Month: August 2019

first_img Ethanol vs. Electricity: Biomass converted into electricity could be more efficient than ethanol (w/Video) Citation: Electricity more efficient than ethanol as energy pathway from biomass (2009, May 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-05-electricity-efficient-ethanol-energy-pathway.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img (PhysOrg.com) — Electricity or ethanol, which is the better use of our nation’s biomass crops when it comes to powering vehicles? Our government seems to have chosen ethanol, recently announcing nearly $800 million of research money devoted towards biofuels, far more than they have committed towards bioelectricity. However, a recent study published in the journal Science seems to suggest that they, like me at the Kentucky Derby, may be backing the wrong horse. The team, led by researchers at UC Merced and Stanford, have found that bioelectricity outperforms ethanol across a wide range of input parameters, in terms of transportation efficiency as well as emissions. Energy is radiated to earth from the sun and stored by crops in molecular bonds. To harness and use that energy, we need to break those molecular bonds, typically by burning the crops. This method for harnessing energy has probably been mankind’s longest, ever since man discovered that one can burn wood to produce heat. In fact, until the 1860’s the U.S. used biomass in the form of wood for nearly 91% of all energy consumption. The biomass from crops such as corn can also be distilled into ethanol , which we can burn to produce energy. This research addressed two alternative energy pathways for biomass: Converting biomass into ethanol to power internal combustion vehicles or converting biomass into electricity to power battery electric vehicles. The technology to convert biomass into electricity already exists, and can be implemented using biomass boilers or integrated gasification combined cycle power plants (http://www.aesenergy.net/). There is a limited amount of land available to devote towards growing crops for biofuels before the sacrificing of land for foodcrops begins to inflate commodity prices. Therefore, the efficiency of such technology is of utmost importance. The study finds that bioelectricity outperforms ethanol in both transportation kilometers per area of crops per year, and greenhouse gas emissions. A small SUV driving on the highway can travel 56% farther in an electric vehicle powered by bioelectricity than in a gas engine powered by ethanol. A similar calculation was performed over a range of vehicle classes (small car up to full size SUV) and for both city and highway driving. Bioelectricity powered vehicles went on average 81% further than vehicles powered by ethanol. Greenhouse gas emissions were also lower for the case of bioelectricity. Furthermore, for the case of bioelectricity, CO2 gas can be sequestered at the power plant, resulting in a net removal of CO2 from the air.The study concludes that a given area of bio cropland would deliver more transportation and less greenhouse gas using a bioelectricity energy pathway rather than ethanol. Also, bioelectricity would further encourage electric transportation which is compatible with other green energy sources such as wind and solar. The researchers plan to continue this study, and factor in excluded criteria such as impacts on water resources, battery toxicity and recycling, air pollution, and economic constraints. Economically speaking, it is important to remember that the competiveness of ethanol depends on the price of petroleum, while the competiveness of bioelectricity depends on the cost of wind, coal, solar, and nuclear. Overall, the paper clearly shows that more research needs to be done before the country chooses ethanol over bioelectricity as the energy pathway of choice from biomass.More information can be found at Science, May 7, 2009, 10.1126/science.1168885.© 2009 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

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first_img Citation: Toyota to release solar charger for electric vehicles (2009, October 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-toyota-solar-charger-electric-vehicles.html Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Toyota is developing a solar charging station for electric cars and plug-in hybrids, making a green technology even greener. It has also designed a battery charger for mounting inside an electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid to recharge the storage batteries. Toyota Industries Corporation’s announcement follows similar press releases in August by Nissan Motor Co Ltd and Showa Shell Sekiyu KK. Toyota’s solar charging station will consist of solar cells capable of generating 100/200V of electricity. The station includes storage batteries to store the electricity generated until it is required to recharge electric vehicles. The station also has a communication facility to authenticate users’ identification information, and to communicate the amount of charge and other data to a remote data center. The communication system is expected to use LANs and Mobile networks.Earlier this year Toyota Industries unveiled a new public charging station for electric vehicles, which went on sale a few months ago at a cost of 450,000 Yen (around 4,600USD). Both the earlier public charging station and the new solar charging system were developed in collaboration with Nitto Kogyo Corporation. A variety of charging station options is needed to address the potential range limitations of electric vehicles, and a significant network of charging stations will need to be deployed to make electric vehicles viable for longer distance travel. Virtually all major car manufacturers are planning to launch electric or plug-in hybrid cars starting next year.Charging stations for electric cars are gradually becoming more widespread. In the UK the Department of Transport estimates there will be about two million electric vehicles by 2020. In the US, SolarCity and Rabbobank have created a partnership to provide free electric charging for electric vehicles traveling between San Francisco and Los Angeles along Highway 101. SolarCity has also bought SolSource Energy, which is in the business of installing charging stations for electric cars.Toyota made the announcement and exhibited the charging station and battery charger at the 2009 Tokyo Motor Show being held from October 23 to November 4, 2009 at Makuhari Messe, in Chiba City, Japan. The solar charger is scheduled for release late next year or in 2011 at a price of several hundred thousand Yen.Via: TechOn© 2009 PhysOrg.com Chicago Installs Solar Powered Charging Station for Electric Vehicles The charging equipment. Image: TechOn This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Intel is expected to show off its new Light Peak on Thursday. The Light Peak is a high-speed connection technology that several industry insiders have hinted that Apple is likely to adopt in future products. While nothing is confirmed at this point Intel set a statement to media outlets today stating that on Thursday in San Francisco the company will host a press briefing to discuss, “a new technology that is about to appear on the market.” Light Peak module close-up with laser light added for illustration (actual infrared light is invisible to the eye). Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Intel’s Light Peak Will Replace Copper Wirescenter_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com Citation: Intel expected to show off the Light Peak connection technology (2011, February 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-02-intel-peak-technology.html No word has been given yet as to whether or not this is related to another press event that Intel is holding at its campus in Santa Clara, Calif., where the company is going to be conducting product demonstrations.Intel has been working on the Light Peak for several years now. It is expected to be significantly faster than a USB 3.0, carrying, and able to carry data at a rate of 10 gigabits per second in both directions simultaneously. The Light Peak may also be able to scale up to a rate of 100 gigabits per second, according to Intel.The connection to Apple is only made stronger by the fact that Apple is also expected to make a big product announcement on Thursday, which may include both its new line of MacBook Pros, and possibly an update to its line of iMac desktop computers. Though no solid word has been give on the iMac update at this time.Intel Research has released an overview of the Light Peak technology online that can be found at http://techresearch.intel.com/ProjectDetails.aspx?Id=143, for anyone who is interested in learning more about the optical-based device.last_img read more

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first_img(PhysOrg.com) — A garage lab for research in biotechnology seeking bigger digs for an open science lab has opened its doors in Sunnyvale, California. Instead of sponsorship from big corporations and government, the garage-spirited fundraisers turned to Kickstarter, where 239 supporters donated $35,319 to get Eri Gentry and her team out of the garage and into a well-equipped lab space of 2,400 square feet. The lab is called BioCurious and its creed is to celebrate the hacker ethic, the desire to tinker, deconstruct, and rebuild, applied to biotechnology. Home-computer users at risk due to use of ‘folk model’ security © 2011 PhysOrg.com Explore further More information: biocurious.posterous.com/biocu … he-next-big-thing-tocenter_img After meeting for a year in a garage, the new space opened with an all-volunteer staff. Membership is $150 a month for people of all levels of experience, which gives them access to equipment, workspace, to follow biotech pursuits. Their governing principle is that “We believe that innovations in biology should be accessible, affordable, and open to everyone.” BioCurious is reaching out to entrepreneurs, engineers, aspiring biochemists, and just about anyone wanting to do hands-on scientific experiments. Some of the equipment in the new lab facility was donated to the collective, and they also bought some equipment at auctions. The lab has gel electrophoresis equipment, incubators, microscopes, fridge, freezer, pipettes and other equipment. BioCurious offers classes on such topics as personal genomics, hardware hacking, and a “Business of Biotech” lecture series. BioCurious speaks in plain, friendly language, inviting the public to “make genetically engineered bacteria, sequence DNA, find the tools to get your bio-project growing, or make friends with amateurs and experts in the community.”Executive director Eri Gentry said she was inspired by her own experiences at HackerDojo, a San Francisco community of engineers, artists and other creatives who use the working and social facility in Mountain View, California. “You could tell right away that you could ask anyone for help. You could ask stupid questions. I realized there that this culture could be created. And it could be done for science.”A hacker after all is anyone that is skilled at what he or she does, As useful as the machines and tools are for those who cannot afford more expensive laboratory space, “the cool hangout space” at BioCurious is the component that most captures what BioCurious is all about. “Our hangout space is the same sort of place for computer hackers,” she said. At BioCurious, you feel the same kind of “awesomeness” from sharing ideas and enthusiasm, she added. “Brainstorming turns into something when you put a lab next to it.” Gentry is nonetheless prepared for doubters who think a citizen-science construct is crazy.”‘You’re letting people off the street do science? You’re kidding me?’ And will come up with ridiculous ideas of people cloning other humans or infecting people with Ebola virus,“ she said, in an interview. Over the past year, however, plans were put in place. The BioCurious volunteers established a non-profit business entity, held meet-ups, acquired donated equipment, evaluated lab spaces, and established safety and waste disposal procedures. Citation: Pioneering bio hacker group finds home (2011, October 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-10-bio-hacker-group-home.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img More information: www.ntia.doc.gov/files/ntia/va_tech_response.pdfvia TechnologyReview Field experiments of 4G LTE-advanced system underway (Phys.org)—This much everyone knows: As technologies break new ground in speed and performance, mischief-makers also break new ground in finding ways to disrupt. Now an academic research group has warned a U.S. government agency of their findings, which show that the LTE high-speed wireless data networks of today and tomorrow are vulnerable to a jamming technique that could destroy service across a city. They say it could take nothing more complex than a laptop and $650 battery-operated radio unit aimed at portions of the LTE signal, to knock out an LTE base station, affecting large numbers of city residents. Explore further Citation: Jamming LTE base stations easier than you may think (2012, November 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-lte-base-stations-easier.html Jeffrey Reed, director of wireless at Virginia Tech and graduate research assistant Marc Lichtman warned that any one of eight weaknesses in the LTE configuration, meaning eight different attacks are possible, can put a stop to all communications from a targeted base station.The LTE signal is complex, made up of many subsystems. By taking out one subsystem, the entire base station goes with it. In spite of LTE’s complexity, a perpetrator with the knowledge of a communications engineer could figure it out. As troubling, they pointed out that if an attacker added an inexpensive power amplifier to the rig, that person could take down an LTE network in a larger region.The warning comes at a time of promotional ads touting speed paths possible with LTE. The term LTE stands for long-term evolution but the “long-term” seems just around the corner, with promoters saying that LTE is the choice high-bandwidth mobile network technology of today and tomorrow. Vendors of smartphones and carriers are promoting their intentions for a transition to LTE networks. On November 7, Reed and Lichtman filed with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, (NTIA) which advises the President on telecommunications and information policy issues. The NTIA invited comments from experts on the feasibility of using LTE for the emergency responder initiative, First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet), as LTE has been proposed for next-generation systems for emergency response.”If LTE technology is to be used for the air interface of the public safety network, then we should consider the types of jamming attacks that could occur five or ten years from now. It is very possible for radio jamming to accompany a terrorist attack, for the purpose of preventing communications and increasing destruction,” they wrote. They warned that terrorists could compromise an LTE network to confuse a response to an attack.In the cover note to Lawrence Strickling, Assistant Secretary for Communications and Information, the US Department of Commerce, the researchers said the filing was a response to the FirstNet NOI (Notice of Inquiry) regarding the conceptual network architecture. “The focus on our comments is on the information assurance aspects of LTE and contains a summary of some of our preliminary analysis. This work is still in progress and we would be pleased to share details of our current and future findings on this issue.” © 2012 Phys.org 4G LTE single mode modem by Samsung. Credit: Wikipedia This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img More information: Self-motion facilitates echo-acoustic orientation in humans, Royal Society Open Science, DOI: 10.1098/rsos.140185 , http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/1/3/140185ABSTRACTThe ability of blind humans to navigate complex environments through echolocation has received rapidly increasing scientific interest. However, technical limitations have precluded a formal quantification of the interplay between echolocation and self-motion. Here, we use a novel virtual echo-acoustic space technique to formally quantify the influence of self-motion on echo-acoustic orientation. We show that both the vestibular and proprioceptive components of self-motion contribute significantly to successful echo-acoustic orientation in humans: specifically, our results show that vestibular input induced by whole-body self-motion resolves orientation-dependent biases in echo-acoustic cues. Fast head motions, relative to the body, provide additional proprioceptive cues which allow subjects to effectively assess echo-acoustic space referenced against the body orientation. These psychophysical findings clearly demonstrate that human echolocation is well suited to drive precise locomotor adjustments. Our data shed new light on the sensory–motor interactions, and on possible optimization strategies underlying echolocation in humans. Researchers find humans process echo location and echo suppression differently © 2014 Phys.org Explore further Journal information: Royal Society Open Science (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München in Germany has found that echolocation in humans involves more than just the ears. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Ludwig Wallmeier and Lutz Wiegrebe describe how echolocation is thought to work in humans as compared to other animals, and the results of a study they conducted using volunteers and a virtual reality system.center_img Citation: Virtual reality study shows echolocation in humans not just about the ears (2014, November 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-virtual-reality-echolocation-humans-ears.html Echolocation is a means of determining the location of an object in the near vicinity by emitting sounds and then listening to the echoes that are bounced off objects when they come back. Bats are perhaps most famous for their echolocation abilities but many other animals have some degree of ability as well, including humans. Wallmeier and Wiegrebe note that several studies have been conducted recently to discover just how well humans can use sounds as a means of navigating terrain when they are unable to see. Thus far, they also note, none of the studies conducted to date have been able to quantify such an ability, which tends to muddy the results. In their study, they sought to do just that.To find out how good people are at echolocation and what parts of the body are involved, they enlisted the assistance of eight sighted students—each was asked to wear a blindfold and to make clicking noises as they made their way through a long corridor. Over several weeks’ time, each learned to differentiate between sounds that were echoed back to them, which allowed them to gauge wall distance and eventually to walk easily through the corridor with no other assistance.Once they’d mastered the real corridor, each of the volunteers was asked to sit at a virtual reality workstation that simulated a walk through the same corridor and to use the same clicks they’d used earlier. In the simulation, the researchers varied the experience—they tested abilities when the volunteers were able to alter the orientation of the corridor and how well they were able to continue their virtual walk when their head or body was held steady, preventing them from getting different angles on the echo feedback.In analyzing all the data they’d collected, the two researchers found that the volunteers lost most of their echolocation abilities when they were restricted from movement—they ran into walls that were easily avoided when allowed to move freely. By moving echolocation to a simulated environment, the researchers believe that they have finally found a way to quantify echolocation ability in humans. Illustration of the virtual corridor. Echo-acoustic orientation performance was tested at two positions on the midline of the corridor (positions M1 and M2 at rear wall distances of 75 and 700 cm, respectively) and two positions 75 cm from the left lateral wall (positions L1 and L2 at rear wall distances of 75 and 700 cm, respectively). Credit: Royal Society Open Science, DOI: 10.1098/rsos.140185 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img Nano ‘hall of mirrors’ causes molecules to mix with light Journal information: Nature Explore further (Phys.org)—A combined team of researchers from Columbia University in the U.S. and the University of Warsaw in Poland has found that there appear to be flaws in traditional theory that describe how photodissociation works. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they took a different approach to studying what happens when light causes molecules to break apart and what they observed by doing so. David Chandler with Sandia National Laboratories offers a historical perspective and an analysis of the work done by the team in a News & Views piece in the same journal issue. Quantum effects in photodissociation. Credit: (c) Chemical physics: Quantum control of light-induced reactions, David W. Chandler, Nature 535, 42–44 (07 July 2016) doi:10.1038/535042a © 2016 Phys.orgcenter_img More information: M. McDonald et al. Photodissociation of ultracold diatomic strontium molecules with quantum state control, Nature (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nature18314AbstractChemical reactions at ultracold temperatures are expected to be dominated by quantum mechanical effects. Although progress towards ultracold chemistry has been made through atomic photoassociation, Feshbach resonances and bimolecular collisions, these approaches have been limited by imperfect quantum state selectivity. In particular, attaining complete control of the ground or excited continuum quantum states has remained a challenge. Here we achieve this control using photodissociation, an approach that encodes a wealth of information in the angular distribution of outgoing fragments. By photodissociating ultracold 88Sr2 molecules with full control of the low-energy continuum, we access the quantum regime of ultracold chemistry, observing resonant and nonresonant barrier tunnelling, matter–wave interference of reaction products and forbidden reaction pathways. Our results illustrate the failure of the traditional quasiclassical model of photodissociation and instead are accurately described by a quantum mechanical model. The experimental ability to produce well-defined quantum continuum states at low energies will enable high-precision studies of long-range molecular potentials for which accurate quantum chemistry models are unavailable, and may serve as a source of entangled states and coherent matter waves for a wide range of experiments in quantum optics. Scientists have known for some time that light is able to cause molecules to break apart—oxygen molecules are broken apart in the atmosphere by sunlight, for example, but understanding how exactly the process works has been an ongoing project. Up till now, researchers have studied the process by irradiating a very cold supersonic molecular beam. This technique has suffered from the problem of not being able to create a beam that was low enough in temperature to allow for molecular pieces to be manipulated in a truly quantum state; instead they have had to rely on averaging results. In this new effort, the team developed a technique that allowed for tracking the disassociation at much slower speeds, which allowed them to get a better look at what actually occurs.To get a slower look, the researchers used an optical lattice to hold a group of strontium-88 atoms in a group, which were brought together by photo absorption, resulting in excited molecules. The team allowed the molecules to decay to their lowest quantum state, then excited them to specific states which allowed for studying them as they were exposed and broken apart by pulses of laser light. Doing so allowed the team to view a purely magnetic transition for the first time, and also to see that not all of the pieces of the shattered molecule flew perpendicular or parallel to the direction of the light source, which Chandler notes “can only be described by a full quantum-mechanical treatment of the light-absorption process.”The team next plans to conduct similar experiments using molecules brought to higher energy states to learn more about the ways in which the molecules behave in ways that seem more classical than quantum. Citation: Study suggests a flaw in traditional theory that describes photodissociation process (2016, July 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-07-flaw-traditional-theory-photodissociation.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img Chicago museum lifts lid on Egyptian mummy coffin Citation: Archaeologists open ancient Egyptian coffin thought to be empty and find it contains mummy remains (2018, March 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-archaeologists-ancient-egyptian-coffin-thought.html A team of archaeologists working at a University of Sydney Museum was recently surprised to discover mummy remains inside of an ancient coffin that was thought to be empty. The team has detailed their discovery and subsequent efforts to study the remains in Muse, a University of Sydney publication. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Credit: Musecenter_img © 2018 Phys.org As the team notes, the coffin was acquired by the university for placement in the museum by the museum’s founder, Sir Charles Nicholson, who classified the coffin as empty—that was 150 years ago, and the coffin was stored unstudied all this time, as no one knew there was anything to study. But last year, as a part of a project to take a closer look at all of its early Egyptian artifacts, the team opened the coffin, and to their surprise, found the mummy remains inside.The mummy and coffin are believed to be approximately 2,500 years old, though the mummy itself has not yet been officially dated. There is a strong suspicion that the coffin contains the remains of an Egyptian priestess named Mer-Neith-it-es—her name was mentioned on the hieroglyphics inscribed on the coffin. Initial study of the remains suggests they are those of a 30-year-old woman, which would fit with previous information regarding the priestess.Thus far, study of the coffin’s contents has involved taking photographs to record the exact layout of the material inside and laser scanning to create 3-D models of the remains. The mummy, the team notes, is not whole. Someone, perhaps tomb raiders, jostled and damaged the contents, some of which were removed. But there is enough to offer clues, the team adds, which will be followed as the remains are subjected to closer scrutiny. They are hoping to find material suitable for carbon dating, such as toenails. CT scans have thus far shown that the material in the coffin contains bones, resin fragments, bandages and several thousand beads, presumed to be from a funeral shawl.The find offers a unique research opportunity, the team reports, because it has been jostled, damaged and taken apart—complete mummies, in contrast, are not taken apart to peek inside because it would ruin them. This one, they point out, has already been ruined. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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first_img by NPR News Tom Gjelten 8.25.19 6:00am President Trump’s evident desire to identify who’s most “loyal” to Israel has a clear winner: U.S. evangelicals.Not only do they outpace U.S. Jews in their support for policies that favor the Israeli government, U.S. evangelicals have also become the fastest growing sector of the Israeli tourism market. The developments may even be related.”I’d say close to 100 percent of our travelers come back extremely pro-Israel in their political views,” says Pastor Andy Cook, who leads evangelical tours of the Holy Land twice a year.Back to its rootsTourist travel to Israel is growing about 10 percent a year, according to Eyal Carlin, the incoming North America director of the Israeli Tourism Ministry, with evangelical Christians a growing share of U.S. visitors.”More and more companies are entering each year with faith-based or evangelical packages,” Carlin says. “The evangelical world is going back to its roots.”The trend coincides with growing evangelical support for President Trump’s embrace of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his hard-line policies, even as U.S. Jews have grown more critical.A recent Pew survey found that 42 percent of U.S. Jews say Trump “favors Israel too much,” while just 15 percent of U.S. evangelicals agreed with that statement.Evangelical leaders of the “Christian Zionism” movement, from Jerry Falwell Sr. to Pastor John Hagee, have attributed their fervent support for the state of Israel to their own Holy Land travel, according to Daniel Hummel, author of Covenant Brothers: Evangelicals, Jews, and U.S.-Israeli Relations.”They say visiting Israel was a key part of their political awakening,” Hummel says, “and this goes down to the rank and file people in their organizations.”A prime Israeli selling point for evangelical tourism is the opportunity “to walk where Jesus walked.” The highlight for Robert Bowman, who visited Israel on an evangelical tour in 2017, was a visit to the dungeons in Jerusalem where Jesus is said to have been imprisoned while he awaited crucifixion.”We saw the rooms where he was flogged, and it was very emotional for us,” Bowman says. “We were all in tears, thinking about what the Lord Jesus went through and seeing the actual place where this happened.”Bowman, who pastors a small church in Riverside, Calif., said the trip made the Bible come newly alive for him. “I read about it all my life, and then I go there, and it’s, ‘Oh, this is what it means!” he says. “You can see it, which you can’t do when you just read it, except in your imagination.”For Sharon Litton of Shreveport, La., the most memorable moment of her 2018 tour was the opportunity to be re-baptized by immersion in the Jordan River, where Jesus himself is said to have been baptized.”When that was offered to us, something inside of me said, ‘You got to go,'” she says. “It was just so dear to me, to be able to get in the water and be baptized, in the same water that Jesus was. It was incredible.”Controlled and curatedThe Holy Land tours may have the effect of deepening the visitors’ Christian faith, according to Andy Cook, who says he has taken 22 trips to Israel.”The location of all those Bible stories is always right where they’re supposed to be,” he says. “When people come home, they want to read more of their Bible. They’ve seen the locations, and they see the stories in the Bible as what they are, as history.”It’s not just the New Testament stories that come alive for the evangelical visitors. Many want to see the places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, and tour packages that are custom-designed for evangelicals now include a larger share of those sites.Israeli authorities are especially eager to accommodate this interest in ancient Israel, according to Hummel, knowing that it supports their territorial claims.”Most of these tours are very highly controlled and curated to convey a particular sense of Israel,” Hummel says, “and that’s to emphasize the Jewishness of the land, that this is the homeland of the Jewish people, that the history that matters is the history that’s in the Bible.”Hummel, who spent a year in Israel researching his book and now teaches in the history department at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, says the tours designed for evangelicals generally have minimal contact with Palestinians, even with Palestinian Christians. Most of the tours include a stop in Bethlehem, which is in Palestinian-controlled territory, but it’s only a day trip.The tours that Cook leads also include a stop in Jericho, also in a Palestinian area, but Cook acknowledges that outreach to Arab Christians is not a high priority”You may be talking about Orthodox Christians, or Catholics, or Christians for whom it’s a national identity,” he says. “It’s so, so different. At times it does not even appear to be the Christianity we would recognize at home.”Not surprisingly, many evangelical tourists return to the United States with greater sympathy for the Israelis in their conflict with Palestinians.”I tend not to trumpet the political part of the trip. That’s not our purpose,” Cook says, “but it’s invariable that people are going to come away feeling something. When you’re in the land and you hear the stories, it’s hard not to admire the fact that this country has survived, surrounded by so many people that would not like them to survive.”Only a small percentage of U.S. evangelicals have traveled to Israel, but the views of those who make the trip apparently resonate with evangelicals at large. A 2017 survey of evangelicals by LifeWay Research found that 80 percent believe that “God’s promise [of land] to Abraham and his descendants was for all time.” By a 46 to 19 margin, the surveyed evangelicals disagreed with the notion that Palestinians have any such “historic right.”Notably, LifeWay found that 80 percent of the surveyed evangelicals believe that the modern re-birth of Israel and the return of millions of Jews to that land are a fulfillment of Bible prophecy and show “we are getting closer to the return of Jesus Christ.” Some evangelicals say that prophecy includes a belief in a final battle of Armageddon that concludes with Jews accepting Jesus Christ as their savior.Notwithstanding such apocalyptic evangelical visions, Israeli authorities have welcomed evangelical tourism.”There is definitely an understanding on the Israeli government side that tourism is a key way to connect with American evangelicals,” says Hummel, “and a lot of the pro-Israel groups in the United States see tourism as a key way to shape evangelical attitudes toward Israel.”As evangelical attitudes toward Israel grow increasingly positive, the views of U.S. Jews are cooling. Recent surveys by the American Jewish Committee showed a decline in the share of U.S. Jews who say that “caring about Israel is an important part of my being a Jew,” down from 70 percent in 2018 to 62 percent in 2019.President Trump may argue that the fact that more than 70 percent of U.S. Jews generally vote for Democrats and rate his presidency unfavorably in spite of his strong pro-Israel policies show they are “disloyal” to Israel, but he can count on support for those policies among evangelical voters.Christians United for Israel, an evangelical group, now claims to have seven million members. That’s about the size of the entire U.S. Jewish population.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR. https://ondemand.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/atc/2019/08/20190822_atc_christians_vi… As U.S. Jews Cool To Israel, Evangelicals Flock There As… last_img read more

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first_imgMK Gandhi showed that to the world. A group of youngsters seem to have been inspired by the same ideals and are trying to bring about a revolution through non violent means. Adopting the tactics of  freeze mob, this group is aiming to raise awareness.‘We are a part of Education tree, a student led organisation which encourages the country’s youth to take up social and environmental responsibilities and bring about a holistic change and development of the issues involved,’ said Shivani Dewan, member, Education Tree. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’‘One of the important project of the organisation is Jo mera hai wo mera hai – My body My rights, of which I am a part of. It’s centred on taking up womens’ safety issues after the recent gangrape incident. As a part of this initiative we wish to create awareness among people about the various organisations, helplines, women’s groups, mobile applications which can provide help to women in distress,’ she added.‘We noticed that even after such a gruesome incident most women in the Capital are not aware of helpline numbers or self-defence techniques. Our main focus is to show do’s and dont’s both men and women should follow as a part of the society,’ said the JMC student. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixSo what exactly is a freeze mob? ‘It’s a silent way of protesting to spread the message. We are in total around 50-60 people from different walks of life who will participate in the activity which aims to bring about a constructive change through non violent protests. We mostly use unique art forms like graffiti, posters with slogans and street dancing (gestures) to create this awareness and sensitivity,’ said Shivani.‘One of the most memorable moment was at the recent event at Dilli Haat (during Comic Con), where while we did a freeze mob. We got a good response,’ she added.So far the group has done over 100 freeze mobs at different locations in Delhi and are gearing up for their recent.DETAILAt- DLF PLace Saket When- 24 FebruaryTimings- 4.30 pm  6 pmlast_img read more

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