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first_imgMark R H Kleinschmidt, Kenwyn . While I am outraged and saddened at the brutal killings of teenagers, Khayelitsha resident, 19-year-old Sinoxolo Mafevuka, and Muizenberg resident, 16-year-old Franziska Blöchliger, I am left bewildered by the insensitivity by some sectors of our communities highlighting the inequality of police investigations and resources of the tragic slayings.Both families of the deceased have suffered equal loss in the aftermath of the dastardly deaths, and both communities and the nation is understandably devastated. But I question and am saddened by the intention of illustrating the differences in resources afforded to each of the ghastly incidents.When our nation should be questioning the national govern-ment in respect of resourcing provinces equitably in policing, education and human settlements, then wherein lies the blame for the disparity?Crime and justice are colour blind; and so too is the bereavement of the loss of a loved one. There is no cure or quick-fix for sorrow or healing. For the Mafevuka and Blöchliger families their tragic loss is permanent.Let us for the sake of nation-building, work towards addressing the symptomatic effects of crime and the prevention thereof, by addressing the issue of economic disproportion to effect healing and reconciliation.The untimely and horrendous killing of the two teenagers highlights the disparity of the haves versus the have-nots in society, but let us proactively tackle economic and social disparity collectively as a nation.last_img read more

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first_imgHigher Education and Training Minister Naledi Pando, flanked by Professor Anthea Rhoda, Dean of the Faculty of Community and Health Sciences, left, and the chairperson of the Council of the University of the Western Capes, Yasmin Forbes – is given a tour of the midwifery simulation laboratory at the new Faculty of Community and Health Sciences building in the Bellville CBD. Minister Pandor officially opened the building on November 13. The University of the Western Cape (UWC) began its life as a site for limited coloured higher education – a restricted, disconnected geographical space. But successive leaders at UWC and beyond have rejected this notion of an apartheid institution, and worked to develop a more community-based approach to the academic project.On November 13, 58 years after the first students arrived at UWC’s main campus, the university grew beyond its apartheid cocoon with the official opening of the Faculty of Community and Health Sciences Bellville Campus in the Bellville central business district (CBD).“The opening of this building provides a strong lesson for all of us: you don’t have to let your past determine your future,” said Minister of Higher Education and Training, Naledi Pandor, at the launch. “We determine the fate of our lives, and of our country – and when we own that, we can achieve great things. I see this university owning its fate.”The Bellville campus is mainly an educational facility for the moment, and its 10 storeys host four UWC departments: Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, the School of Nursing, and the School of Natural Medicine. With much of CHS still located on UWC’s Main Campus, this also marks the faculty’s transition into a multi-campus force for public health.“As Dean of the Faculty of Community and Health Sciences of UWC, I know first-hand how important community is to us,” said CHS Dean, Professor Anthea Rhoda. “Bellville has been the home of UWC for almost 60 years. And while both the university and the community have grown from strength to strength, this new campus can help bring us closer together, and chart an even greater future.”The building, located in the former Jan S Marais Hospital and Salus House, doesn’t just have multiple seminar rooms, tutorial rooms and classrooms, dedicated staff areas, and parking, there’s also a spacious multipurpose hall able to sub-divide into smaller rooms for 60 to 120 students; training simulation labs for teaching basic nursing skills; psychology and midwifery; a rehabilitation gym for the occupational therapy and physiotherapy departments; natural medicine laboratories with treatment rooms and dispensaries; computer labs and resource centres; multi-faith prayer rooms, and more.“There are many examples of universities that are embedded within communities or occupy a central status within a town,” UWC’s Rector and Vice-Chancellor, Professor Tyrone Pretorius, noted. “These universities and their towns feed off each other, and their fates and fortunes are interconnected. This is what we envision for UWC – and this is therefore a significant milestone for us.”The new UWC CHS Bellville campus is an outgrowth of UWC’s commitment to the urban renewal strategy to uplift the Bellville surrounds and city centre as part of the improvement strategy of the Greater Tygerberg Partnership (GTP).“I’m really pleased to see the university’s expansion. When I look around, I see a young and vibrant university outgrowing and shedding, very spiritedly and in a determined and strategic fashion, its apartheid roots – and transforming itself into an exemplary institution of higher education and community.“The first students to enroll at the University College of the Western Cape (as it was then known) would almost certainly be watching us in awe,” Ms Pandor said. “And the apartheid architects who dreamt up a university for coloured people and stuck it on the Cape Flats could never have imagined your spirit and resilience.“I’m sure, wherever he is, Dr Hendrik Verwoerd must be turning in his grave.”last_img read more

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first_imgBianca Flanders plays Krotoa. A discussion around the story of Krotoa highlighted the untold stories of the Khoi people that were lost in history, and the lack of interest from the youth to find out more about where they come from.The musical theatre production Krotoa, Eva van de Kaap, will run at the Artscape Theatre until Saturday February 16.The discussion was held at the Innovation Room at the Artscape on Saturday February 3, and was focused on the role of the arts as a way of fast-tracking the changes needed to redress historic injustice, and how the story of Krotoa helps people define the terms of restorative justice. The event was also held to mark Black History Month, celebrated in February around the world. Krotoa, Eva van de Kaap is being staged in association with the Dutch theatre collective, the Volksoperahuis. Set in present day South Africa, a Dutch actor and singer and a South African actress meet on the film set of Krotoa, Eva van de Kaap. He takes the role of Jan van Riebeeck,the VOC merchant commander who established a refreshment station at the Cape in 1652. She plays Krotoa, the young Khoi girl taken into van Riebeeck’s household who went on to become a key negotiator and translator between the Dutch and the local people at a very young age. She was also the first Khoi woman to be baptised and the first to officially marry a European. The production puts Krotoa in the centre of her own story, and is a perspective-changing tribute to a neglected and contested aspect of shared history. Marlene le Roux, the CEO of the Artscape, said putting together the production was a spiritual and emotional journey for the people involved. “It is not easy for people to be taken on this journey, but it is important for our ancestors that we tell these stories. The journey of Krotoa is a journey for all of us. It’s a journey to reclaim Africa, and a lesson that we must never discriminate. This space is a space for everyone.” High commissioner of the Gorinhaicona Traditional Council, Tauriq Jenkins, who is also part of a programme at the University of Cape Town (UCT), which deals with the restoring of justice, said part of the restoration process is a broader conversation about the trauma of the past. “We all acknowledge the part of arts in the restorative process. Krotoa is an iconic, deep, humane figure, and her story is told by another, for another. Today it is being told with restoration in mind. The history that we share is part of our history as a country.” He said that when people speak about Krotoa, they speak of a time humanity lost itself. “Krotoa is the centre of who we are as people. Part of the healing process is understanding all that she had been through. This story is one that all South Africans need to know. If we don’t get to know it, we are robbing ourselves of a large part of our history.“This is more than just a play – it’s a demand for recognition of who we are, about stopping the harm done in the past. We must remember that this is our land. Huge wrong has been done in the past, and it needs to stop.”Doctor June Bam-Hutchison of the UCT Centre for African Studies, raised the question on how we decolonise people who’ve been erased from the stories of the past. “We need to look at the fact that some of these people have died with their stories, and look at the kind of colonial life and the stories about our people – especially the women. “The Khoi people are still alive in the memories of our elderly, and there are still traces of our history in our communities. “Krotoa is a story about erasure. She must have had so much untold knowledge, like our people of areas like District Six, where our history and knowledge were bulldozed. Krotoa is a metaphor for getting back our knowledge and the rituals, back into universities. Krotoa is our meaning of restorative justice.”Also part of the discussion was Chief Krotoa Elenor Smith, a member of the First Indigenous Nations of South Africa. She said the untold rituals and history of Khoi people that were taught by grandmothers had been lost. “Traditional medicines such as dassiepis and buchu are some of the examples of things that are on our doorsteps. “When do we take back the stolen knowledge? I appeal to people to take back your power, dignity and land.”She said the arts were important to highlight parts of the healing process. “It highlights what Krotoa stood for, what our grandmothers stood for. We need to take back our ceremonies and rituals.” Kershan Pacham, a PhD candidate and representative of the youth, said art has a way of restoring parts of our lives that were lost. “It’s about loss, and how we deal with that loss. It’s about coming out of the darkness by digging into the past and enlightening ourselves.” The director of Krotoa Eva van de Kaap, Basil Appollis, said it was important that people have the confidence to tell their stories. “We live with incredible stories every day, but we think it’s not important to tell. This is where it starts.”Courtney Lemmert, who recently found out that she was from Khoi decent, said there waslittle involvement from the youth at these gatherings. She said that the writers and researchers who have the correct networks should push such content and productions into schools and make it accessible for the youth so that they are aware of where they come from. The discussion was wrapped up with a song and dedication to Krotoa by Courtney’s mother, Amanda Lois Stone, a Khoisan singer and poet. Krotoa, Eva van de Kaap, was written by writer, film-maker and journalist Sylvia Vollenhoven. The story sheds new light on an ancient narrative, and contends that the story has not ended.The music for the production is by South African Frazer Barry and Jef Hofmeister, from the Volksoperahuis in The Netherlands.Krotoa, Eva van de Kaap is at the Artscape Arena until Saturday, at 3pm and 7.30pm. Tickets cost R100.Book through Computicket or 021 421 7695.last_img read more

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first_imgGrant Theunissen with Jimmy Nevis. Picture: Michael Stephens Novus Holdings donated R10 000 to the Blue Collar Foundation (BCF), a philanthropic initiative founded by South African musician, Jimmy Nevis, on Sunday March 17 during Nevis’ performance at the Concerts in the Park at De Waal Park. BCF aims to inspire and create change among the youth of Cape Town and has a special focus on education.last_img

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first_img Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. SHARE Published: August 11, 2016 1:17 PM EDT Updated: August 11, 2016 1:18 PM EDT MIAMI (AP) – U.S. forecasters say it’s more likely this could be the busiest Atlantic hurricane season since 2012.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s updated outlook predicts 12 to 17 named storms, including five to eight hurricanes, two to four of which could be “major.”On average, the U.S. gets 12 named Atlantic storms a season, including six hurricanes, three of them major.The El Nino effect in the Pacific that tends to reduce Atlantic hurricane activity is now dissipating. Gerry Bell of NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center said in a statement Thursday that the opposite, La Nina, phenomenon may form as the six-month season peaks, but shouldn’t have a significant impact.Landslides from Hurricane Earl killed nearly 50 people in Mexico last week. Two tropical storms have hit the U.S. this year. Forecasters: Busy Atlantic hurricane season is more likely last_img read more

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first_imgThe Trump-Clinton Twitter war: Bludgeon vs. stiletto Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. Author: AP SHAREcenter_img NEW YORK (AP) – Back in June, when Donald Trump slammed President Barack Obama’s endorsement of Hillary Clinton on Twitter, the Democrat’s campaign was quick to tweet back a chilly three-word response: “Delete your account .”It was a telling exchange, and not just because it set the stage for what has become the country’s first nationwide Twitter election. It also highlighted the striking, and very different, ways both presidential hopefuls have used the service to hone their messages, hurl accusations at one another and speak directly to voters – in effect, bypassing traditional media while also relying on it to amplify their retorts.So entrenched has Twitter become in the 2016 election that it can be difficult to remember just how new it is in this context. Four years ago, candidates Obama and Mitt Romney were just testing the waters with social media. This year, it’s a major source of information – political and otherwise – for a huge number of Americans. In a Pew Research Center poll last January, 44 percent of adults said they had learned about the election in the previous week from social media, more than cited print newspapers.“People are using Twitter to connect more directly to the live events, moments and candidates of this campaign in a way that voters have never been able to do before,” says Adam Sharp, Twitter’s head of news, government and elections.STILETTO VS. BLUDGEONThe candidates are certainly making the most of it. While Trump says he writes many of his tweets himself, especially at night, Clinton’s staff acknowledges producing the vast majority of hers. And Trump is definitely ahead by one crude measure: His followers outnumber Clinton’s, 12.7 million to 10 million.The former reality-TV star and GOP presidential nominee draws outsized attention for what he’s tweeting and retweeting on a near-daily basis, most recently for his attacks on fellow Republicans and unsupported claims that the Nov. 8 election will be “rigged.” During his primary campaign, Trump drew regular news coverage for Twitter assaults that bludgeoned opponents with insults and sometimes baseless charges.Trump’s approach hasn’t changed much in the general election, although his focus on his political opponent sometimes wavers. While he constantly refers to Clinton as “Crooked Hillary” and has continued to criticize the media for reporting that he is falling behind in the polls, he’s also launched long, and sometimes late-night, Twitter broadsides on a beauty queen, the Muslim family of a slain U.S. soldier and a federal judge.The Trump campaign didn’t respond to requests for comment.When the Clinton camp goes on the attack, by contrast, it uses Twitter more as a stiletto than a club. “Delete your account” is a popular internet meme, an arch putdown that suggests someone just said something so embarrassingly stupid that they should just slink away and disappear. The response was an immediate hit that ricocheted around blogs and news sites for days; it’s been retweeted more than half a million times.Trump is “that rough individual who will say anything,” a stance that his supporters find “very refreshing,” says Ian Bogost, a communications professor at Georgia Tech. Clinton’s tweet, by contrast, “signals to her base that she’s with-it on the internet,” he noted in an earlier piece in the Atlantic.In his first debate with Clinton on Sept. 26, Trump denied saying that climate change was a hoax perpetrated by the Chinese. Clinton’s social media team immediately pounced, retweeting Trump’s own 2013 tweet in which he said just that.After Clinton referred to a large fraction of Trump supporters as a “basket of deplorables ” for their sexism and racism, Trump retweeted a 2012 Obama tweet that argued the country doesn’t need a president “who writes off nearly half the country.” But Trump has also drawn fire for repeatedly retweeting white nationalists and promulgating at least one image condemned as anti-Semitic , an association Trump denied.SEIZING THE WHEELUnsurprisingly, the two campaigns have very different social media goals. Trump, who joined Twitter in 2009, has long used the medium as a direct channel to the public for promoting himself and testing the political waters – for instance, by fueling the lie that Obama wasn’t born in the U.S.Trump’s campaign staffers do sometimes seize the wheel, as when the account tweeted “thoughts and prayers ” for NBA star Dwayne Wade following the shooting death of his cousin in August. Trump’s first tweet on the subject 82 minutes earlier had noted the shooting and crowed, “Just what I have been saying. African-Americans will VOTE TRUMP!”Some analysts have noticed that most Trump-y tweets from Trump’s account originate from a different mobile device than ones that could have come from any traditional politician. That has spawned endless jokes – mainly on Twitter, naturally – along the lines of how his campaign staff fails to take away Trump’s phone during his tirades.The Clinton campaign takes a more traditional approach, operating as its own massive brand rather than as a singular, fly-by-the-seat-of-his-pants candidate. (Rare tweets directly from the candidate are signed “-H.”) Many of the campaign’s tweets are the typical boilerplate of politics – thanks to supporters, reiterations of the candidate’s positions, forwarding news of endorsements and other developments.Clinton’s approach hasn’t always fared well; an early tweet asking people to share how student debt makes them feel in “3 emojis or less ” quickly backfired. Responses on Twitter included, “This is like when your mom tries to be hip in front of your friends and totally fails at it.”THE DIGITAL 100Twitter is just part of a much larger Clinton digital presence run by a 100-person “digital team” that extends from Twitter to Snapchat to Quora to YouTube to Pinterest. It’s designed to draw in a broad range of voters, from young, social media savvy fans to Pinterest moms, while also working to undercut her rival on some of his favorite stomping grounds.Clinton’s digital team offered Snapchat filters during the GOP convention that let people paste old Trump quotes praising Clinton over pictures of the gathering. There’s the “Trump yourself” Facebook app, which lets users see how Trump would insult someone like them. “Fat pig” and “women are always ‘griping and bitching’” are just some of the options.Clinton even has a tool that invites people to “Troll Trump ” by signing up for automatic donations every time Trump tweets something offensive – which the campaign defines simply as every time Trump tweets.TWEETING FOR EFFECTThe Clinton campaign argues that social media is just a means to an end: winning the election.“Anyone who wants to say something unhinged, or (retweet) neo-Nazis” will likely get outsized attention, says Teddy Goff, chief digital strategist for the Clinton campaign. “Car wrecks get a lot of attention.”Trump, of course, has rarely suffered for lack of attention. But while his unfiltered tweets helped him lock up the GOP nomination, they’ve proven less effective in the general election. Falling poll numbers, however, haven’t cowed him. On Monday, he tweeted (without evidence) that Democrats are “making up phony polls” to suppress “the Trump.” He concluded: “We are going to WIN!” Published: October 26, 2016 4:41 AM EDT last_img read more

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first_img Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. Clinton tries to tap Beyonce’s Beehive in search for votes Published: November 5, 2016 11:51 AM EDT Updated: November 5, 2016 12:29 PM EDT SHARE CLEVELAND (AP) – The lights were bright. The beats were pumping. And the backup dancers were wearing blue pantsuits.After raucous performances from Beyoncé and her husband, rapper Jay Z, Hillary Clinton had one simple message for the packed, cheering crowd at Cleveland’s Wolstein Center: “Help us win Ohio.”Clinton’s campaign is turning to a series of free concerts to appeal to young and minority voters not necessarily motivated to vote for her. Beyoncé and Jay-Z offered their own testimonials to the woman who, if elected, would be the country’s first female president and follow its first black president.Beyoncé noted that less than a century ago, women did not have the right to vote.“Look how far we’ve come from having no voice to being on the brink of history – again,” Beyoncé said. “But we have to vote.”The singer says she was thrilled that her young nephew was able to witness Barack Obama’s 2008 election as the nation’s first black president.Now she wants her daughter “to grow up seeing a woman lead this country and know her possibilities are limitless,” Beyonce said. “That’s why I’m with her.”A series of hip-hop stars were part of the show, including Big Sean, J. Cole and Chance the Rapper, who encouraged the crowd to vote for Clinton – at the very least just to prevent Donald Trump from winning the White House.“His conversation is divisive,” said Jay Z. “He cannot be our president”Big Sean recalled being in the audience eight years ago when Jay Z hosted a similar free event for Obama’s campaign in 2008.Now, he told the cheering audience, “we with her.”At one point, Clinton’s famous quote that she “could have stayed home and baked cookies” flashed on the big screens. At another, the slogan “bad officials are elected by good citizens who do not vote” was blasted to the crowd.Clinton offered her own praise for the show. “I am so energized after this concert and I have to say: Didn’t you love the pantsuits?” Related Articles: last_img read more

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first_img Author: CNN Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. NORFOLK, Va. (CNN) When Sarah Sims’ daughter complained she was being bullied in elementary school, the Virginia mother grew concerned.Sims reached out to administrators at Ocean View Elementary School in Norfolk, Virginia, where her daughter is in fourth grade, but she said she got no response. In September, Sims decided to investigate on her own.She sent her daughter to school with a digital audio recorder in her backpack, hoping to capture audio from the classroom. School officials found out and confiscated the device, which had been in her daughter’s desk recording the school day.Now, Sims, who is herself a student at Virginia’s Norfolk State University, is in trouble with law.MORE: Bullying has a cost to society you may not even seeEarlier this month, Norfolk police charged Sims with a felony — intercepting wire, electronic or oral communications — and with a misdemeanor — contributing to the delinquency of a minor.“I’m a full-time student, so I don’t always get the opportunity to be on the premises, and I thought that this would be a good way for me to learn the environment,” Sims, 47, told CNN’s Don Lemon on Monday.She faces up to five years in prison if convicted on the felony charge.“I was appalled when I heard these charges,” Sims’ attorney Kristin Paulding said. “I was shocked to see that the school would decide to go to the police department and ultimately charge this mother as opposed to sitting her down and having just a simple conversation about what were her concerns and how could the school alleviate those concerns.”Paulding said the recording device “was a way to make sure that that classroom was a safe place” for the child. Because it was confiscated, Paulding said she doesn’t know what — if anything — the recorder caught.CNN reached out to Norfolk police on Monday but authorities declined to comment on the case. Police have not released a criminal complaint.Virginia is a one-party consent state, meaning it is legal for someone to record others when the person recording is involved in the conversation or when one of the parties in the conversation has given prior consent.The Norfolk commonwealth’s attorney’s office, which would prosecute the charges, said it just received the case report and hasn’t begun investigating, according to spokeswoman Amanda Howie.Norfolk Public Schools referred questions to Norfolk police.“We are unable to comment on any pending legal matters,” school district spokeswoman Khalilah LeGrand said in an email.Sims said she doesn’t know why the school called the police and not her when the incident happened last month.It wasn’t the first time her daughter had been bullied at the school, Sims said.In third grade, her daughter “had been kicked in her stomach and hit with a jump rope on the playground,” Sims said, adding that the school didn’t notify her then.“She became very anxious about attending,” Sims said. “I removed her from the school because she was refusing to go. She felt like she wasn’t protected.”Sims said her daughter tried to remain positive when she faced bullying again this school year.“I did not want to just side with my child. I wanted to be fair,” Sims said.MORE: Florida House bill targets bullying in senior communitiesWhen her daughter complained, Sims tried to encourage her at first.“I felt like I kind of let her down a little bit because I wasn’t believing her,” Sims said.Sims’ daughter still attends the school but is now is a different class.A court date is set for January 18. Published: November 28, 2017 6:14 AM EST The coronavirus pandemic has protected children from bullying, but that may not be helpful in the long run Recommended SHARE Mother faces felony charge after using recorder to thwart school bullies Sixth grade boys accused of pinning down black girl and cutting off her dreadlocks last_img read more

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first_imgThe suggestion by Laura Kelly that £400 to £500 after-the-event policies are responsible for the ‘mess’ in the civil legal costs system should be taken with a big pinch of salt. What is missing from the discussion on claimant personal injury solicitors’ costs is the unreasonable stance taken by defendant solicitors on the simplest of cases. Take a recent case of mine against our local council. A road traffic accident occurred in September 2006 between a council van and my client’s Nissan Micra. There was clear evidence to suggest that the defendant driver did not even stop at the scene (hit and run). Despite this, the defendant solicitors, another Lancashire-based firm, defended the matter to the hilt. Liability was disputed, low-velocity impact was alleged, and the claimants were also subjected to examination by a defendant medical expert. Forensic engineering evidence on impact forces was served, when even to the untrained eye the impact damage to the little Micra was significant. Five years later (yes, five, that is not a misprint), the matter came to a two-day trial in November 2011 where both claimants were vindicated 100% and each recovered £1,250. The claimants had long since made part 36 offers to accept £1,050 and justifiably also got an order for indemnity costs against the defendants. The costs? The claimants’ bill came close to hitting six figures, and yes the uplift was 100%, a decision that was also justified with the benefit of hindsight. How much scrutiny do defendant solicitors get from their insurer client when they are responsible for advising the insurer to defend cases such as this one? Perhaps the insurers should stop complaining about claimant solicitor costs and cast an eye closer to home. Mohammed Patel, solicitor and director, MRH Solicitors, Boltonlast_img read more

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first_imgA solicitor QC who acts for firms under investigation by the Solicitors Regulation Authority has accused SRA investigators of a ‘Kafkaesque’ lack of proportionality in their dealings with small firms and individual solicitors. Andrew Hopper QC (pictured) told the annual conference of the Solicitor Sole Practitioners Group last weekend that SRA investigators should ‘self-audit’ their own processes to bring ‘fairness into play’. Hopper said firms are turning down legitimate business because of a fear of SRA action. He gave the example of a small black and minority ethnic firm that declined an instruction to handle the £10m purchase of a property off London’s Park Lane because it thought that the SRA would ‘swoop’. The firm left the profitable transaction to a larger firm that could carry it out without fear of challenge. In another firm, one partner of eight had contravened the rules and then moved on. Applying the principle of ‘vicarious liability’, the SRA took the seven remaining partners to the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal. Hopper said: ‘One is left with a sense of Kafkaesque disbelief. This is not what outcomes-focused regulation is supposed to be about. ‘The black mark hanging over the firm disqualifies it in the earliest stage of tendering for any public contract, while the individuals affected will find it impossible to find a new position.’ When faced with poor decisions, the only option for firms is to judicially review the SRA – which most find ‘unattractive’, Hopper said. ‘The SRA should adopt a form of self-audit to examine whether the impact of its actions is proportionate.’ He also called upon the SRA to review the way it communicates with firms under investigation. Presently, he said, firms receive a letter requiring a response to a dozen or more questions within 14 days. Firms then endure months of silence before receiving another letter, requiring more answers within 14 days. Requests for progress reports or information such as the nature of charges against them are refused, Hopper said. ‘In the meantime, the firms will struggle to get professional indemnity insurance cover because the application form asks about SRA investigations and no top-notch lawyers will want to join a tainted firm. ‘It would help if the SRA was able to regulate itself, but it seems it is accountable to nobody.’ Invited to respond to Hopper’s address, SRA chief executive Antony Townsend said: ‘It is difficult to respond to anecdote-based evidence. Our aim is to get it proportionate and right.’last_img read more

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