs for a single antibiotic reaching $1 billion. Pharmaceutical companies can justify such investments only if they have a fighting chance to recoup their costs. But here’s the rub: A new, advanced antibiotic is reserved for emergencies, meaning a company would sell relatively few doses of it and almost certainly lose money.That’s why pharmaceutical firms have moved away from antibiotic research in recent years. Four decades ago, there were 18 major drug companies pursuing new antibiotics. Today, there are only three.A number of smaller biotech outfits have tried to beat the odds — but failed. Last year alone, two antibiotic startups declared bankruptcy despite having brought useful new antibiotics through to FDA approval. Others have been forced to shift to other research or sell their drug for pennies on the dollar to avoid the same fate.Two reforms currently before Congress could help break this research logjam.The Developing an Innovative Strategy for Antimicrobial Resistant Microorganisms (DISARM) Act would allow Medicare to pay hospitals more for using advanced antibiotics when appropriate. This would raise the demand for more sophisticated medicines, thus giving drug makers the confidence to invest in antibiotics research.Another bill, the proposed Pioneering Antimicrobial Subscriptions to End Up Surging Resistance (PASTEUR) Act, takes a different tack. It would allow the government to pay a subscription for unlimited access to a new antimicrobial. This, in turn, would enable drug companies to recover their costs and an appropriate profit without having to sell large quantities of their drug, while ensuring that public health authorities have plenty of doses available, if needed. Kevin Outtersonlast_img read more

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first_img Facebook Twitter By John Whelan – 16th May 2019 Brought to you in association with People First Credit UnionCall for more play areasPortlaoise councillor, Pauline Madigan has called for the provision of more play areas, particularly in housing estates.The official reply from the Council is that the local authority is always willing to work with resident’s associations and developers to support the provision of play areas.Cllr Madigan said that while on the campaign trail recently she noted that the only place for the children in Maryborough Crescent to play was in the car park and this is not good enough.“The mind boggles and the heart breaks, when you see something like this,” she said, saying we have to do better.Council Chairman, John King agreed about the importance of playgrounds and play areas to communities.He said a site had been acquired for a new playground in Borris-in-Ossory and it was intended that it would go ahead later this year.Cllr James Kelly said that it was important when providing such facilities that they made provision for access-to-all, especially those with disabilities.Laois signs off on Carlow Southern Relief RoadThere is finally some small movement on long held plans for a Southern Relief Road of Carlow Town, part of which will travel through the Laois side of the town.The Southern Relief Road Scheme, comprising of a road linking the N9 (now R448) Carlow to Kilkenny Road at Mortarstown with the R725 Carlow to Tullow Road at Chapelstown was first advertised back in 2004.While a long period of time has since elapsed the Department of Transport has outlined its recognition and commitment towards this scheme, highlighting the necessary steps to be taken to progress the project to a successful conclusion.Considering the extensive process involved, the advice of the Department is for Carlow and Laois County Councils to consider the project as a whole, extending from the already constructed portion of roadway located at the junction with the R726 (Hacketsotwn Road) orbiting Carlow Town to the south, crossing the N80, the railway line, the N448, the River Barrow, the local and regional road network and joining with the already constructed portion in Co Laois.As it’s such a major development the Department have advised against ‘project splitting and as the majority of the project is located in Carlow, its local authority is best placed to administer the project.To formalise the arrangement Laois County Council has to enter a formal agreement with Carlow and that has now been recommended by Senior Engineer for Transportation, Ray Wickham and agreed by Laois councillors at their meeting on Monday.The recommendation was proposed and seconded by Cllrs Tom Mulhall and Ben Brennan and unanimously agreed by the Council this week.Pension call for CE SupervisorsLaois County Council has added its support to long running calls for the Government to make provision for pensions for Community Employment Scheme supervisors.Cllr Catherine Fitzgerald raised the issue calling on the Minister for Finance, Paschal Donohoe and the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection, Regina Doherty to implement a pension scheme for CE Supervisors.She said that the schemes provided vital services and that although awarded by the Labour Court, was well deserved but was still being ignored.Cllr Pauline Madigan support the proposal saying that the issue had dragged on for over 11 years and although the right a pension had been sanctioned by the Labour Court the CE supervisors still had a fight on their hands to get the government to agree, and this she said was all wrong.SEE ALSO – Blow for Laois footballers as forward departs panel ahead of Leinster championship RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR GAA Home Politics Local Elections Election Diary: Madigan calls for more play areas; movement on Carlow Southern… PoliticsLocal ElectionsNews Twitter TAGS2019 Local ElectionsElection Diary Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Previous articleCase made to bring a third level college to PortlaoiseNext articleLaois beef movement welcomes €100 million package following protests John WhelanJohn Whelan has been a journalist, commentator, columnist, political analyst, campaigner, politician and publisher ever since he was 17. Having been Editor of the Leinster Express, Offaly Express and the Leinster Leader he has also contributed extensively on a number of issues to all of the country’s flagship titles and programmes including the Irish Press, The Irish Independent, the Star, the Sunday Independent, the Sunday Business Post, The Sunday Times and Prime Time. He is founder of Communicate Ireland a PR, public affairs, event management and media services company.He is the author of the popular camping blog, Vanhalla – Camper Heaven. WhatsApp Election Diary: Madigan calls for more play areas; movement on Carlow Southern Relief Road; pension plan for CE Supervisors Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results GAA Pinterest GAA Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory last_img read more

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first_img Keywords Trading rules,  Alternative trading systems,  Stock exchangesCompanies International Organization of Securities Commissions As retail trading jumps, SEC to rethink its rules 123RF The International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) is launching a consultation on a range of market data issues amid growing concerns about the cost of equity market data.In a new paper, the group of global regulators examines the subject of market data access. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Regulators issue new reporting guidance on systems outages Investment firms have long complained about the rising cost of market data from exchanges and other trading venues.Firms have argued that exchanges have turned the provision of essential market data from a utility into a profit centre. As well, they argue that industry firms are a captive audience as they must acquire data to ensure they meet their best execution and other regulatory obligations.In its paper, IOSCO seeks feedback on the data that firms need to facilitate trading; the fair, equitable and timely access to market data; the cost of data; and the need for data consolidation, among other issues.“In light of the evolving nature of trading and market data needs, several jurisdictions are contemplating whether regulatory changes are necessary,” the paper noted.IOSCO said that the consultation is designed to inform the regulatory approach to market data in various jurisdictions.“Based on the analysis of the feedback received, IOSCO will consider whether any policy work is needed,” it added.IOSCO is seeking feedback on the report by Feb. 26, 2021. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media OSC seeks market structure expertise Related news James Langton last_img read more

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first_imgInflation at 30-Year Low UncategorizedMay 12, 2007 RelatedInflation at 30-Year Low Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Jamaica’s inflation rate is at a 30-year low, with the figures averaging 0.33 % for the first three months of 2007. Data from the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN), shows a rate of 0.3 % for the month of January, followed by 0.2% in February, and 0.5% in March.If the inflation rate continues at this pace for the remainder of the year, 2007 will end with an inflation rate of 4%, the lowest the island has seen in more than three decades. In fact, the last time Jamaica has experienced this level of price stability was in 1966, when more than half the current population was not even born.The current low rate of inflation follows the 5.8% registered in 2006, which is itself one of the lowest rates of inflation in the past 30 years. This follows a period of very impressive inflation numbers where, aside from 2001 and 2003, the island’s inflation rate declined each year since 1995.There are a number of factors accounting for this low level of price increases. To understand these it’s important to focus on the factors that affect Jamaica’s inflation rate.For one, being a small non-oil producing economy, Jamaica is particularly exposed to changes in the world market price of oil. The country is still vulnerable to swings in the price of the commodity; however, the dependency is significantly lower since the signing of the PetroCaribe Initiative with Venezuela in 2005.The PetroCaribe Initiative allows the country to purchase oil under a far more predictable regime. The result is that in addition to the far greater level of oil – price stability in recent years, the country is now more structurally equipped to handle price increases when they do occur.Oil-price stability aside, the island is also significantly affected by changes in the exchange rate with the U.S. dollar; with increases in the exchange rate making it more expensive to purchase imported items.For instance, an item that costs US$1.00 per pound would require J$50.00 if the exchange rate was U.S$1:J$50. If the exchange rate was to increase to US$1: J$60; the product would be more expensive to purchase with Jamaica currency, even though its price on the overseas market remained at US$1.00 per pound.What this means is that increases in the exchange rate will lead to increases in the cost of goods and services that are imported. Said differently, increases in the exchange rate lead to increases in inflation.Over the past decade, Jamaica’s exchange rate has been relatively stable; a factor which in turn has had a positive impact on the island’s inflation rate.There is another major factor that has helped to keep a lid on price increases: agricultural output. Almost 60% of the island’s inflation rate is brought about through increases in the price of food and drink. As a result, increases in the prices of food items such as vegetables, fruits, yam etc. cause the inflation rate to rise significantly.Agricultural output rose almost 16% in 2006; following a significant increase in 2005. The result of this up tick in agricultural output has been a much lower rate of increase in the prices of locally grown food items. This in turn helps to keep the inflation rate low. Agriculture industry insiders expect output in the sector to continue to rise in 2007.There are two other factors that play a huge role in keeping the inflation rate low: interest rates and the country’s import and foreign exchange policies.The government has consistently lowered interest rate over the past three years, on the back of better economic indicators such as lower inflation. This reduction in interest rates creates a virtuous cycle with the lower borrowing costs making it less expensive to purchase products on credit.Products such as furniture, motor vehicles and other “big ticket” items are either less expensive to purchase or the rate of increase in their prices is lower. The same applies to all products purchased with credit cards.However, arguably, the most important impact of the reduction in interest rates is the continuing slide in mortgage rates. With housing expenses one of the more important items in the calculation of the island’s inflation rate, the reduction in mortgage rates has had a positive impact on the current inflation rate.But probably the most important factor where the inflation rate is concerned is the very nature of the economy itself. The Jamaican economy is by far the most flexible and resilient in the Caribbean region and as such is far more able to respond to external and internal shocks such as changes in the price of oil and reductions in agricultural output through floods and droughts. The case of Trinidad and Tobago is a good illustration where Inflation in some sectors surged above 60% last year, following a period of low agricultural output. Trinidadian distributors were not able to quickly tap the international markets to import the fruits and vegetables needed. Even if they were, foreign exchange restrictions would prevent them from being able to quickly respond to what is now a national crises in Trinidad and Tobago with the government announcing in recent weeks that it will be allowing two entities to import food items to both ease the shortages that now exist in Trinidad and Tobago while lowering prices. In Jamaica, distributors would have been able to respond to market forces with far greater flexibility.With the economy better able to handle oil-price increases, the foreign exchange rate relatively stable, the cost of borrowing low and falling, the economy more responsive to changes and agricultural output continuing to rise, the inflation rate for 2007 is very likely to remain historically low.center_img RelatedInflation at 30-Year Low RelatedInflation at 30-Year Lowlast_img read more

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first_imgSupporting And Honouring Victoria’s Veterans VIC PremierThe Andrews Labor Government is improving the lives of veterans and ensuring their stories and sacrifice are remembered for future generations.The Minister for Veterans Shaun Leane today announced 29 successful projects sharing in more than $500,000 funding to support veterans and honour their service.The funding will provide crisis accommodation and welfare support for Victorian veterans among a suite of critical projects supporting those who have served our country.One of the funding recipients is Carry On Victoria, who have received $50,000 for crisis accommodation for veterans and their families.RSL Victoria have also received $50,000 to continue providing vital welfare support to veterans and their families.These projectS are possible thanks to the Labor Governments Anzac Day Proceeds Fund, which helps with direct welfare support, such as living expenses, health and wellbeing, education and school expenses, transport costs and social activities.In addition, RMIT University have received more than $18,000 to run a digital media exhibition commemorating the contributions, sacrifices and stories of Australian Army Nurses from the Boer War in 1899 to today.Diamond Creek RSL Sub-Branch also received $17,000 to buy and refurbish a shipping container, which will be used to display memorabilia and honour those who have served Australia.These commemorative projects are being made possible by the Labor Governments Victoria Remembers Grant Program, which supports projects that honour veterans and their service or educate Victorians about the significant contribution of veterans.These grant programs are being delivered in partnership with the Victorian Veterans Council.The Labor Government’s Restoring Community War Memorials Program is also providing funding to support the restoration or adaptation of Victorian community war memorials, honour rolls and avenues of honour.The latest grants include $30,000 for the Shrine of Remembrance to repair the 177 plaques in its Shrine Reserve that mark trees dedicated to events and service units, and almost $14,000 to add a new plaque and properly place another at a memorial in Nagambie, which has been abandoned for 50 years.For more information on these and other veteran grant opportunities, visit vic.gov.au/grants-support-and-commemorate-veteransAs stated by Minister for Veterans Shaun Leane“We are giving Victorian veterans the support they deserve in their civilian lives and ensuring we properly honour them for their incredible contribution to our country.”“Our veterans should be honoured every day – which is why we’re supporting veteran wellbeing and ensuring their service and sacrifice is remembered.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Andrews, AusPol, Australia, Australian, education, Exhibition, future generation, Government, Nagambie, RMIT, RMIT University, RSL, Transport, university, veterans, Victoria, wellbeinglast_img read more

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first_img Facebook Pinterest Police in Strabane say they are keen to speak to a dog walker who may have crossed paths with missing woman Marian O’Neill on Monday morning.The 55 year old was last seen near the footbridge in the Ballycolman area of Strabane shortly after 9am on Monday morning wearing a red jacket, dark trousers and white shoes.Police are appealing to anyone who was walking their dog at around 10am along the bottom of a field adjacent to the Strabane Golf Course alongside the river on Monday morning and has any information to contact them.Police say Marian would have been walking in the direction of Sion Mills and the dog walker towards Strabane. WhatsApp Twitter Google+ Previous articleMain Evening News, Sport, Farming News and Views and Obituaries Thursday January 7thNext articleASTI directs members to teach classes remotely News Highland Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Twitter Google+center_img Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Police keen to speak to dog walker as search continues for Strabane woman Homepage BannerNews Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – January 7, 2021 Facebook Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic last_img read more

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first_img Add to Google+ Print This Post By Paul Gotham on June 9, 2017No Comment Subscribe by Email Connect on Linked in By PAUL GOTHAMBINGHAMTON, N.Y. — Jeff Destefano hurled a complete game, and the Liverpool Warriors (III) defeated the Kingston Tigers (IX), in NYSPHSAA Class AA semi-final action at Gary Crooks Field on the campus of Maine-Endwell High School, Friday afternoon.Destefano worked out of a pair early-inning jams and limited Kingston to two hits through the last three innings.The senior left-hander induced an inning-ending double play to escape a bases-loaded situation in the fourth and got a double play with a pair of runners aboard in the first.Thomas Bianchi paced the Liverpool offense going 3-for-3 at the plate with a walk. The senior centerfielder doubled inside the left field line to lead the fourth inning and scored the eventual winning run on a Joe Zywicki two-out single through the middle.Jake Evans gave Liverpool a lead it did not surrender when he plated Zywicki with a two-out single in the third.Bianchi singled and scored in the sixth to give the Warriors an insurance run. Bianchi led the frame with a base hit to center. Zach Scannell dropped a sacrifice bunt. Nick Antonello moved the runner with a fly ball, and Zach Pieklik delivered with an opposite field base hit.Kingston’s Tyler Kelder started the fourth with a double to the right field corner. Fritz Genther walked, and Josh McNutt put runners on second and third with a sacrifice bunt. Garrett Warnecke walked to load the bases, and Tiger starter Jeff Hayner helped his own cause with an RBI infield single.But Destefano ended the threat with a ground ball for the pair of outs.Liverpool’s roster, as listed on MaxPreps, includes 20 players – 16 of which are seniors.Liverpool will play the winner of of Massapequa (VIII) and McQuaid (V) in Saturday’s NYSPHAA final at NYSEG Stadium. A 10 a.m. first pitch is scheduled.  BINGHAMTON, Liverpool Destefano hurls Liverpool into NYSPHAA Class AA final center_img Destefano hurls Liverpool into NYSPHAA Class AA final added by Paul Gotham on June 9, 2017View all posts by Paul Gotham →FacebookTwitter分享by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksSponsor ContentBig Data Courses | Search AdOnline Big Data Courses Might Be Better than You ThinkBig Data Courses | Search AdCosmoWomensTop 30 Most Beautiful Women in the WorldCosmoWomensLovely&HealthyTop 10 Most Dangerous Cruises In The World Lovely&Healthyby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksMore from Pickin’ SplintersBaron keeps Bonaventure close to his heart – Pickin’ SplintersTah-Jae Hill, Zion Morrison and the Starting Five – Pickin’ Splinters”If you had a Mount Rushmore of MCC baseball, he’s on there.” Longtime assistant Jack Christensen passes away – Pickin’ Splinters Follow on Facebook Leave a Reply Cancel ReplyYour email address will not be published. Share on Facebook This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.last_img read more

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