Month: December 2019

first_img Theo Walcott Theo Walcott and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain will definitely be out of action for Arsenal until after the forthcoming international break, Arsene Wenger has confirmedThe Gunners’ attacking duo both limped out of Tuesday’s Capital One Cup fourth-round loss at Sheffield Wednesday.Oxlade-Chamberlain was replaced after five minutes due to a hamstring problem and, Walcott, who came on in his place, went off after 19 minutes with a calf problem.Wenger is still waiting for scans to determine the full extent of the injuries, but neither will return to action until after November’s international break.That means they will miss Saturday’s Premier League clash at Swansea, next Wednesday’s Champions League trip to Bayern Munich and the subsequent north London derby with Tottenham.The Frenchman said on Thursday: “Nothing has changed since after the game. They are out but the scans are today – it’s 48 hours afterwards.“We hope they are light injuries, but they are out until after the international break.”Arsenal, who are second in the Premier League, play at Swansea on Saturday before 1last_img read more

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first_imgA return to Real Madrid is a very real possibility for Jose Mourinho if he is sacked by Chelsea, former club president Ramon Calderon has told talkSPORT.The Portuguese coach is feeling the heat in the Stamford Bridge hotseat, with the defending Premier League champions currently 16th in the table after suffering seven defeats in their opening 12 games.It has been reported that Blues owner Roman Abramovich is prepared to be patient with Mourinho and will give him time to turn their season around, but that hasn’t stopped suggestions that he could be axed if results don’t improve soon.And, if he is given the boot by Chelsea, Calderon insists “you can’t rule out” seeing ‘the Special One’ in the Bernabeu home dug out again.Mourinho left Real in 2013 following a tumultuous three-season spell which saw the world’s most expensive side claim just one La Liga title and one Copa del Rey triumph, while his exit was marred by reports he had fallen out with a number of the club’s key stars.Yet, according to Calderon, current president Florentino Perez remains a big fan of the coach and would not hesitate to bring Mourinho back to the club in place of current manager Rafa Benitez.Speaking on the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast, the ex-Los Blancos chief said: “It’s not a secret that the current Real Madrid president has backed Mourinho many times.“He likes him a lot and you can’t rule out seeing him again on the bench at the Bernabeu.“I know it seems strange, but if Benitez doesn’t have a good season and Mourinho gets sacked by Chelsea, I insist you can’t rule out seeing him here again.“I know that the president tried to have him here instead of Benitez, but Mourinho said he didn’t want it and that it wasn’t the right time to come back.“But after two or three years I can see him here again. It happened the same with Chelsea, they sacked him but then he came back. In football that is normal.“The current president has a lot of interest in Mourinho, he backed him a lot during his time at Madrid and Mourinho is his favourite coach.”last_img read more

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first_img Alvaro Morata Arsenal and Tottenham have expressed an interest in snapping up Juventus star Alvaro Morata before the transfer window closes this month.The striker has struggled to hit the heights of last season after finding his spot in the team under threat by summer signing Paulo Dybala.The Spaniard found the net 15 times last term but he has struck just three times during the current campaign.And now, according to reports in Italy, both Arsenal and Tottenham have made enquiries about Morata’s availability.The Premier League duo believe the striker could be lured away from Turin this month as he looks to find his form ahead of Euro 2016 this summer.Interest in Morata is incredibly high and both Leicester and Sunderland also hold a feint interest in striking a deal. 1last_img read more

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first_imgChelsea caretaker boss Guus Hiddink says the Premier League should help clubs playing in the Champions League and Europa League by planning fixtures accordingly.The European competitions return next week, with the Blues travelling to PSG on Tuesday night in the last 16 first leg before the home FA Cup fifth-round tie with Manchester City on the Sunday.The game will be televised live on Sunday, February 21, despite City expressing a preference for the Saturday.Quadruple-chasing City feel they are being penalised for their success with unnecessary fixture congestion during a critical 11-day spell in their campaign.The tie will take place the day before Pellegrini’s squad travel to Ukraine ahead of their Champions League game against Dynamo Kiev on February 24.That in turn comes just four days before the League Cup final against Liverpool at Wembley, and City then face the Reds again at Anfield in the Barclays Premier League three days after that.The club was said to be furious and boss Manuel Pellegrini has threatened to field a weakened team, with Hiddink admitting his sympathy for Pellegrini.“The Premier League must give the teams who are representing England in Europe a good schedule,” the Chelsea boss said.“The commercial broadcaster must also think about giving the teams involved the chance to play, for instance, when they have to play on Tuesday, play games if possible on Friday.“One day’s rest in this tough league is vital for the teams playing in Europe.” 1 Guus Hiddink last_img read more

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first_img1 Has Riyad Mahrez got the Player of the Season sewn up already?The Leicester attacker was on hand again to help his team out at Watford and scored to send them five points clear at the top of the Premier League.It was goal no.15 in the league and he has also created 11 for his team-mates. However, he has not been the only consistent performer this season.Tell us who you think should get the nod by voting below.VIDEO: 15 FOOTBALLERS TOO GOOD FOR THEIR CURRENT CLUB – AGREE? Has there been a better player than Riyad Mahrez? Vote below last_img read more

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first_imgHORSE RACING: Beloved gelding is put down at 32 after fighting illness. He raced until age 9, winning 39 times. By Kevin Modesti STAFF WRITER John Henry died at age 32 on Monday, but not before the legendary gelding put up a fight against illness that recalled his tenacity on the racetrack. “He stayed around longer than most (great thoroughbreds),” McAnally said. “What he did for racing at the age of 9 was incredible.” McAnally said he saw John Henry for the last time in September, when the trainer was in Kentucky for a horse auction. “He wasn’t doing well,” McAnally said. “I knew it was just a matter of time.” Reports made it sound as if John Henry could go at any time as he fought dehydration in the heat of mid-September. Horse Park staffers were said to have drawn an outline of his would-be grave on a patch of grass near his barn. When John Henry rallied, it surprised nobody who’d seen him race. Caretakers joked that their ornery patient wanted to defy predictions one last time. Horse Park spokeswoman Lisa Jackson said Monday that keeping John Henry alive any longer “wouldn’t have been fair to the horse.” “The next step would have been so hard on him,” Jackson told the Associated Press. “It wouldn’t have been comfortable.” John Henry’s career is barely summed up in his huge career numbers: 83 starts from 1977-84; 39 victories, including 16 in Grade 1 stakes on both dirt and turf; and $6,591,860 in earnings, a record that since has been eclipsed but remains the all-time best if adjusted for inflation. His local wins included the 1981 and 1982 Santa Anita Handicaps, the latter after Perrault was disqualified for interference. Perhaps his most famous win came in the 1981 Arlington Million, where he caught The Bart in a finish so close that the network televising the race ended its broadcast having said The Bart held on. It’s the way John Henry went from the scrap heap to the top that made him an icon of the last decade before various forms of off-track betting loosened the emotional tie between horses and their fans. A 1975 offspring of Old Bob Bowers and Once Double, John Henry wasn’t well-bred and lacked a champion’s physique and personality. His name, evoking the fabled “steel-drivin’ man,” came from an early talent for stomping feed buckets flat. He was gelded in an attempt to soften his disposition. John Henry had lost 10 races in a row when Sam and Dorothy Rubin bought him for $25,000 in 1978. Asked why he spent so much on a sub-stakes-level horse who had no breeding value because he was a gelding, Sam Rubin, a bicycle importer with little racing knowledge, famously replied: “Why? What color is a gelding?” Under the Rubins’ ownership, John Henry often switched circuits and trainers before having his best success in Southern California with McAnally. Among the jockeys he carried to stakes victories were Hall of Famers Bill Shoemaker, Laffit Pincay, Chris McCarron and Angel Cordero. John Henry’s last race – and last victory – came with McCarron in the October 1984 Ballantine Handicap on the Meadowlands turf course in New Jersey. An ankle condition kept him out of the inaugural Breeders’ Cup at Hollywood Park that fall and forced his retirement. In a statement released through the Horse Park on Monday, McCarron said: “John meant the world to my family and me. Everywhere he raced, his presence doubled the size of a normal racetrack crowd. He did so much for racing, even after he retired, that he will be impossible to replace.” heymodesti@aol.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CityJohn Henry was euthanized in Lexington, Ky., at the Kentucky Horse Park, where his stall in the Hall of Champions had been a tourist destination for racing fans throughout a 22-year retirement. A park spokeswoman said the two-time Horse of the Year declined over the weekend, and his kidneys failed. Park officials said they were planning a public memorial service. News of John Henry’s death hit hardest in California, where the refugee from the New York claiming ranks made the rags-to-riches climb of a modern Seabiscuit, winning the national Horse of the Year title in 1981 and again in 1984 at age 9 to become the sport’s oldest-ever champion. “It was a great run,” said Ron McAnally, John Henry’s trainer during the years of dominance that propelled both the horse and the horseman to the racing Hall of Fame. “He was a great part of our lives, both when he was racing and in retirement. “He meant a lot to racing people across the country.” McAnally, who heard of John Henry’s death in a phone call from the Horse Park to his Pasadena home on Monday, linked the horse’s popularity to the length of his career. last_img read more

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first_imgHe said it has nothing to do with the resignation last week of David Miranda from the Civil Service Commission, which handles personnel matters with city employees. Miranda, 43, a nephew of Councilwoman Rosie Vasquez, was sentenced last month to four years’ probation for his fourth drunken- driving conviction. Miranda, who could not be reached for comment, was appointed in March 2005. He also resigned last week from his job at the Montebello Unified School District. The terms of his probation include having his driver license suspended for two years, serving 15 days in county jail, and serving 18 months in an alcohol rehabilitation program. “It is purely a political agenda and witch hunt,” said Chavarria Halpern, spokesperson for Montebello Citizens for Honest Government and Miranda’s mother. She said he has been targeted for his involvement with her group’s recall effort of three council members for their part in exploring the county taking over the city’s fire services. Only Councilman Jeff Siccama will face recall Dec. 18. Councilman Bill Molinari said he was unaware of Miranda’s criminal cases. He was disturbed, however, why the resolution did not pertain to city employees and elected officials. “I have several concerns,” he said. “It should include everyone.” Narramore said the resolution was only the first step in reviewing and updating the city’s policy on background checks. Vasquez, who declined to comment about her nephew, said elected officials should be subject to the background checks. “We set the examples,” she said. Resident Catherine Torres questioned why this type of policy was not already on the books. Molinari concurred and said he was embarrassed that it wasn’t already in place. Vasquez said the protocol must be established, especially for employees in the Parks and Recreation Department since they come in contact with children. The resolution states that a commissioner cannot serve if he or she has been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor, unless it is not related to the position and poses no threat or risk to the city or to the public. The list of offenses includes, but is not limited to robbery, embezzlement, kidnapping, homicide, receiving stolen property, drugs or narcotics, intoxication, fraud, manslaughter, theft, forgery, assault, bribery and domestic violence. Narramore said he expects a policy concerning elected officials to come before the council at its next meeting. sandra.molina@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3028 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! MONTEBELLO – The City Council recently approved the first step in its evaluation of the city’s background-check policy for employees, commissioners and elected officials. The resolution, which passed unanimously, authorizes the city administrator and/or personnel director access to the criminal history for candidates for the city’s commissions. They are the arts and culture, civil service, golf course, parks and recreation, planning, traffic and safety, and youth commissions. “The city’s policies are not up to date,” said interim City Administrator Randy Narramore. last_img read more

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first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.“He was convicted of three murders and four attempts, and he was convicted of shooting personally in four different shootings over a four-year period,” Deputy District Attorney Hoon Chun said. “We will definitely be asking for the death sentence.” Meanwhile, the verdicts came as welcome and surprising news in Atwater Village, where residents said they feared McGhee would get off after an almost six-year wait for the cases to come to trial – and nearly two weeks of deliberations. “Everyone here was saying to each other, `He’s getting out! He’s getting out!” said Lenore Solis, treasurer of the Atwater Village Neighborhood Council and a long-time resident. Since McGhee’s capture in 2003 in Arizona, crime has declined in the area, residents and police say. The arrest came only after City Councilman Eric Garcetti posted a $50,000 reward and a U.S. Marshal’s Service nationwide hunt. “Let’s face it, he was responsible for a lot of the killings and the violence,” Solis said. “His mother was going around passing out leaflets asking for people to pray for her son and to get support for him. I feel for her, but I also feel for all the mothers of his victims. This is all a sad commentary on our society.” The lengthy deliberations – today marked the ninth day – were due in part to issues with a lone juror Perry removed from the panel a week ago and replaced with an alternate. Jurors were also having to weigh the testimony of prosecution witnesses – some of them gang members with pending cases of their own – that defense attorney H. Clay Jacke Jr. said were motivated by plea deals from prosecutors. The murder convictions were for the Oct. 14, 1997, killing of Ronald Martin; the June 3, 2000, slaying of 16-year-old Ryan Gonzalez; and the Nov. 9, 2001, slaying of Margie Mendoza, the girlfriend of a rival gang member and a 26-year-old mother of three. McGhee is believed to have killed another one in 2000, simply because he thought Atwater Village wasn’t big enough for two people with the same nickname, “Guero” – “light-skinned” in Spanish. In addition to his conviction of attempting to murder LAPD officers Thomas Baker and Carlos Langarica, McGhee was found guilty of trying to kill Duane Natividad and Erica Rhee. He was acquitted of attempting to kill Pedro Sanchez and Juan Cardiel. Three of McGhee’s fellow Toonerville gang members – Mario “Little Boy” Aleman, Ramon “Chubbs” Maldonado and Joseph “Little Respect” Aghazadeh – were previously convicted and sentenced to two consecutive life terms in the July 4, 2000, attempted murders of Baker and Langarica during a chase. The prosecution did run into challenges in trying to get certain witnesses to testify accurately, including Cardiel and Sanchez, who said they couldn’t remember who shot them. Chun said it was indicative of the wave of fear and intimidation exerted by McGhee even after his capture. McGhee allegedly killed witnesses and bragged about it in his autobiography. “Witness protection won’t work/ Realize your ratt ain’t going to make it to the stand/ To identifie\ the man shootin up the ham/ Can’t promise protection when you can’t protect yourself,” he wrote in one set of lyrics introduced in his trial. Details in McGhee’s rap lyrics, according to authorities, corresponded to details in no fewer than three of the killings to which McGhee has been connected. Despite his Irish surname, McGhee is part Latino who went by the street handles “Huero” and “Eskimo.” At trial, he appeared each day looking clean-cut and dressed in a business suit. But prosecutors showed the jury photos of his tattoo-covered torso and arms and an eagle eating a snake – symbolic of the Mexican flag – emblazoned on the back of his once-shaven head. Police say McGhee lorded with an iron fist over the Toonerville gang, which had members in Atwater Village, Los Feliz, Glendale and Sunland-Tujunga. He reportedly even ran the gang like a paramilitary organization, talking tactics on eluding police, taking target practice and having gang members posted as lookouts on their turf. Ultimately, though, a large part of McGhee’s undoing in the courtroom were his own words, scribbled in longhand in a notebook of lyrics authorities found when they captured him. His defense team had argued the notebook should not be admitted into evidence because it contained the notation in big letter that “Everything in this book is a work of fiction.” But Chun successfully countered that McGhee’s “autobiographical gang writings in the notebook are self-authenticating because they consistently identify the author as having characteristics unique to Defendant McGee” – the tattoos, the nicknames, his gang affiliations, his Atwater roots, his physical description and being a fugitive from murder charges. “They are his words,” Chun said. “They are his deeds.” For the latest news and observations on crime in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, check out the Daily News’ crime blog by clicking here.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! One of Los Angeles’ most feared gang leaders with a penchant for writing rap lyrics about his killings was convicted today of murdering rival gang members for control of a lucrative drug trade – and now could face the death penalty. Timothy Joseph McGhee, 34, leader of the Toonerville gang in Atwater Village, was found guilty of three counts of first-degree murder and four of attempted murder. His autobiographical notebook of gang lyrics in which he boasted about his crimes proved vital in the conviction. McGhee showed no emotion in Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert J. Perry’s courtroom when the verdicts were read. His mother appeared distraught when she learned the outcome and declined comment. Perry immediately set penalty-phase arguments and testimony to begin this morning. last_img

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first_imgSYLMAR – Robbie Marie Jones walked proudly across the stage at North Valley Charter Academy on the last day of school this past June. At one time barely passing her classes, Robbie had turned her life around after being diagnosed with a learning disability. Eventually excelling at the Granada Hills school, Robbie eagerly talked about going to college to become a nurse. It was a dream the girl once sent to a boot camp for troubled youths never thought possible. Now, filled with a renewed outlook, the summer was to be a time for fun. A week after graduation, Robbie begged her mom to let her go to a sleepover with a friend in Pacoima. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre Her mom, Ann Marie, reluctantly agreed. It was the worst decision she ever made. That June 24 night, Ann Marie would find Robbie slumped in the driveway of her friend’s Sproule Avenue house – bleeding from a wound caused by a .38-caliber bullet intended for someone else. Doctors doubted she would live three hours. But today the girl who hospital workers dubbed the “Miracle Baby” of Holy Cross is rebuilding her life once again. Relearning little things It’s been a slow, frustrating and painful process for Robbie since the shooting. Brain-damaged and robbed of communication, the 16-year-old struggles to relearn how to do many of the everyday things most people take for granted. “At first, I didn’t want to come back …,” Robbie said recently at her Sylmar home, tears welling in her eyes. “I just wanted to die. … It’s better now, but I just wish I knew how to say stuff again.” As she stood in her bedroom – deflated “Get Well Soon” balloons pinned to the walls – Robbie struggled for nearly 30 seconds to figure out how to say her age. “Five … 10 … 15 … and then … 15? Or no … 16 … there we go,” she said, finally hitting the right number. The wisecracking teen who once enjoyed teasing friends and building a MySpace page now has a tough time carrying on a conversation and can’t remember her MySpace password. Something as simple as talking about what she’s doing the next day can be exhausting. She frequently has to have her mother check to see whether she is saying the right words. “Tomorrow is … ,” Robbie said. “Today’s Thursday,” her mother said. “Friday,” Robbie said. Then she asked: “What are we doing again? What is it called?” “Therapy,” her mother said. “Yeah, there you go. I like that a lot.” Struggling to keep up Robbie’s life has been a roller coaster from the beginning. Already the proud parents of a son, Ann Marie and Walter Jones wanted a baby girl. And in 1990, they adopted Robbie a week after she was born Dec. 5. “She ended up looking so much like us,” her mother said. “She looked like she belonged to us.” As a toddler, Robbie was headstrong. One day while sitting in the den, Ann Marie noticed her daughter march by carrying some of her mother’s clothes. When her mother asked where she was going with the clothes, she said Robbie retorted, “You always throw my clothes out without asking.” From kindergarten through third grade, Robbie did well in her classes. But by the fourth and fifth grades, she began to struggle to keep up. She had a hard time focusing. She didn’t listen. She fell behind. Sensing something was wrong, her mother had Robbie’s hearing tested. When that turned out fine, Ann Marie thought Robbie might have a behavioral problem. So for a month in early 2004, Ann Marie sent Robbie to Angels Gate, a well-known boot camp for at-risk youth in San Luis Obispo. Still, when Robbie returned, nothing had changed. Unsure where to turn or what to do, Ann Marie said she was driving past Imagine Academy in Granada Hills one day when it struck her. The public charter school promotes academic excellence, leadership and personal growth. It also has a small student-to-teacher ratio. “I knew that was exactly what she needed,” her mother said. Still, Robbie struggled. She barely passed with C’s and D’s. Cleveland High School was the next stop. She got more C’s and D’s. She even failed gym class. It was back to Imagine, which had changed its name to North Valley Charter Academy. “She wasn’t living up to her potential,” her mom said. “I knew this wasn’t my Robbie I was seeing.” Last year, a doctor diagnosed Robbie with Central Auditory Processing Disorder and put her on Adderall to treat attention deficit disorder. Suddenly, Robbie’s grades improved. She went from failing Spanish to getting an A+. She passed the high school exit exam and took the SATs. At her school-year-ending ceremony, Robbie was awarded most improved in Spanish and English – the first academic honors she had ever received. “It was one of her most proud moments of her life,” said Diane French, principal of the school with the slogan, “Just my best – nothing less.” Fighting to survive It was eight days later when Robbie went to a sleepover at a classmate’s home in Pacoima. Robbie loved animals, and about 10:40p.m., she was walking toward the garage to play with her friend’s pit bull puppies. At the same time, the friend’s cousin – Robert Scarbrough, 38, who had a history of arrests for selling marijuana – was walking up the driveway. Three or four men confronted him and asked for drugs, police said. It was dark, and Robbie didn’t see Scarbrough at the foot of the driveway, where cars blocked her view. When Scarbrough told the men he had no dope, one of them pulled a gun. There was a struggle, and the revolver went off. Scarbrough was hit. He fell. The gunman fired more shots at Scarbrough while he was on the ground. Then the gunman and the others, described only as black males wearing dark clothes, disappeared down the street, police said. Scarbrough was hit in the face and groin – and survived. But during the shooting, an errant bullet blew through his hand and flew up the driveway, hitting Robbie in the head. “She went to the wrong place. She went to the wrong house,” Los Angeles Police Detective Heather Gahry said, noting the case remains unsolved. “For her, I’m working on this case. She’s the real victim here.” Scarbrough could not be reached for comment. The family at the house where the shooting occurred wouldn’t comment. But Ann Marie vividly recalls when she got the call that her daughter had been shot. She grabbed her husband and rushed to the house. Within minutes, they arrived to find police tape surrounding the site. Walter ducked under the tape and saw his daughter lying in a heap in the driveway. “I didn’t know if she was dead. She was in the middle of the driveway, lying there,” said Walter, 60. “I didn’t see any movement. My heart just leaped out of my chest.” The mother of Robbie’s friend told Walter that Robbie was still breathing. It seemed like forever before the ambulance arrived. On the way to Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in Mission Hills, Dad and Mom tried to stay hopeful. “I was brokenhearted because my child was suffering,” Walter said. “But I was elated because she was alive. “I felt that if she was alive, we could keep her alive.” Taking care of little girl At Holy Cross, doctors hooked Robbie to a respirator, doubtful she would live very long. “When I took her into the operating room … I said she’s not going to make it, when her mother said she was going to make it,” Dr. Rafael Quino ez recalled. “I must admit that I didn’t believe her in the first place. But now I do.” The bullet entered the left side of Robbie’s head and pierced the tissue in her left temple. In the operating room the next day, Quino ez cleaned the wound and removed bullet fragments and other debris. Then, to reduce the swelling of Robbie’s brain, the medical team removed a 4-inch section of her skull. To preserve it to be reattached later, they inserted it into her abdomen. Three weeks later, the swelling had gone down, and doctors replaced the piece of skull. When her parents were finally allowed to see her, Robbie was virtually unrecognizable, her face swollen and black and blue, tubes tangling around her. “I cried,” Walter said. “I felt so sorry for her. I felt so very sorry for her. She was suffering. “My job was to take care of her. I told her to just keep breathing, breathe deep. She’s gonna be all right. “She kept breathing. Daddy and Mommy are there. We’ll take care of you.” Throughout the ordeal – the six surgeries, the tense moments – her mom and dad never gave up hope. “She’s not going to die. She’s just not going to,” they repeated like a mantra. After 60 days in the hospital, Robbie – the “Miracle Baby” of Holy Cross – walked out, assisted by friends. It was Aug. 22. Putting life back together Today, the girl who almost died continues to learn how to speak and move and put her life back together. In hourlong sessions three days a week, she attends physical, occupational and speech therapy. A tutor visits Robbie three times a week, working with her on reading, writing, geography and math. She’ll get individual attention until February – until her parents can get her back into school and into a special-education program. Her mother remains strong, shuttling her beloved daughter to all her appointments, keeping detailed notes on a calendar at home. But she still recalls that June day when she told Robbie she could go to her friend’s for a sleepover. “If I had said, `No, you can’t spend the night,’ this wouldn’t have happened,” she said. “They were a week out of school. I knew that Robbie wanted to celebrate because there was no school tomorrow.” When frustrations and concerns creep in about Robbie’s recovery, Ann Marie takes solace in the progress her daughter has already made. “At this point, we don’t know how much of this is going to straighten itself out,” she said. But Robbie “sees herself coming back and is pushing real hard to do it,” Ann Marie said. Robbie sometimes will ask her therapist if she can stay longer to get extra time to work on her speech. “Because she’s so determined, she really believes she’s going to get better,” her mother said. “And that keeps me positive.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

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first_imgDonegal Labour Senator Jimmy Harte called for a 32-county solution to diesel laundering. “There is fuel laundering along the Border, from Derry to Dundalk and now as far south as Dublin,’’ he said.He added that there was a massive opportunity for people to make huge profits on a single tanker of diesel. Mr Harte told the Irish Times he knew of a case in Donegal where the garage owner was convicted but the garage continued to operate and everyone knew where the diesel was being laundered.“Some garages reopen the day after being raided,’’ he added. “These people are willing to lose the cost of one day’s trading for the massive profits.’’Mr Harte said smuggling had been going on since the Border was established.“Some people have made a lot of money out of it and criminals have used it to enrich themselves,’’ he added. “It will continue until we devise a solution.’’ Fellow Donegal Senator Brian Ó Domhnaill (FF) estimated that the annual cost of diesel laundering to the taxpayer was between €120 million to €150 million, although the figure could be much higher.He added it also had consequences for consumers who purchased laundered fuel in the belief they were getting value for money.“While they may be able to buy fuel at a lower price than that available at legitimate fuel suppliers, I know an individual in Donegal who had the engine of his car wrecked as a result of buying laundered diesel,’’ Mr Ó Domhnaill added.Minister of State for Finance Brian Hayes said Revenue had made action against illegal fuel-related activities one of its top priorities and had adopted a comprehensive strategy.“There is an intensified targeting, in co-operation with other law enforcement agencies on both sides of the Border, of fuel laundering,’’ he added. “That has been ongoing.’’ Mr Hayes said one of the objectives was to cause maximum disruption to laundering plants and networks and to prevent trading by stations operating outside the law.HARTE DEMANDS 32 COUNTY SOLUTION TO DIESEL LAUNDERING was last modified: May 24th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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